verse


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verse 1

 (vûrs)
n.
1.
a. A single metrical line in a poetic composition; one line of poetry.
b. A division of a metrical composition, such as a stanza of a poem or hymn.
c. A poem.
2. Metrical or rhymed composition as distinct from prose; poetry.
3.
a. The art or work of a poet.
b. A group of poems: read a book of satirical verse.
4. Metrical writing that lacks depth or artistic merit.
5. A particular type of metrical composition, such as blank verse or free verse.
6. One of the numbered subdivisions of a chapter in the Bible.
tr. & intr.v. versed, vers·ing, vers·es
To versify or engage in versifying.

[Middle English vers, from Old English fers and from Old French vers, both from Latin versus, from past participle of vertere, to turn; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

verse 2

 (vûrs)
tr.v. versed, vers·ing, vers·es
To familiarize by study or experience: He versed himself in philosophy.

[Latin versāre; see versatile.]

verse 3

 (vûrs)
tr.v. versed, vers·ing, vers·es Slang
To play against (an opponent) in a competition.

[Probably back-formation from versus taken as verses in such phrases as Boston versus New York.]

verse

(vɜːs)
n
1. (Poetry) (not in technical usage) a stanza or other short subdivision of a poem
2. (Poetry) poetry as distinct from prose
3. (Poetry)
a. a series of metrical feet forming a rhythmic unit of one line
b. (as modifier): verse line.
4. (Poetry) a specified type of metre or metrical structure: iambic verse.
5. (Bible) one of the series of short subsections into which most of the writings in the Bible are divided
6. (Poetry) a metrical composition; poem
vb
(Poetry) a rare word for versify
[Old English vers, from Latin versus a furrow, literally: a turning (of the plough), from vertere to turn]

verse

(vɜrs)

n., v. versed, vers•ing. n.
1. one of the lines of a poem.
2. a particular type of metrical line or composition: hexameter verse; elegaic verse.
3. a poem or a piece of poetry.
4. metrical composition; poetry, esp. as involving metrical form.
5. a stanza.
6. one of the short conventional divisions of a chapter of the Bible.
7. the part of a song following the introduction and preceding the chorus.
v.t.
8. to express in verse.
v.i.
9. to versify.
[before 900; Middle English vers(e), fers, Old English fers < Latin versus a row, line (of poetry), literally, a turning =vert(ere) to turn + -tus suffix of v. action; akin to -ward, worth2]

Verse

See also language; literature.

the art or skill of writing a poem in which the lines or stanzas begin with letters of the alphabet in regular order or one in which the first, middle, or final letters of the line spell a word or a phrase. — acrostic, n., adj.
an iambic hexameter, or iambic verse with six feet.
a foot of three syllables, the first two short or unstressed, the third long or stressed. — anapestic, adj.
1. (in quantitative meter) two long syllables followed by a short.
2. (in accented meter) two stressed syllables followed by an unstressed. Cf. bacchius. — antibacchic, adj.
the second of two metrically related sections in a poem. Cf. strophe. See also drama. — antistrophic, antistrophal, adj.
the accented part of a foot of verse.
1. (in quantitative meter) a short syllable followed by two long.
2. (in accented meter) an unstressed syllable followed by two stressed. Cf. antibacchius. — bacchic, adj.
1. the art or skill of one who composes and recites epic or heroic poetry, often to his own musical accompaniment.
2. membership in an ancient Celtic order of poets.
one of the main (larger) divisions in a long poem.
incompleteness of a foot, wherever it appears in a verse. — catalectic, adj.
a foot of three syllables, the flrst long or accented, the following two short or unaccented. — dactylist, n. — dactylic, adj.
(in Greek and Latin verse) the lengthening of a short syllable. Cf. systole.diastolic, adj.
a double foot; a pair of similar feet comprising a metrical unit. — dipodic, adj.
a couplet or pair of verses or lines, usually read as a unit.
(in Latin prosody) the elision of the last syllable of a word ending in m when the following word begins with a vowel.
a verse having seven metrical feet. — heptametrical, adj.
a verse having seven metrical feet; a heptameter. — heptapodic, adj.
a verse having six metrical feet. — hexametrical, adj.
a verse having six metrical feet; a hexameter. — hexapodous, adj.
a foot of two syllables, the first short or unstressed, the second long or stressed. — iambic, adj.
the stress or accent that indicates the rhythm of a verse or piece of music. See also music.
a technique of poetic composition originated by Isidore Isou, characterized by strange or meaningless arrangements of letters.
a poem or verse composed of dactyls and trochees or anapests and iambs, resulting in a proselike rhythm. — logaoedic, adj.
the practice of writing verse in song form rather than narrative form to embody the poet’s thoughts and emotions. Also lyrism.lyricist, n. — lyrical, adj.
lyricism. — lyrist, n.
a lyric poem suitable for setting to music, usually with love as a theme. — madrigalist, n.
1. any of various theories and techniques of metrical composition.
2. the study of metrics. — metricist, n.
1. the science of meter. — metricist, n.
2. the art of composing metrical verse. — metrician, metrist, n.
an abnormal compulsion for writing verse.
a verse consisting of one foot. — monopodic, adj.
a stanza of eight lines; an octave. — octonary, adj.
1. the laws of versification.
2. the art or practice of applying these laws.
a verse of five metrical feet.
a line of verse containing five feet.
1. Archaic. poetry.
2. Obsolete, a poem.
poor or mediocre poetry.
the qualities of bad poetry: trite subject matter, banal or archaic and poetical language, easy rhymes, jingling rhythms, sentimentality, etc; the standards of a poetaster.
1. Lit. Crit. the nature and laws of poetry.
2. the study of prosody.
3. a treatise on poetry.
4. (cap.) a treatise or collection of lecture notes on aesthetics composed by Aristotle.
a metrical foot of four short syllables. — proceleusmatic, adj.
1. the science or study of poetic meters and versification.
2. a particular or distinctive system of metrics and versification, as that of Dylan Thomas. — prosodist, n.prosodie, prosodical, adj.
a metrical foot composed of two short or unaccented syllables. — pyrrhic, adj.
the professional recitation of epic poems. — rhapsodist, n.
a form of divination involving verses.
1. the art or skill of writing verse in which each successive word in a line is longer by one syllable than the preceding word or in which each line of verse is longer by a syllable or a metrical foot than the preceding line.
2. an instanceof rhopalicform. — rhopalist, n.rhopalic, adj.
a poetaster or poet of little worth; a mere versifier.
the analysis of verse into its metrical or rhythmic components.
a foot of two syllables, both long or stressed. — spondiac, adj.
a section of a poem containing a number of verses.
a line of a poem; verse.
a form of divination involving lines of poetry or passages from books.
the first of two metrically related sections in a poem. Cf. antistrophe. See also drama.
a term describing a couplet in which the second line repeats the idea or content of the first line, but in different terms, as by using different images, symbols, etc.
the shortening of a syllable that is naturally long. Cf. diastole. — systolic, adj.
1. a verse of four feet.
2. Classical Prosody. a verse consisting of four dipodies in trochaic, iambic, or anapestic meter. — tetrameter, adj.
a verse of other measure having four metrical feet.
the composition of poetic triads. — triadist, n.
a foot composed of three short syllables. — tribrachic, adj.
a verse having three metrical units.
1. a stanza of three verses.
2. any set of three verses. See also music; numbers.
a verse or measure of three metrical feet.
a poem, strophe, or stanza of three lines. — tristichic, adj.
a foot of two syllables, the first long or stressed, the second short or unstressed. — trochaic, adj.
the omission of one or more unaccented syllables at the beginning or end of a verse. — truncated, adj.

Verse

 a certain amount of poetry; the poetic output of a particular author or group of authors, 1586; poetry considered as a whole.

verse


Past participle: versed
Gerund: versing

Imperative
verse
verse
Present
I verse
you verse
he/she/it verses
we verse
you verse
they verse
Preterite
I versed
you versed
he/she/it versed
we versed
you versed
they versed
Present Continuous
I am versing
you are versing
he/she/it is versing
we are versing
you are versing
they are versing
Present Perfect
I have versed
you have versed
he/she/it has versed
we have versed
you have versed
they have versed
Past Continuous
I was versing
you were versing
he/she/it was versing
we were versing
you were versing
they were versing
Past Perfect
I had versed
you had versed
he/she/it had versed
we had versed
you had versed
they had versed
Future
I will verse
you will verse
he/she/it will verse
we will verse
you will verse
they will verse
Future Perfect
I will have versed
you will have versed
he/she/it will have versed
we will have versed
you will have versed
they will have versed
Future Continuous
I will be versing
you will be versing
he/she/it will be versing
we will be versing
you will be versing
they will be versing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been versing
you have been versing
he/she/it has been versing
we have been versing
you have been versing
they have been versing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been versing
you will have been versing
he/she/it will have been versing
we will have been versing
you will have been versing
they will have been versing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been versing
you had been versing
he/she/it had been versing
we had been versing
you had been versing
they had been versing
Conditional
I would verse
you would verse
he/she/it would verse
we would verse
you would verse
they would verse
Past Conditional
I would have versed
you would have versed
he/she/it would have versed
we would have versed
you would have versed
they would have versed

verse

Technically, one metrical line of a poem, but more commonly used to mean a stanza and as a general description of poetry as distinct from prose.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.verse - literature in metrical formverse - literature in metrical form    
hush, stillness, still - (poetic) tranquil silence; "the still of the night"
epos - a body of poetry that conveys the traditions of a society by treating some epic theme
literary genre, writing style, genre - a style of expressing yourself in writing
epic poetry, heroic poetry - poetry celebrating the deeds of some hero
dolor, dolour - (poetry) painful grief
Erin - an early name of Ireland that is now used in poetry
lyric - write lyrics for (a song)
relyric - write new lyrics for (a song)
rhyme, rime - compose rhymes
tag - supply (blank verse or prose) with rhymes
alliterate - use alliteration as a form of poetry
poetise, poetize, verse, versify - compose verses or put into verse; "He versified the ancient saga"
metrify - compose in poetic meter; "The bard metrified his poems very precisely"
spondaise, spondaize - make spondaic; "spondaize verses"
elegise, elegize - compose an elegy
sonnet - compose a sonnet
sonnet - praise in a sonnet
scan - conform to a metrical pattern
lyric - of or relating to a category of poetry that expresses emotion (often in a songlike way); "lyric poetry"
sweet, sweetly - in an affectionate or loving manner (`sweet' is sometimes a poetic or informal variant of `sweetly'); "Susan Hayward plays the wife sharply and sweetly"; "how sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank"- Shakespeare; "talking sweet to each other"
2.verse - a piece of poetryverse - a piece of poetry      
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
clerihew - a witty satiric verse containing two rhymed couplets and mentioning a famous person; "`The president is George W. Bush, Who is happy to sit on his tush, While sending his armies to fight, For anything he thinks is right' is a clerihew"
doggerel, doggerel verse, jingle - a comic verse of irregular measure; "he had heard some silly doggerel that kept running through his mind"
limerick - a humorous verse form of 5 anapestic lines with a rhyme scheme aabba
3.verse - a line of metrical textverse - a line of metrical text    
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
iambic - a verse line consisting of iambs
Adonic, Adonic line - a verse line with a dactyl followed by a spondee or trochee; supposedly used in laments by Adonis
line - text consisting of a row of words written across a page or computer screen; "the letter consisted of three short lines"; "there are six lines in every stanza"
tetrameter - a verse line having four metrical feet
pentameter - a verse line having five metrical feet
hexameter - a verse line having six metrical feet
octameter - a verse line having eight metrical feet
octosyllable - a verse line having eight syllables or a poem of octosyllabic lines
decasyllable - a verse line having ten syllables
Verb1.verse - compose verses or put into verse; "He versified the ancient saga"
poesy, poetry, verse - literature in metrical form
indite, pen, write, compose - produce a literary work; "She composed a poem"; "He wrote four novels"
metrify - compose in poetic meter; "The bard metrified his poems very precisely"
spondaise, spondaize - make spondaic; "spondaize verses"
elegise, elegize - compose an elegy
sonnet - compose a sonnet
2.verse - familiarize through thorough study or experience; "She versed herself in Roman archeology"
familiarise, familiarize, acquaint - make familiar or conversant with; "you should acquaint yourself with your new computer"; "We familiarized ourselves with the new surroundings"

verse

noun
1. poetry, poems, lyrics, rhyme, balladry, poesy (archaic), versification a slim volume of verse
2. stanza, section, stave, canto, part This verse describes the three signs of spring.
3. poem, rhyme, ode, lyric, composition, ballad, sonnet He wrote a verse about her pride and sense of accomplishment.

verse

noun
A poetic work or poetic works:
Translations
بيت شِعْر، مَقْطَع شِعْري ، نَظْمشِعْرقِسْم أو فَصْل من التَّوراه
veršveršepoeziesloka
poesivers
stihvers
költeményversszak
erindi, versljóî, bundiî málvers
eilėsstrofa
dzejadzejolispants
slohaverše
kiticaverz
stih

verse

[vɜːs]
A. N
1. (= stanza) → estrofa f; [of Bible] → versículo m
2. (= genre) → verso m; (= poetry) → verso m, poesía f
in verseen verso
a verse version of the "Celestina"una versión en verso de la "Celestina"
B. CPD verse drama Nteatro m en verso, drama m poético

verse

[ˈvɜːrs] n
(= poetry) → vers mpl
in verse → en vers
(= stanza) → strophe f
[song] → vers m
(in bible)verset m

verse

n
(= stanza)Strophe f; a verse from “The Tempest”ein Vers maus dem „Sturm
no pl (= poetry)Poesie f, → Dichtung f; in versein Versform; verse dramaVersdrama nt
(of Bible, Koran)Vers m

verse

[vɜːs] n
a. (of poem) → verso; (stanza) → strofa; (of Bible) → versetto
b. (no pl, poetry) → poesia, versi mpl
in verse → in versi

verse

(vəːs) noun
1. a number of lines of poetry, grouped together and forming a separate unit within the poem, song, hymn etc. This song has three verses.
2. a short section in a chapter of the Bible.
3. poetry, as opposed to prose. He expressed his ideas in verse.
References in classic literature ?
But, like all happiness, it did not last long, for as sure as she had just reached the heart of the story, the sweetest verse of a song, or the most perilous adventure of her traveler, a shrill voice called, "Josy-phine
Si tu savais," and every verse ended with "si tu savais.
I am thankful that, though my boyhood may be said to have been set apart, like the youth of the royal David, for the purposes of music, no syllable of rude verse has ever profaned my lips.
He read Phoebe as he would a sweet and simple story; he listened to her as if she were a verse of household poetry, which God, in requital of his bleak and dismal lot, had permitted some angel, that most pitied him, to warble through the house.
A brief pause ensued; the preacher slowly turned over the leaves of the Bible, and at last, folding his hand down upon the proper page, said: Beloved shipmates, clinch the last verse of the first chapter of Jonah -- And God had prepared a great fish to swallow up Jonah.
Having learned late in life, Tom was but a slow reader, and passed on laboriously from verse to verse.
I knew, then, how a mother feels when women, whether strangers or friends, take her new baby, and close themselves about it with one eager impulse, and bend their heads over it in a tranced adoration that makes all the rest of the uni- verse vanish out of their consciousness and be as if it were not, for that time.
Poor Emmeline made poetry about all the dead people when she was alive, and it didn't seem right that there warn't nobody to make some about her now she was gone; so I tried to sweat out a verse or two myself, but I couldn't seem to make it go somehow.
There is not an excess of delicacy or chivalry in the ordinary country school, and several choice conundrums and bits of verse dealing with the Simpson affair were bandied about among the scholars, uttered always, be it said to their credit, in undertones, and when the Simpson children were not in the group.
Here are seven of you, besides myself, (who, she is pleased to say, am very entertaining already,) and she only demands from each of you either one thing very clever, be it prose or verse, original or repeatedor two things moderately clever or three things very dull indeed, and she engages to laugh heartily at them all.
I have a little boy, younger than you, who knows six Psalms by heart: and when you ask him which he would rather have, a gingerbread-nut to eat or a verse of a Psalm to learn, he says: 'Oh
Those books, both prose and verse, are consecrated to me by other associations; and I hate to have them debased and profaned in his mouth