vibrate


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vi·brate

 (vī′brāt′)
v. vi·brat·ed, vi·brat·ing, vi·brates
v.intr.
1.
a. To move back and forth or to and fro, especially rhythmically and rapidly: The eardrum vibrates in response to sound waves. See Synonyms at swing.
b. To progress in a given direction while moving back and forth rapidly: The sound wave vibrated through the water.
2. To be in a state of great activity, excitement, or agitation: "Even as the film moved ... to the more deadly fields of Vietnam, old hatreds vibrated in me" (Loudon Wainwright).
3. To produce a sound; resonate: "The noise of cars and motorcycles, voices and music vibrates from the street" (Edmundo Paz Solden).
4. To fluctuate or waver, as between states or in making choices: "The fear of repetition and the lure of repetition: these are the two poles between which the movie vibrates" (Wendy Lesser).
v.tr.
1. To cause to move back and forth rapidly: The rattlesnake vibrated its tail.
2. To produce (sound) by vibration.
n.
A setting on a cell phone that causes the phone to shake rapidly without producing a ringtone when a call or text message is received.

[Latin vibrāre, vibrāt-; see weip- in Indo-European roots.]

vi′bra·tive, vi′bra·to′ry (-brə-tôr′ē) adj.

vibrate

(vaɪˈbreɪt)
vb
1. to move or cause to move back and forth rapidly; shake, quiver, or throb
2. (intr) to oscillate
3. to send out (a sound) by vibration; resonate or cause to resonate
4. (intr) to waver
5. (General Physics) physics to undergo or cause to undergo an oscillatory or periodic process, as of an alternating current; oscillate
6. (intr) rare to respond emotionally; thrill
[C17: from Latin vibrāre]
vibratile adj
viˈbrating adj
viˈbratingly adv
ˈvibratory adj

vi•brate

(ˈvaɪ breɪt)

v. -brat•ed, -brat•ing. v.i.
1. to move to and fro, as a pendulum; oscillate.
2. to move to and fro or up and down quickly and repeatedly; quiver; tremble.
3. (of sounds) to produce or have a quivering or vibratory effect; resound.
4. to thrill, as in emotional response.
5. to move between alternatives; vacillate.
v.t.
6. to cause to move to and fro, swing, or oscillate.
7. to cause to quiver or tremble.
8. to give forth or emit by or as if by vibration.
[1610–20; < Latin vibrātus, past participle of vibrāre to move to and fro]

vibrate


Past participle: vibrated
Gerund: vibrating

Imperative
vibrate
vibrate
Present
I vibrate
you vibrate
he/she/it vibrates
we vibrate
you vibrate
they vibrate
Preterite
I vibrated
you vibrated
he/she/it vibrated
we vibrated
you vibrated
they vibrated
Present Continuous
I am vibrating
you are vibrating
he/she/it is vibrating
we are vibrating
you are vibrating
they are vibrating
Present Perfect
I have vibrated
you have vibrated
he/she/it has vibrated
we have vibrated
you have vibrated
they have vibrated
Past Continuous
I was vibrating
you were vibrating
he/she/it was vibrating
we were vibrating
you were vibrating
they were vibrating
Past Perfect
I had vibrated
you had vibrated
he/she/it had vibrated
we had vibrated
you had vibrated
they had vibrated
Future
I will vibrate
you will vibrate
he/she/it will vibrate
we will vibrate
you will vibrate
they will vibrate
Future Perfect
I will have vibrated
you will have vibrated
he/she/it will have vibrated
we will have vibrated
you will have vibrated
they will have vibrated
Future Continuous
I will be vibrating
you will be vibrating
he/she/it will be vibrating
we will be vibrating
you will be vibrating
they will be vibrating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been vibrating
you have been vibrating
he/she/it has been vibrating
we have been vibrating
you have been vibrating
they have been vibrating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been vibrating
you will have been vibrating
he/she/it will have been vibrating
we will have been vibrating
you will have been vibrating
they will have been vibrating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been vibrating
you had been vibrating
he/she/it had been vibrating
we had been vibrating
you had been vibrating
they had been vibrating
Conditional
I would vibrate
you would vibrate
he/she/it would vibrate
we would vibrate
you would vibrate
they would vibrate
Past Conditional
I would have vibrated
you would have vibrated
he/she/it would have vibrated
we would have vibrated
you would have vibrated
they would have vibrated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.vibrate - shake, quiver, or throbvibrate - shake, quiver, or throb; move back and forth rapidly, usually in an uncontrolled manner
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
shimmy, wobble - tremble or shake; "His voice wobbled with restrained emotion"
judder, shake - shake or vibrate rapidly and intensively; "The old engine was juddering"
2.vibrate - move or swing from side to side regularlyvibrate - move or swing from side to side regularly; "the needle on the meter was oscillating"
sway, swing - move or walk in a swinging or swaying manner; "He swung back"
hunt - oscillate about a desired speed, position, or state to an undesirable extent; "The oscillator hunts about the correct frequency"
librate - vibrate before coming to a total rest; "the children's swing librated"
3.vibrate - be undecided about somethingvibrate - be undecided about something; waver between conflicting positions or courses of action; "He oscillates between accepting the new position and retirement"
hesitate, waffle, waver - pause or hold back in uncertainty or unwillingness; "Authorities hesitate to quote exact figures"
shillyshally - be uncertain and vague
4.vibrate - sound with resonance; "The sound resonates well in this theater"
make vibrant sounds, purr - indicate pleasure by purring; characteristic of cats
sound, go - make a certain noise or sound; "She went `Mmmmm'"; "The gun went `bang'"
5.vibrate - feel sudden intense sensation or emotionvibrate - feel sudden intense sensation or emotion; "he was thrilled by the speed and the roar of the engine"
stimulate, stir, shake up, excite, shake - stir the feelings, emotions, or peace of; "These stories shook the community"; "the civil war shook the country"

vibrate

verb
1. shake, tremble, shiver, fluctuate, quiver, oscillate, judder (informal) Her whole body seemed to vibrate with terror.
2. throb, pulse, resonate, pulsate, reverberate The noise vibrated through the whole house.

vibrate

verb
1. To move to and fro in short, jerky movements:
2. To move to and fro violently:
Translations
يَهْتَز، يَرْتَج
chvět sekmitat
vibrere
titra, skjálfa
vibracijavibruoti
drebēttrīcētvibrēt
kmitať
vibrirati
titre mek

vibrate

[vaɪˈbreɪt]
A. VIvibrar
the room vibrated with tensionse palpaba la tensión en la sala
her voice vibrated with sorrowla voz le temblaba de pena
B. VThacer vibrar

vibrate

[vaɪˈbreɪt]
vivibrer
vtfaire vibrer

vibrate

vi (lit, fig)zittern, beben (→ with vor +dat); (machine, string, air)vibrieren; (notes)schwingen; the painting vibrates with lifedas Bild bebt or sprüht vor Leben; Glasgow’s West End vibrates with activityim Glasgower West End pulsiert das Leben; the town was vibrating with excitementAufregung hatte die Stadt ergriffen
vtzum Vibrieren bringen; stringzum Schwingen bringen; they study the way the machine vibrates the bodysie studieren, wie die Maschine den Körper erschüttert

vibrate

[vaɪˈbreɪt] vi to vibrate (with) (quiver) → vibrare (per); (resound) → risuonare (di); (footsteps) → risuonare

vibrate

(vaiˈbreit) , ((American) ˈvaibreit) verb
to (cause to) shake, tremble, or move rapidly back and forth. Every sound that we hear is making part of our ear vibrate; The engine has stopped vibrating.
viˈbration ((British and American) -ˈbrei-) noun
(an) act of vibrating. This building is badly affected by the vibration of all the heavy traffic that passes.
References in classic literature ?
Her breath was, however, expended in vain; for, although distinguished in her nation as a proficient in the art of abuse, she was permitted to work herself into such a fury as actually to foam at the mouth, without causing a muscle to vibrate in the motionless figure of the stranger.
This little bell,--to speak in plainer terms, --being fastened over the shop-door, was so contrived as to vibrate by means of a steel spring, and thus convey notice to the inner regions of the house when any customer should cross the threshold.
The feeling that it so evidently manifested, rather than the direct purport of the words, caused it to vibrate within all hearts, and brought the listeners into one accord of sympathy.
The word rang through him like the sound of a bell, echoing in the far depths of him, making forgotten chords to vibrate, old shadowy fears to stir--fears of the dark, fears of the void, fears of annihilation.
Cassy, therefore, with woman's tact, touched the only string that could be made to vibrate.
The third upon the next night when the last stroke of Twelve has ceased to vibrate.
In the ensuing interval, I told Miss Mills that she was evermore my friend, and that my heart must cease to vibrate ere I could forget her sympathy.
He was quite unable, by means of anything he heard or saw, to identify the Raveloe religion with his old faith; if he could at any time in his previous life have done so, it must have been by the aid of a strong feeling ready to vibrate with sympathy, rather than by a comparison of phrases and ideas: and now for long years that feeling had been dormant.
Nay, without thought or conscious desire, might not things external to ourselves vibrate in unison with our moods and passions, atom calling to atom in secret love or strange affinity?
If this tiny disc can vibrate a bone," he thought, "then an iron disc might vibrate an iron rod, or at least, an iron wire.
Perhaps the happiness of Allen-a-Dale and his lady had caused Robin's heart-strings to vibrate more strongly; perhaps, too, the coming of Will Scarlet.
The Professor's voice, as he spoke in clear, sweet tones, which seemed to vibrate in the air, calmed us all.