vibration


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Related to vibration: Mechanical vibration

vi·bra·tion

 (vī-brā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of vibrating.
b. The condition of being vibrated.
2. Physics
a. A rapid linear motion of a particle or of an elastic solid about an equilibrium position.
b. A periodic process.
3. A single complete vibrating motion; a quiver.
4. Informal A distinctive emotional quality or atmosphere that is sensed or experienced by someone. Often used in the plural: "Miami gives off the same vibrations, the same portent of disaster, but with a difference" (James Atlas).

vi·bra′tion·al adj.

vibration

(vaɪˈbreɪʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of vibrating
2. (General Physics) physics
a. a periodic motion about an equilibrium position, such as the regular displacement of air in the propagation of sound
b. a single cycle of such a motion
3. the process or state of vibrating or being vibrated
viˈbrational adj
viˈbrationless adj

vi•bra•tion

(vaɪˈbreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of vibrating or the state of being vibrated.
2. Physics.
a. the oscillating, reciprocating, or other periodic motion of a rigid or elastic body or medium forced from a position or state of equilibrium.
b. the analogous motion of the particles of a mass of air or the like, whose state of equilibrium has been disturbed, as in transmitting sound.
3. an instance of vibratory motion; oscillation; quiver.
4. a supernatural emanation that is sensed by or revealed to those attuned to the occult.
5. vibrations, Informal. general emotional feelings one has from another person or a place, situation, etc.
[1645–55; < Latin]
vi•bra′tion•al, adj.

vi·bra·tion

(vī-brā′shən)
A rapid motion of a particle or an elastic solid back and forth in a straight line on both sides of a central position. Vibrations consist of many oscillations. Compare oscillation. See Note at sound1.

Vibration

 

See Also: TREMBLING

  1. Body jerking like a fish —David Mamet, dialogue from “Hill Street Blues” television show, broadcast January 13, 1987
  2. (Light … came at him) throbbing like a drum —Mark Helprin
  3. Jerking like a decked shark —Denis Johnson
  4. A little ripple (went through her) like the commmotion set up in a weeping willow by a puff of wind —O. Henry
  5. Oscillate like a blancmange in an earthquake —John Wainwright
  6. (Thoughts) rattle about … like dried seeds in a pod —Ellen Glasgow
  7. Rattle about [a large apartment] like dried peas in a pod —Janet Hobhouse
  8. Rattled like a dicer’s cup —Davis Grubb
  9. (The King’s heart) rattled like spook chains in a horror show —Tom Robbins
  10. Rattling like a crockery shop in an earthquake —Arthur Baer
  11. [A cough] shook me like a coconut tree in a tornado —Dominique Lapierre
  12. Throbbing like a heart —Marguerite Yourcenar
  13. Throb like the heart of a coffee drinker —O. Henry
  14. Vibrating like a dog’s tail —Norman Mailer
  15. Vibrating … like a man with a high fever —Anon
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vibration - the act of vibratingvibration - the act of vibrating      
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
tremor, shudder - an involuntary vibration (as if from illness or fear)
2.vibration - a shaky motionvibration - a shaky motion; "the shaking of his fingers as he lit his pipe"
motion - a state of change; "they were in a state of steady motion"
tremolo - (music) a tremulous effect produced by rapid repetition of a single tone or rapid alternation of two tones
tremor - shaking or trembling (usually resulting from weakness or stress or disease)
3.vibration - (physics) a regular periodic variation in value about a mean
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
ripple - (electronics) an oscillation of small amplitude imposed on top of a steady value
undulation, wave - (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
transient - (physics) a short-lived oscillation in a system caused by a sudden change of voltage or current or load
beat - a single pulsation of an oscillation produced by adding two waves of different frequencies; has a frequency equal to the difference between the two oscillations
resonance - a vibration of large amplitude produced by a relatively small vibration near the same frequency of vibration as the natural frequency of the resonating system
sympathetic vibration - (physics) vibration produced by resonance
4.vibration - a distinctive emotional aura experienced instinctively; "that place gave me bad vibrations"; "it gave me a nostalgic vibe"
air, aura, atmosphere - a distinctive but intangible quality surrounding a person or thing; "an air of mystery"; "the house had a neglected air"; "an atmosphere of defeat pervaded the candidate's headquarters"; "the place had an aura of romance"

vibration

noun
1. shaking, shake, trembling, quake, quaking, shudder, shuddering, quiver, oscillation, judder (informal) The vibration dislodged the pins from the plane's rudder.
2. throbbing, pulse, thumping, hum, humming, throb, resonance, tremor, drone, droning, reverberation, pulsation They heard a distant low vibration in the distance.
Translations
إرْتِجاج
vibrace
vibration
titringur, skjálfti
vibrácia
titreme

vibration

[vaɪˈbreɪʃən] N
1. (= movement) → vibración f
2. vibrationsvibraciones fpl

vibration

[vaɪˈbreɪʃən] nvibration f

vibration

n
(of string, sound waves)Schwingung f; (of machine)Vibrieren nt; (of voice, ground)Beben nt; (of body)Zittern nt, → Beben nt
(inf, usu pl) = vibes b

vibration

[vaɪˈbreɪʃn] nvibrazione f

vibrate

(vaiˈbreit) , ((American) ˈvaibreit) verb
to (cause to) shake, tremble, or move rapidly back and forth. Every sound that we hear is making part of our ear vibrate; The engine has stopped vibrating.
viˈbration ((British and American) -ˈbrei-) noun
(an) act of vibrating. This building is badly affected by the vibration of all the heavy traffic that passes.

vi·bra·tion

n. vibración, oscilación.

vibration

n vibración f
References in classic literature ?
Its ugly and spiteful little din (heard now for the first time, perhaps, since Hepzibah's periwigged predecessor had retired from trade) at once set every nerve of her body in responsive and tumultuous vibration.
The flash of this knowledge--for it was knowledge in the midst of dread--produced in me the most extraordinary effect, started as I stood there, a sudden vibration of duty and courage.
Why upon your first voyage as a passenger, did you yourself feel such a mystical vibration, when first told that you and your ship were now out of sight of land?
At this instant, while Daggoo, on the summit of the head, was clearing the whip --which had somehow got foul of the great cutting tackles --a sharp cracking noise was heard; and to the unspeakable horror of all, one of the two enormous hooks suspending the head tore out, and with a vast vibration the enormous mass sideways swung, till the drunk ship reeled and shook as if smitten by an iceberg.
I waited till the last deep and full vibration had expired--till the tide of talk, checked an instant, had resumed its flow; I then quitted my sheltered corner and made my exit by the side-door, which was fortunately near.
I had no reason to believe that Littimer understood such arts himself; he never led me to suppose anything of the kind, by so much as the vibration of one of his respectable eyelashes; yet whenever he was by, while we were practising, I felt myself the greenest and most inexperienced of mortals.
He brought Bell to his house and showed him what Helmholtz had done--how he had kept tuning-forks in vibration by the power of electro-magnets, and blended the tones of several tuning-forks together to produce the complex quality of the human voice.
It is impossible to read the history of the petty republics of Greece and Italy without feeling sensations of horror and disgust at the distractions with which they were continually agitated, and at the rapid succession of revolutions by which they were kept in a state of perpetual vibration between the extremes of tyranny and anarchy.
This dazzling carpet, really a reflector, repelled the rays of the sun with wonderful intensity, which accounted for the vibration which penetrated every atom of liquid.
Then suddenly out of the golden haze of the sunset came the vibration of guns, and a form of black shadows moving.
The clock of the Invalides struck a quarter to twelve; the west wind bore on its moistened gusts the doleful vibration of the three strokes.
And in spite of his extraordinary self-control there was a strange vibration in the Gascon's voice which made his partner start.