vertigo


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ver·ti·go

 (vûr′tĭ-gō′)
n. pl. ver·ti·goes or ver·ti·gos
1.
a. The sensation of dizziness.
b. An instance of such a sensation.
2. A confused, disoriented state of mind.

[Middle English, from Latin vertīgō, from vertere, to turn; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

vertigo

(ˈvɜːtɪˌɡəʊ)
n, pl vertigoes or vertigines (vɜːˈtɪdʒɪˌniːz)
(Pathology) pathol a sensation of dizziness or abnormal motion resulting from a disorder of the sense of balance
[C16: from Latin: a whirling round, from vertere to turn]

ver•ti•go

(ˈvɜr tɪˌgoʊ)

n., pl. ver•ti•goes, ver•tig•i•nes (vərˈtɪdʒ əˌniz)
1. a disordered condition in which one feels oneself or one's surroundings whirling about.
2. the dizzying sensation caused by this.
3. a disease marked by vertigo.
[1520–30; < Latin vertīgō whirling movement, dizziness =vert(ere) to turn (see verse) + -īgō n. suffix]

vertigo

Dizziness and lightheadedness, often caused by an infection of the inner ear that damages the organs of balance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vertigo - a reeling sensationvertigo - a reeling sensation; a feeling that you are about to fall
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease

vertigo

noun dizziness, giddiness, light-headedness, fear of heights, loss of balance, acrophobia, loss of equilibrium, swimming of the head He had a dreadful attack of vertigo at the top of the tower.

vertigo

noun
A sensation of whirling or falling:
Translations
دُوَاردُوار، دَوْخَه
závrať
svimmelhed
huimaus
strah od visine
svimi
めまい
현기증
aukščio baimė
bailes no augstumareibonis
höjdskräck
อาการเวียนศีรษะทำให้ทรงตัวลำบาก
yükseklik baş dönmesiyükseklik korkusu
sự chóng mặt

vertigo

[ˈvɜːtɪgəʊ] N (vertigoes, vertigines (pl)) [vɜːˈtɪdʒɪniːz]vértigo m

vertigo

[ˈvɜːrtɪgəʊ] nvertige m
to get vertigo → être sujet(te) au vertige
I get vertigo → Je suis sujet au vertige.
to suffer from vertigo → avoir le vertige

vertigo

nSchwindel m; (Med) → Gleichgewichtsstörung f; he suffers from vertigoihm wird leicht schwindlig; (Med) → er leidet an Gleichgewichtsstörungen pl

vertigo

[ˈvɜːtɪgəʊ] nvertigine f
to suffer from vertigo → soffrire di vertigini

vertigo

(ˈvəːtigəu) noun
dizziness, especially as brought on by fear of heights. Keep her back from the edge of the cliff – she suffers from vertigo.

vertigo

دُوَار závrať svimmelhed Schwindel ίλιγγος vértigo huimaus vertige strah od visine vertigine めまい 현기증 duizeligheid vertigo zawroty głowy vertigem головокружение höjdskräck อาการเวียนศีรษะทำให้ทรงตัวลำบาก yükseklik korkusu sự chóng mặt 眩晕

ver·ti·go

n. vértigo, sensación de rotación en la que se cree que uno gira alrededor del mundo exterior o que éste gira alrededor de uno;
labyrinthine ______ laberíntico.

vertigo

n vértigo
References in classic literature ?
The old man felt then that the young man had ceased to hope; he felt the blood rushing to his heart, and if he conquered the vertigo that threatened him, it was because he would rather see his niece living and mad than dead.
For he had fallen into that stage when men have the vertigo of misfortune, court the strokes of destiny, and rush towards anything decisive, that it may free them from suspense though at the cost of ruin.
When he went downstairs, he rested his beak on the steps, lifted his right foot and then his left one; but his mistress feared that such feats would give him vertigo.
had well thought over the fresh defeat he had experienced, when he perfectly comprehended the complete isolation into which he had just fallen, on seeing his fresh hope left behind him, he was seized as with a vertigo, and sank back in the large armchair in which he was seated.
Without any shadow of doubt, amidst this vertigo of shows and politics, I settle myself ever the firmer in the creed that we should not postpone and refer and wish, but do broad justice where we are, by whomsoever we deal with, accepting our actual companions and circumstances, however humble or odious as the mystic officials to whom the universe has delegated its whole pleasure for us.
Even the stubborn Kennedy began to feel moved, and yet the spectacle thus conjured up before him gave him the vertigo.
So he proceeded, impelled both by this irresistible flood, by fear, and by a vertigo which converted all this into a sort of horrible dream.
He bounded towards D'Artagnan, over whose brain a vertigo was stealing and who staggered as he caught at the door for support.
Read continuously, they produced a sort of vertigo, and set her asking herself in despair what on earth she was to do with them?
crudities, oppilations, vertigo, winds, consumptions, and
It was the beginning of a vertigo which lasted for six months, and which I began to fight with various devices and must yield to at last.
The effort was too great; he began to sway from side to side, as from vertigo, and before I could spring from my chair to support him his knees gave way and he pitched awkwardly forward and fell upon his face.