vicar


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vic·ar

 (vĭk′ər)
n.
1.
a. An Anglican parish priest in a parish where historically someone other than the priest was entitled to the tithes.
b. A cleric in charge of a chapel in the Episcopal Church of the United States.
2. An Anglican or Roman Catholic cleric who acts for or represents another, often higher-ranking member of the clergy.

[Middle English, from Old French vicaire, from Latin vicārius, vicarious, a substitute, from vicis, genitive of *vix, change; see weik- in Indo-European roots.]

vic′ar·ship′ n.

vicar

(ˈvɪkə)
n
1. (Anglicanism) Church of England
a. (in Britain) a clergyman appointed to act as priest of a parish from which, formerly, he did not receive tithes but a stipend
b. a clergyman who acts as assistant to or substitute for the rector of a parish at Communion
c. (in the US) a clergyman in charge of a chapel
2. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a bishop or priest representing the pope or the ordinary of a diocese and exercising a limited jurisdiction
3. (Anglicanism) Church of England Also called: lay vicar or vicar choral a member of a cathedral choir appointed to sing certain parts of the services
4. a person appointed to do the work of another
[C13: from Old French vicaire, from Latin vicārius (n) a deputy, from vicārius (adj) vicarious]
ˈvicarly adj

vic•ar

(ˈvɪk ər)

n.
1. a cleric in the Anglican Church acting as priest of a parish in place of the rector.
2. a cleric in the Episcopal Church whose charge is a chapel in a parish.
3. a Roman Catholic ecclesiastic representing a bishop.
4. a person who is authorized to perform the functions of another; deputy.
[1250–1300; < Old French vicaire < Latin vicārius a substitute, n. use of adj.; see vicarious]
vic′ar•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vicar - a Roman Catholic priest who acts for another higher-ranking clergymanvicar - a Roman Catholic priest who acts for another higher-ranking clergyman
priest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders
2.vicar - (Episcopal Church) a clergyman in charge of a chapelvicar - (Episcopal Church) a clergyman in charge of a chapel
Protestant Episcopal Church, Episcopal Church - United States church that is in communication with the see of Canterbury
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
3.vicar - (Church of England) a clergyman appointed to act as priest of a parishvicar - (Church of England) a clergyman appointed to act as priest of a parish
Anglican Church, Anglican Communion, Church of England - the national church of England (and all other churches in other countries that share its beliefs); has its see in Canterbury and the sovereign as its temporal head
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church

vicar

Translations
قَسّكاهِن رَعِيَّه
farářvikář
præst
pastori
vikar
sóknarprestur
教区牧師
교구 목사
kunigas
vikārs
kyrkoherde
พระในคริสต์ศาสนา
cha sứ

vicar

[ˈvɪkəʳ] N (gen) → vicario m; (Anglican) → cura m, párroco m

vicar

[ˈvɪkər] npasteur m (de l'Église anglicane)
He's a vicar → Il est pasteur.

vicar

nPfarrer(in) m(f); good evening, vicarguten Abend, Herr Pfarrer/Frau Pfarrerin

vicar

[ˈvɪkəʳ] n (Church of England) → pastore m; (Roman Catholic) → vicario

vicar

(ˈvikə) noun
a clergyman of the Church of England.
ˈvicarage (-ridʒ) noun
the house of a vicar.

vicar

قَسّ farář præst Pfarrer εφημέριος cura párroco pastori vicaire vikar vicario 教区牧師 교구 목사 predikant sogneprest pastor vigário викарий kyrkoherde พระในคริสต์ศาสนา papaz yardımcısı cha sứ 教区牧师
References in classic literature ?
The Vicar himself seemed to wear rather a changed aspect, as most men do when acquaintances made elsewhere see them for the first time in their own homes; some indeed showing like an actor of genial parts disadvantageously cast for the curmudgeon in a new piece.
My mother is like old George the Third," said the Vicar, "she objects to metaphysics.
This was only used by visitors and on Sundays, and on special occasions, as when the Vicar went up to London or came back.
It was a large black stove that stood in the hall and was only lighted if the weather was very bad and the Vicar had a cold.
I told him that the vicar had married my mother's sister, and that the two had been father and mother to me since the death of my parents.
The vicar had naturally questioned him about his family.
This lady had somewhat unexpectedly brought him three sons, so that between Angel, the youngest, and his father the Vicar there seemed to be almost a missing generation.
The Vicar having opened it and found it to contain a book, read a few pages; whereupon he jumped up from his seat and went straight to the shop with the book under his arm.
He and the vicar had run up a sudden friendship, on the strength of their common enthusiasm for the old-fashioned game of backgammon.
I only remain behind to go to the vicar (who is also the magistrate here), and declare myself your husband.
The book I mean is called The Vicar of Wakefield, and it was written by Oliver Goldsmith.
The novel which thus set Goldsmith free for the moment was the famous Vicar of Wakefield.