vetch


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Related to vetch: VTech, Common Vetch

vetch

 (vĕch)
n.
Any of various herbs of the genus Vicia of the pea family, having pinnately compound leaves that terminate in tendrils and small, variously colored flowers.

[Middle English vetche, from Old North French veche, from Latin vicia; see weik- in Indo-European roots.]

vetch

(vɛtʃ)
n
1. (Plants) any of various climbing leguminous plants of the temperate genus Vicia, esp V. sativa, having pinnate leaves, typically blue or purple flowers, and tendrils on the stems
2. (Plants) any of various similar and related plants, such as Lathyrus sativus, cultivated in parts of Europe, and the kidney vetch
3. (Plants) the beanlike fruit of any of these plants
[C14: fecche, from Old French veche, from Latin vicia]

vetch

(vɛtʃ)

n.
any of several climbing plants of the legume family, bearing pealike flowers, esp. Vicia sativa, cultivated for forage and soil improvement.
[1325–75; Middle English ve(c)che < Anglo-French; Old French vecce < Latin vicia]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vetch - any of various climbing plants of the genus Vicia having pinnately compound leaves that terminate in tendrils and small variously colored flowersvetch - any of various climbing plants of the genus Vicia having pinnately compound leaves that terminate in tendrils and small variously colored flowers; includes valuable forage and soil-building plants
legume, leguminous plant - an erect or climbing bean or pea plant of the family Leguminosae
genus Vicia, Vicia - widely distributed genus of annual or perennial and often climbing herbs
tare - any of several weedy vetches grown for forage
bird vetch, Calnada pea, tufted vetch, Vicia cracca - common perennial climber of temperate regions of Eurasia and North America having dense elongate clusters of flowers
bitter betch, Vicia orobus - European perennial toxic vetch
spring vetch, Vicia sativa - herbaceous climbing plant valuable as fodder and for soil-building
bush vetch, Vicia sepium - European purple-flowered with slender stems; occurs as a weed in hedges
Translations

vetch

[vetʃ] Narveja f (planta)

vetch

nWicke f
References in classic literature ?
Although the beaks and feet of birds are generally quite clean, I can show that earth sometimes adheres to them: in one instance I removed twenty-two grains of dry argillaceous earth from one foot of a partridge, and in this earth there was a pebble quite as large as the seed of a vetch.
For it was at the Vetch that he made his international debut in the green of Northern Ireland in 1964, aged just 17.
VETCH ME IF YOU Kidney vetch flower at "They partially attribute the occurrence of the species in relatively high numbers to the unusually warm weather - Northern Ireland has enjoyed its warmest spring since records began.
In general, Chinese milkvetch (Astragalus sinicus) or hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), as leguminous cover crops, and rye (Secale cerealis) or barley (Hordeum vulgare) as non-leguminous cover crops, are cultivated in paddy soils (Kim et al.
vetch 15, vetch 17, karabeli 1, karabeli 3 and 3a karabeli ", ie.
ONLY ghosts and butterflies play in the centre circle of Swansea City's old Vetch Field nowadays.
Sole vetch had the highest soil N and P at maize planting but bicultures resulted in higher soil N and P during the l ate maize growing season.
It flies from mid-May to August and lays its eggs on Athe caterpillar food plant, kidney vetch.
A lack of weed control in vetch crops causes' severe loss of productivity [2].
The objective of this work was to assess the yield of mass and nutritive levels of winter forage species, using pastures of lopsided oat (Avena strigosa) and common oat (Avena sativa) intercropped with ryegrass (Lolium multijkrum) and vetch (Vicia sativa L).
This study was carried out during growing seasons of 2001 and 2002 in Eskisehir to investigate the possibility of growing various vetch species in mixture with cereal crops in fallow areas of Eskisehir.
Common vetch (Vicia sativa) seed has been used in animal feeds as an alternative source of protein in poultry diets (Darre et al.