vertical grouping

vertical grouping

n
(Education) another term for family grouping
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The school offers a large range of different subjects from Reception to Year 12, through creative timetabling and vertical grouping of classes across the school.
I always lift and tap the stock gently into the rear bag each shot, which helps prevent vertical grouping errors.
It could mean vertical grouping in some schools, which means up to three age groups together in the same class.
Another derives from the supplier networks created by dynamic manufacturers, commonly known as a vertical grouping or enterprise keiretsu because it is dominated by a strong company.
Vertical groupings are most noticeable in the automotive, electronics, steel and shipbuilding industries.
While smaller and less diversified, the vertical groupings are exceedingly effective because they are aligned more strictly on a dominant enterprise.
Another group that includes Settlements n[degrees]7 (three levels of long planks supported by bricks, cardboard, and other materials) and Settlements n[degrees]5 (a set of steel shelves smaller than those in the center of the room, with an assortment of found objects and one bronze piece) was formed of vertical groupings of industrial materials.
The elements are arranged in vertical groupings, whilst the horizontal rows show the commonalities in the period relationship.
Although similar to the parallel systems arrangement, new convention designs not only incorporate vertical groupings of plant material, but horizontal groupings as well.
Step 2 Place linear materials to form the vertical groupings.
Inter-firm networks are grouped broadly into four categories: large, diversified, family-owned groupings of companies before World War II (zaibatsu); horizontal groupings of companies from a range of industries and sectors after World War II (kigyo shudan); vertical groupings of successively smaller companies dominated by major firms at the top of an industry (keiretsu); and task force groupings which bring together firms for co-ordinated, relatively short-lived activities.

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