vibrative


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vi·brate

 (vī′brāt′)
v. vi·brat·ed, vi·brat·ing, vi·brates
v.intr.
1.
a. To move back and forth or to and fro, especially rhythmically and rapidly: The eardrum vibrates in response to sound waves. See Synonyms at swing.
b. To progress in a given direction while moving back and forth rapidly: The sound wave vibrated through the water.
2. To be in a state of great activity, excitement, or agitation: "Even as the film moved ... to the more deadly fields of Vietnam, old hatreds vibrated in me" (Loudon Wainwright).
3. To produce a sound; resonate: "The noise of cars and motorcycles, voices and music vibrates from the street" (Edmundo Paz Solden).
4. To fluctuate or waver, as between states or in making choices: "The fear of repetition and the lure of repetition: these are the two poles between which the movie vibrates" (Wendy Lesser).
v.tr.
1. To cause to move back and forth rapidly: The rattlesnake vibrated its tail.
2. To produce (sound) by vibration.
n.
A setting on a cell phone that causes the phone to shake rapidly without producing a ringtone when a call or text message is received.

[Latin vibrāre, vibrāt-; see weip- in Indo-European roots.]

vi′bra·tive, vi′bra·to′ry (-brə-tôr′ē) adj.

vibrative

(ˈvaɪbrətɪv)
adj
vibrating
Translations

vi·bra·tive

, vibratory
a. vibratorio-a, que produce vibración u oscila;
___ sensesentido ___.
References in periodicals archive ?
The system, dubbed Vibrative, uses the three-dimensional accelerometer in Apple's smartphone to measure the characteristics of each tap on the table.