veto


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ve·to

 (vē′tō)
n. pl. ve·toes
1.
a. The constitutional power of the chief executive of a state or nation to prevent or delay the enactment of legislation passed by the legislature: The president has the veto and will use it.
b. An instance in which this right is exercised: the governor's veto of the bill.
c. An official document or message from a chief executive stating the reasons for rejection of a bill.
2. The power of one party or entity to forbid the actions or decisions of another party or entity: The producer has a veto over which songs get put on the album.
3. A prohibition or rejection of a proposed or intended act: Her plans to go away for the weekend were met with a parental veto.
tr.v. ve·toed, ve·to·ing, ve·toes
1. To prevent or delay (a legislative bill) from becoming law by exercising the power of veto.
2. To forbid, prohibit, or decide against: "She considered having another [drink] but vetoed the idea as unwise" (Stewart O'Nan).

[From Latin vetō, first person sing. present tense of vetāre, to forbid.]

ve′to·er n.

veto

(ˈviːtəʊ)
n, pl -toes
1. the power to prevent legislation or action proposed by others; prohibition: the presidential veto.
2. the exercise of this power
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) government Also called: veto message US a document containing the reasons why a chief executive has vetoed a measure
vb (tr) , -toes, -toing or -toed
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to refuse consent to (a proposal, esp a government bill)
5. to prohibit, ban, or forbid: her parents vetoed her trip.
[C17: from Latin: I forbid, from vetāre to forbid]
ˈvetoer n
ˈvetoless adj

ve•to

(ˈvi toʊ)

n., pl. -toes, n.
1. the power vested in one branch of a government to cancel or postpone the decisions or actions of another branch, esp. the right of a president or other chief executive to reject bills passed by the legislature.
2. the exercise of this power.
3. Also called ve′to mes`sage. a document exercising such power and setting forth the reasons for its use.
4. the power of any of the five permanent members of the UN Security Council to overrule actions or decisions by a nonconcurring vote.
5. an emphatic prohibition of any sort.
v.t.
6. to reject (a proposed bill or enactment) by exercising a veto.
7. to prohibit emphatically; disapprove: to veto a plan.
[1620–30; < Latin vetō I forbid]
ve′to•er, n.

veto


Past participle: vetoed
Gerund: vetoing

Imperative
veto
veto
Present
I veto
you veto
he/she/it vetoes
we veto
you veto
they veto
Preterite
I vetoed
you vetoed
he/she/it vetoed
we vetoed
you vetoed
they vetoed
Present Continuous
I am vetoing
you are vetoing
he/she/it is vetoing
we are vetoing
you are vetoing
they are vetoing
Present Perfect
I have vetoed
you have vetoed
he/she/it has vetoed
we have vetoed
you have vetoed
they have vetoed
Past Continuous
I was vetoing
you were vetoing
he/she/it was vetoing
we were vetoing
you were vetoing
they were vetoing
Past Perfect
I had vetoed
you had vetoed
he/she/it had vetoed
we had vetoed
you had vetoed
they had vetoed
Future
I will veto
you will veto
he/she/it will veto
we will veto
you will veto
they will veto
Future Perfect
I will have vetoed
you will have vetoed
he/she/it will have vetoed
we will have vetoed
you will have vetoed
they will have vetoed
Future Continuous
I will be vetoing
you will be vetoing
he/she/it will be vetoing
we will be vetoing
you will be vetoing
they will be vetoing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been vetoing
you have been vetoing
he/she/it has been vetoing
we have been vetoing
you have been vetoing
they have been vetoing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been vetoing
you will have been vetoing
he/she/it will have been vetoing
we will have been vetoing
you will have been vetoing
they will have been vetoing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been vetoing
you had been vetoing
he/she/it had been vetoing
we had been vetoing
you had been vetoing
they had been vetoing
Conditional
I would veto
you would veto
he/she/it would veto
we would veto
you would veto
they would veto
Past Conditional
I would have vetoed
you would have vetoed
he/she/it would have vetoed
we would have vetoed
you would have vetoed
they would have vetoed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.veto - a vote that blocks a decisionveto - a vote that blocks a decision  
balloting, vote, voting, ballot - a choice that is made by counting the number of people in favor of each alternative; "there were only 17 votes in favor of the motion"; "they allowed just one vote per person"
pocket veto - indirect veto of legislation by refusing to sign it
2.veto - the power or right to prohibit or reject a proposed or intended act (especially the power of a chief executive to reject a bill passed by the legislature)veto - the power or right to prohibit or reject a proposed or intended act (especially the power of a chief executive to reject a bill passed by the legislature)
power, powerfulness - possession of controlling influence; "the deterrent power of nuclear weapons"; "the power of his love saved her"; "his powerfulness was concealed by a gentle facade"
Verb1.veto - vote againstveto - vote against; refuse to endorse; refuse to assent; "The President vetoed the bill"
controvert, contradict, oppose - be resistant to; "The board opposed his motion"
vote down, vote out, defeat, kill, shoot down - thwart the passage of; "kill a motion"; "he shot down the student's proposal"
2.veto - command against; "I forbid you to call me late at night"; "Mother vetoed the trip to the chocolate store"; "Dad nixed our plans"
command, require - make someone do something
ban - prohibit especially by legal means or social pressure; "Smoking is banned in this building"
bar, debar, exclude - prevent from entering; keep out; "He was barred from membership in the club"
enjoin - issue an injunction
criminalise, illegalise, illegalize, outlaw, criminalize - declare illegal; outlaw; "Marijuana is criminalized in the U.S."

veto

verb
1. ban, block, reject, rule out, kill (informal), negative, turn down, forbid, boycott, prohibit, disallow, put a stop to, refuse permission to, interdict, give the thumbs down to, put the kibosh on (slang) De Gaulle vetoed Britain's application to join the EEC.
ban pass, approve, endorse, ratify, O.K. or okay (informal)
noun
1. ban, dismissal, rejection, vetoing, boycott, embargo, prohibiting, prohibition, suppression, knock-back (informal), interdict, declination, preclusion, nonconsent congressmen who tried to override the president's veto of the bill
ban approval, go-ahead (informal), endorsement, ratification

veto

verb
To prevent or forbid authoritatively:
Slang: nix.
Idiom: turn thumbs down on.
Translations
حَقُّ النَّقْصفيتو: حَق النَّقْضيَنْقُض، يَمْنَع
právo vetavetozamítnout
vetovetoret
veto-oikeus
veto
megvétózvétójog
neita, hafna; beita neitunarvaldineitunarvald
拒否権
거부권
vetovetuoti
uzlikt veto, aizliegtveto
právo veta
vetozavrniti
veto
อำนาจในการยับยั้ง
vetoveto etmek
quyền phủ quyết

veto

[ˈviːtəʊ]
A. N (vetoes (pl)) → veto m
to have a vetotener veto
to put a veto on sthvetar algo, poner veto a algo
to use or exercise one's vetoejercer el (derecho a) veto
B. VT [+ bill, application] → vetar, prohibir
the president vetoed itel presidente lo vetó or le puso su veto
I suggested it but he vetoed the ideayo lo sugerí pero el rechazó la idea

veto

[ˈviːtəʊ]
n [vetoes] (pl) → veto m
to put a veto on sth → mettre son veto à qch, opposer son veto à qch
power of veto → droit m de veto
vtopposer son veto à

veto

n pl <-es> → Veto nt; power of vetoVetorecht nt; to have a vetodas Vetorecht haben; to use one’s vetovon seinem Vetorecht Gebrauch machen
vtsein Veto einlegen gegen; if they veto itwenn sie ihr Veto einlegen

veto

[ˈviːtəʊ]
1. n (vetoes (pl)) → veto
to use or exercise one's veto → esercitare il proprio diritto di veto
to put a veto on → (op)porre il veto a
2. vt(op)porre il veto a

veto

(ˈviːtəu) 3rd person singular present tense ˈvetoes: past tense, past participle ˈvetoed verb
to forbid, or refuse to consent to. They vetoed your suggestion.
nounplural ˈvetoes
(also power of veto) the power or right to refuse or forbid. the chairman's (power of) veto.

veto

حَقُّ النَّقْص veto veto Veto βέτο veto veto-oikeus veto veto veto 拒否権 거부권 veto veto weto veto вето veto อำนาจในการยับยั้ง veto quyền phủ quyết 否决
References in classic literature ?
Linton has a prejudice against me: we quarrelled at one time of our lives, with unchristian ferocity; and, if you mention coming here to him, he'll put a veto on your visits altogether.
The Provision For The Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power From the New York Packet.
A man who might be afraid to defeat a law by his single VETO, might not scruple to return it for reconsideration; subject to being finally rejected only in the event of more than one third of each house concurring in the sufficiency of his objections.
I am sure the circumstances that we happened to come from Europe in the same packet, and that he continues to visit us now we are at home, do not entitle him to have a veto, as they call it, on my wardrobe.
Still they may entitle him to have this VETO, in petto.
To all these resolves, the captain opposed his peremptory veto, as "contrary to instructions.
I've lost my little veto,' he said, brokenly, at length.
And on top of that, mind you,' moaned Lord Runnymede, 'I lose my little veto.
Temperament is the veto or limitation-power in the constitution, very justly applied to restrain an opposite excess in the constitution, but absurdly offered as a bar to original equity.
That I have some claim to the exercise of a veto here, would not, I believe, be denied by any reasonable person cognizant of the relations between us: relations which, though thrown into the past by your recent procedure, are not thereby annulled in their character of determining antecedents.
On this morning of the Great Snow, perchance, which is still raging and chilling men's blood, I bear the muffled tone of their engine bell from out the fog bank of their chilled breath, which announces that the cars are coming, without long delay, notwithstanding the veto of a New England northeast snow-storm, and I behold the plowmen covered with snow and rime, their heads peering, above the mould-board which is turning down other than daisies and the nests of field mice, like bowlders of the Sierra Nevada, that occupy an outside place in the universe.
This, of course, was a challenge to the more adventurous spirits to occupy it; and as it was capacious enough for two boys to lie hid there completely, it was seldom that it remained empty, notwithstanding the veto.