vestry


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ves·try

 (vĕs′trē)
n. pl. ves·tries
1. A room in or attached to a church where the clergy put on their vestments and where these robes and other sacred objects are stored; a sacristy.
2. A room in a church used for meetings and classes.
3. A committee of members elected to administer the temporal affairs of a parish.
4. A business meeting of parishioners in a parish.

[Middle English vestrie, probably from Anglo-Norman *vesterie, alteration of Old French vestiarie; see vestiary.]

vestry

(ˈvɛstrɪ)
n, pl -tries
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a room in or attached to a church in which vestments, sacred vessels, etc, are kept
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a room in or attached to some churches, used for Sunday school, meetings, etc
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Church of England
a. a meeting of all the members of a parish or their representatives, to transact the official business of the parish
b. the body of members meeting for this; the parish council
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Episcopal Church Anglican Church a committee of vestrymen chosen by the congregation to manage the temporal affairs of their church
[C14: probably from Old French vestiarie; see vest]
ˈvestral adj

ves•try

(ˈvɛs tri)

n., pl. -tries.
1. a room in or a building attached to a church, in which the vestments, and sometimes liturgical objects, are kept; sacristy.
2. a room in or a building attached to a church, used as a chapel, for prayer meetings, for the Sunday school, etc.
3. (in the Episcopal Church) a committee elected by members of a congregation to serve with the churchwardens in managing the temporal affairs of the church.
4. (in the Church of England) a meeting of parishioners or of a committee of parishioners to discuss official business.
[1350–1400; Middle English vestrie. See vest (v.), -ery]
ves′tral, adj.

Vestry

 in the Church of England, the body which administers the affairs of the church or parish, hence, the collective body of churchwardens, 1672.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vestry - in the Protestant Episcopal Church: a committee elected by the congregation to work with the churchwardens in managing the temporal affairs of the churchvestry - in the Protestant Episcopal Church: a committee elected by the congregation to work with the churchwardens in managing the temporal affairs of the church
commission, committee - a special group delegated to consider some matter; "a committee is a group that keeps minutes and loses hours" - Milton Berle
vestryman - a man who is a member of a church vestry
vestrywoman - a woman who is a member of a church vestry
2.vestry - a room in a church where sacred vessels and vestments are kept or meetings are heldvestry - a room in a church where sacred vessels and vestments are kept or meetings are held
church building, church - a place for public (especially Christian) worship; "the church was empty"
room - an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
Translations

vestry

[ˈvestrɪ] Nsacristía f

vestry

[ˈvɛstri] nsacristie f

vestry

nSakristei f

vestry

[ˈvɛstrɪ] nsagrestia
References in classic literature ?
I stopped him on our way out to take advantage of my uncle's advice; in other words, to see how I looked in the glass over the vestry fireplace.
Schemes have indeed been laid in the vestry which would hardly disgrace the conclave.
Casaubon came out of the vestry, and, entering the pew, seated himself in face of Dorothea, Will felt his paralysis more complete.
Poyser had a joke against him after the wedding dinner, to the effect that in the vestry he had given the bride one more kiss than was necessary.
He was a very good old fellow, in his familiar way; and having stirred the vestry fire, he looked round the shelves of registers for a particular volume.
Nothing further was said until Silas was seated in the vestry, in front of the minister, with the eyes of those who to him represented God's people fixed solemnly upon him.
Then they went into the vestry and signed the register.
So next Sunday morning, afore service, I just looked into the vestry, an' began a-talking to th' Rector again.
The inside door then opened, and we entered the vestry.
The clergyman, waiting like me, was requested to return to the vestry.
She probably imagined that she was thinking about the Aids and their missionary box and the new carpet for the vestry room, but under these reflections was a harmonious consciousness of red fields smoking into pale-purply mists in the declining sun, of long, sharp-pointed fir shadows falling over the meadow beyond the brook, of still, crimson-budded maples around a mirrorlike wood pool, of a wakening in the world and a stir of hidden pulses under the gray sod.
On the second day he found his wife and Sir Percival whispering together quite familiar, close under the vestry of the church.