versatility


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ver·sa·tile

 (vûr′sə-təl, -tīl′)
adj.
1. Capable of doing many things competently.
2. Having varied uses or serving many functions: "The most versatile of vegetables is the tomato" (Craig Claiborne).
3. Variable or inconstant; changeable: a versatile temperament.
4. Biology Capable of moving freely in all directions, as the loosely attached anthers of certain flowers.

[Latin versātilis, from versātus, past participle of versāre, to turn; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

ver′sa·tile·ly adv.
ver′sa·til′i·ty (-tĭl′ĭ-tē), ver′sa·tile·ness (-təl-nĭs, -tīl′-) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.versatility - having a wide variety of skills
skillfulness - the state of being cognitively skillful
Translations
تَعَدُّد المؤهلات او الإسْتِعمالات
všestrannost
alsidighed
sokoldalúság
fjölhæfni
všestrannosť
çok yönlülük

versatility

[ˌvɜːsəˈtɪlɪtɪ] N [of person] → carácter m polifacético, versatilidad f; [of tool, machine, material] → versatilidad f, múltiple funcionalidad f

versatility

[ˌvɜːrsəˈtɪləti] n
[person] → polyvalence f
[machine, tool, material] → polyvalence f
[food] → nombreux modes mpl de préparation

versatility

nVielseitigkeit f; (of sb’s mind)Flexibilität f

versatility

[ˌvɜːsəˈtɪlɪtɪ] n (of person) → versatilità

versatile

(ˈvəːsətail) adjective
1. (of people etc) able to turn easily and successfully from one task, activity or occupation to another. a versatile entertainer; He will easily get another job – he is so versatile.
2. (of a material etc) capable of being used for many purposes. a versatile tool.
ˌversaˈtility (-ˈti-) noun
References in classic literature ?
They have neither the matured and systematically trained powers of the Polygonal Bachelors and Masters of Arts, nor yet the native precocity and mercurial versatility of the youthful Tradesman.
It is a law of nature we overlook, that intellectual versatility is the compensation for change, danger, and trouble.
Seizing this unexpected occasion Therese had displayed a distracting versatility of sentiment: rapacity, virtue, piety, spite, and false tenderness - while, characteristically enough, she unpacked the dressing-bag, helped the sinner to get ready for bed, brushed her hair, and finally, as a climax, kissed her hands, partly by surprise and partly by violence.
And as the first was his first cousin, the second his second cousin, the third his brother-in-law, and the fourth his uncle by marriage, this conversational versatility certainly served in one sense to create a happy family.
And this not so much for the sake of his reputations--for, indeed, it was when he was at his wits' end that his energy and his versatility were most admirable--but because where he failed it happened too often that no one else succeeded, and that the tale was left forever without a conclusion.
He was a man of almost eerie versatility in this direction.
He perceived that such a picture presupposed, on her part, the experience, the versatility, the freedom of judgment, which she had been carefully trained not to possess; and with a shiver of foreboding he saw his marriage becoming what most of the other marriages about him were: a dull association of material and social interests held together by ignorance on the one side and hypocrisy on the other.
One reads of the astounding versatility of an actor who is stout and lean on the same evening, but what is he to the novelist who is a dozen persons within the hour?
There is so much, as you put it, to be explained, that the task, even to a man of your versatility, seems hopeless
I am sure," Wingrave answered, "I congratulate you upon your versatility.
William Morris, a man of remarkable versatility and tremendous energy, which expressed themselves in poetry and many other ways, was the son of a prosperous banker, and was born in London in 1834.
She restrained herself, however; and the "plain man" passed in his appalling versatility from sarcasm to veiled menace.