vest


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vest

 (vĕst)
n.
1. A sleeveless garment, often having buttons down the front, worn usually over a shirt or blouse and sometimes as part of a three-piece suit.
2. A waist-length, sleeveless garment worn for protection: a warm down vest; a bulletproof vest.
3. A fabric trim worn to fill in the neckline of a woman's garment; a vestee.
4. Chiefly British An undershirt.
5. Obsolete An ecclesiastical vestment.
v. vest·ed, vest·ing, vests
v.tr.
1. To place (authority, property, or rights, for example) in the control of a person or group, especially to give someone an immediate right to present or future possession or enjoyment of (an estate, for example). Used with in: vested his estate in his daughter.
2. To invest or endow (a person or group) with something, such as power or rights. Used with with: vested the council with broad powers; vests its employees with full pension rights after five years of service.
3. To clothe or robe, as in ecclesiastical vestments.
v.intr.
1. To become legally vested: stock options that vest after the second year of employment.
2. To dress oneself, especially in ecclesiastical vestments.

[French veste, robe, from Italian vesta, from Latin vestis, garment; see wes- in Indo-European roots.]

vest

(vɛst)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) an undergarment covering the body from the shoulders to the hips, made of cotton, nylon, etc. US and Canadian equivalent: T-shirt or undershirt Austral equivalent: singlet
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a similar sleeveless garment worn as outerwear. Austral equivalent: singlet
3. (Clothing & Fashion) obsolete any form of dress, esp a long robe
vb
4. (foll by: in) to place or settle (power, rights, etc, in): power was vested in the committee.
5. (foll by: with) to bestow or confer (on): the company was vested with authority.
6. (Law) (usually foll by in) to confer (a right, title, property, etc, upon) or (of a right, title, etc) to pass (to) or devolve (upon)
7. (tr) to clothe or array
8. (intr) to put on clothes, ecclesiastical vestments, etc
[C15: from Old French vestir to clothe, from Latin vestīre, from vestis clothing]
ˈvestless adj
ˈvestˌlike adj

vest

(vɛst)

n.
1. a fitted, waist-length, sleeveless garment with buttons down the front, usu. worn under a jacket.
2. a part or trimming simulating the front of such a garment. Compare dickey 1 (def. 1).
3. any of various sleeveless garments for the upper body, having a front opening and worn for style, warmth, or protection: a down vest; a bulletproof vest.
4. Brit. an undershirt.
5. Archaic.
a. dress; apparel.
b. an outer garment, robe, or gown.
v.t.
6. to dress or clothe, as in ecclesiastical vestments.
7. to place or settle in the possession or control of someone (usu. fol. by in): to vest authority in a new official.
8. to invest or endow with something, as powers, functions, or rights: to vest the board with power to increase production.
v.i.
9. to put on vestments.
10. to become vested in a person, as a right.
11. to devolve upon a person as possessor.
[1375–1425; (n.) < Italian veste robe, dress < Latin vestis garment; (v.) < Middle French vestir < Latin vestīre to clothe, derivative of vestis; akin to wear]

vest

In British English, a vest is a piece of clothing that you wear on the top half of your body underneath a shirt, blouse, or dress in order to keep warm.

She wore a woollen vest under her blouse.

In American English, a piece of clothing like this is called an undershirt.

When it's cold I always wear an undershirt.

In American English, a vest is a piece of clothing with buttons and no sleeves, which a man wears over his shirt and under his jacket. In British English, a piece of clothing like this is called a waistcoat.

Under his jacket he wore a navy blue vest with black buttons.
The men wore evening suits and waistcoats.

In both British and American English, a vest is a piece of clothing that you wear on the top part of your body for a particular purpose.

The police officers had to wear bulletproof vests.
Cyclists should always wear a helmet and a reflective vest.

vest


Past participle: vested
Gerund: vesting

Imperative
vest
vest
Present
I vest
you vest
he/she/it vests
we vest
you vest
they vest
Preterite
I vested
you vested
he/she/it vested
we vested
you vested
they vested
Present Continuous
I am vesting
you are vesting
he/she/it is vesting
we are vesting
you are vesting
they are vesting
Present Perfect
I have vested
you have vested
he/she/it has vested
we have vested
you have vested
they have vested
Past Continuous
I was vesting
you were vesting
he/she/it was vesting
we were vesting
you were vesting
they were vesting
Past Perfect
I had vested
you had vested
he/she/it had vested
we had vested
you had vested
they had vested
Future
I will vest
you will vest
he/she/it will vest
we will vest
you will vest
they will vest
Future Perfect
I will have vested
you will have vested
he/she/it will have vested
we will have vested
you will have vested
they will have vested
Future Continuous
I will be vesting
you will be vesting
he/she/it will be vesting
we will be vesting
you will be vesting
they will be vesting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been vesting
you have been vesting
he/she/it has been vesting
we have been vesting
you have been vesting
they have been vesting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been vesting
you will have been vesting
he/she/it will have been vesting
we will have been vesting
you will have been vesting
they will have been vesting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been vesting
you had been vesting
he/she/it had been vesting
we had been vesting
you had been vesting
they had been vesting
Conditional
I would vest
you would vest
he/she/it would vest
we would vest
you would vest
they would vest
Past Conditional
I would have vested
you would have vested
he/she/it would have vested
we would have vested
you would have vested
they would have vested

vest

undershirt
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vest - a man's sleeveless garment worn underneath a coatvest - a man's sleeveless garment worn underneath a coat
bulletproof vest - a vest capable of resisting the impact of a bullet
garment - an article of clothing; "garments of the finest silk"
three-piece suit - a business suit consisting of a jacket and vest and trousers
2.vest - a collarless men's undergarment for the upper part of the bodyvest - a collarless men's undergarment for the upper part of the body
undergarment, unmentionable - a garment worn under other garments
Verb1.vest - provide with power and authority; "They vested the council with special rights"
instal, install - put into an office or a position; "the new president was installed immediately after the election"
consecrate, ordinate, ordain, order - appoint to a clerical posts; "he was ordained in the Church"
coronate, crown - invest with regal power; enthrone; "The prince was crowned in Westminster Abbey"
enthrone, throne - put a monarch on the throne; "The Queen was enthroned more than 50 years ago"
ordain - invest with ministerial or priestly authority; "The minister was ordained only last month"
2.vest - place (authority, property, or rights) in the control of a person or group of persons; "She vested her vast fortune in her two sons"
give - transfer possession of something concrete or abstract to somebody; "I gave her my money"; "can you give me lessons?"; "She gave the children lots of love and tender loving care"
vest - become legally vested; "The property vests in the trustees"
3.vest - become legally vested; "The property vests in the trustees"
change hands, change owners - be transferred to another owner; "This restaurant changed hands twice last year"
vest - place (authority, property, or rights) in the control of a person or group of persons; "She vested her vast fortune in her two sons"
4.vest - clothe oneself in ecclesiastical garmentsvest - clothe oneself in ecclesiastical garments
dress, dress up - dress in a certain manner; "She dresses in the latest Paris fashion"; "he dressed up in a suit and tie"
robe, vest - clothe formally; especially in ecclesiastical robes
5.vest - clothe formallyvest - clothe formally; especially in ecclesiastical robes
apparel, clothe, enclothe, garb, garment, raiment, tog, habilitate, fit out, dress - provide with clothes or put clothes on; "Parents must feed and dress their child"
vest - clothe oneself in ecclesiastical garments

vest

verb
vest in something or someone (usually passive) place, invest, entrust, settle, lodge, confer, endow, bestow, consign, put in the hands of, be devolved upon All the authority was vested in one man.
vest with something (usually passive) endow with, furnish with, entrust with, empower with, authorize with The mass media has been vested with considerable power.
Translations
صِدار، صُدْرَهصَدْرِيَّةصديريقَمِيصٌ تـَحْتِيّمِعْطَف قَصير
tílkovesta
vestundertrøje
aluspaitaliivi
potkošuljaprsluk
atlétatrikómellénytrikó
vestinærskyrta
ウエストコート肌着
(남자용) 속 셔츠조끼
berankoviai marškiniai
apakškreklsvestevestes-
tielko
jopičmajicatelovnik
undertröjaväst
เสื้อกั๊ก
yelekatletfanilâiç gömleği
áo gi-lêáo lót

vest

1 [vest]
A. N
1. (Brit) (= undergarment) → camiseta f
2. (US) (= waistcoat) → chaleco m
B. CPD vest pocket N (US) → bolsillo m del chaleco

vest

2 [vest] VT to vest sb with sthinvestir a algn de algo
to vest rights/authority in sbconferir or conceder derechos/autoridad a algn
by the authority vested in meen virtud de la autoridad que se me ha concedido
to vest property in sbceder una propiedad a algn, hacer a algn titular de una propiedad

vest

[ˈvɛst]
n
(British) (worn under shirt, blouse)maillot m de corps
(US) (= waistcoat) → gilet m
vt
to be vested with sth → être investi(e) de qch
vested in sb
Parliament voted to strip him of the powers vested in him → Le Parlement a voté pour lui retirer les pouvoirs dont il a été investi.
to be invested in sb
All authority was vested in her → Elle était investie d'une autorité absolue.vested interest [ˈvɛstɪd]
n
to have a vested interest in doing sth → avoir tout intérêt à faire qch vested interests
npl (COMMERCE)droits mpl acquis

vest

1
n
(Brit) → Unterhemd nt
(US) → Weste f

vest

2
vt (form) to vest somebody with something, to vest something in somebodyjdm etw verleihen; the rights vested in the Crowndie der Krone zustehenden Rechte; Congress is vested with the power to declare warder Kongress verfügt über das Recht, den Krieg zu erklären; the authority vested in medie mir verliehene Macht; he has vested interests in the oil businesser ist (finanziell) am Ölgeschäft beteiligt; the vested interests in the oil business (people) → die am Ölgeschäft Beteiligten pl; he has a vested interest in the play (fig)er hat ein persönliches Interesse an dem Stück

vest

1 [vɛst] n (Brit) (with sleeves) → maglia intima; (sleeveless) → canottiera (Am) (waistcoat) → panciotto, gilè m inv

vest

2 [vɛst] vt (frm) to vest sb with sthinvestire qn di qc
to vest powers/authority in sb → conferire poteri/autorità a qn

vest

(vest) noun
1. a kind of sleeveless shirt worn under a shirt, blouse etc. He was dressed only in (a) vest and underpants.
2. (especially American) a waistcoat. jacket, vest and trousers; (also adjective) a vest pocket.

vest

صَدْرِيَّة, قَمِيصٌ تـَحْتِيّ tílko, vesta vest Unterhemd, Weste γιλέκο camiseta de tirantes, chaleco aluspaita, liivi débardeur, gilet potkošulja, prsluk canottiera, gilet ウエストコート, 肌着 (남자용) 속 셔츠, 조끼 vest vest kamizelka camiseta, colete жилет undertröja, väst เสื้อกั๊ก atlet, yelek áo gi-lê, áo lót 背心, 马甲
References in classic literature ?
Next morning Fred showed me one of the crumpled flowers in his vest pocket, and looked very sentimental.
Under his coat he wore a knitted grey vest, and, instead of a collar, a silk scarf of a dark bronze-green, carefully crossed and held together by a red coral pin.
She silently reached out to him, and he, understanding, took the rings from his vest pocket and dropped them into her open palm.
From beneath the flap of an enormous pocket of a soiled vest of embossed silk, heavily ornamented with tarnished silver lace, projected an instrument, which, from being seen in such martial company, might have been easily mistaken for some mischievous and unknown implement of war.
On his arrival from the other world, he had merely found it necessary to spend a quarter of an hour at a barber's, who had trimmed down the Puritan's full beard into a pair of grizzled whiskers, then, patronizing a ready-made clothing establishment, he had exchanged his velvet doublet and sable cloak, with the richly worked band under his chin, for a white collar and cravat, coat, vest, and pantaloons; and lastly, putting aside his steel-hilted broadsword to take up a gold-headed cane, the Colonel Pyncheon of two centuries ago steps forward as the Judge of the passing moment!
But unlike Captain Peleg --who cared not a rush for what are called serious things, and indeed deemed those selfsame serious things the veriest of all trifles --Captain Bildad had not only been originally educated according to the strictest sect of Nantucket Quakerism, but all his subsequent ocean life, and the sight of many unclad, lovely island creatures, round the Horn --all that had not moved this native born Quaker one single jot, had not so much as altered one angle of his vest.
He is in his shirt sleeves, with a vest figured with faded gold horseshoes, and a pink-striped shirt, suggestive of peppermint candy.
He was much over-dressed, in a gaudy vest of many colors, a blue neckerchief, bedropped gayly with yellow spots, and arranged with a flaunting tie, quite in keeping with the general air of the man.
So the gun was a purse; and very handy, too; you could pay out money in the dark with it, with accuracy; and you could carry it in your mouth; or in your vest pocket, if you had one.
Peggotty, with his vest torn open, his hair wild, his face and lips quite white, and blood trickling down his bosom (it had sprung from his mouth, I think), looking fixedly at me.
He ended; and th' Arch-Angel soon drew nigh, Not in his shape Celestial, but as Man Clad to meet Man; over his lucid Armes A militarie Vest of purple flowd Livelier then MELIBOEAN, or the graine Of SARRA, worn by Kings and Hero's old In time of Truce; IRIS had dipt the wooff; His starrie Helme unbuckl'd shew'd him prime In Manhood where Youth ended; by his side As in a glistering ZODIAC hung the Sword, Satans dire dread, and in his hand the Spear.
It is true, that of the golden and pearl-studded clasps, which closed her vest from the throat to the waist, the three uppermost were left unfastened on account of the heat, which something enlarged the prospect to which we allude.