vicious


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vi·cious

 (vĭsh′əs)
adj.
1. Mean-spirited or deliberately hurtful; malicious: vicious gossip.
2.
a. Extremely violent or injurious; cruel: a vicious blow to the stomach; vicious tactics in suppressing a rebellion.
b. Marked by an aggressive disposition. Used chiefly of animals.
c. Disposed to violent or destructive behavior: a vicious dictator.
3. Severe, powerful, or intense; fierce: a vicious storm.
4.
a. Having the nature of vice; evil, immoral, or depraved: "All men who succeed ... in finance in New York at last ... return to their native towns, assert that cities are vicious, marry their childhood sweethearts" (Sinclair Lewis).
b. Given to vice, immorality, or depravity: "The sum and substance of it was, That Oliver was a foundling, born of low and vicious parents" (Charles Dickens).
5. Faulty or defective: a forced, vicious style of prose.

[Middle English, from Old French vicieus, from Latin vitiōsus, from vitium, vice.]

vi′cious·ly adv.
vi′cious·ness n.

vicious

(ˈvɪʃəs)
adj
1. wicked or cruel; villainous: a vicious thug.
2. characterized by violence or ferocity: a vicious blow.
3. informal unpleasantly severe; harsh: a vicious wind.
4. characterized by malice: vicious lies.
5. (esp of dogs, horses, etc) ferocious or hostile; dangerous
6. characterized by or leading to vice
7. invalidated by defects; unsound: a vicious inference.
8. obsolete noxious or morbid: a vicious exhalation.
[C14: from Old French vicieus, from Latin vitiōsus full of faults, from vitium a defect]
ˈviciously adv
ˈviciousness n

vi•cious

(ˈvɪʃ əs)

adj.
1. addicted to or characterized by vice; immoral or evil; depraved.
2. spiteful; malicious: vicious gossip.
3. unpleasantly severe or intense: a vicious headache.
4. savage; ferocious: a vicious temper.
5. (of an animal) unruly, fierce, or of a violent disposition.
6. characterized by faults or defects; unsound: vicious reasoning.
7. morbid, foul, or noxious.
[1300–50; < Latin vitiōsus, derivative of viti(um) fault, vice1]
vi′cious•ly, adv.
vi′cious•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.vicious - (of persons or their actions) able or disposed to inflict pain or sufferingvicious - (of persons or their actions) able or disposed to inflict pain or suffering; "a barbarous crime"; "brutal beatings"; "cruel tortures"; "Stalin's roughshod treatment of the kulaks"; "a savage slap"; "vicious kicks"
inhumane - lacking and reflecting lack of pity or compassion; "humans are innately inhumane; this explains much of the misery and suffering in the world"; "biological weapons are considered too inhumane to be used"
2.vicious - having the nature of vicevicious - having the nature of vice    
wicked - morally bad in principle or practice
3.vicious - bringing or deserving severe rebuke or censure; "a criminal waste of talent"; "a deplorable act of violence"; "adultery is as reprehensible for a husband as for a wife"
wrong - contrary to conscience or morality or law; "it is wrong for the rich to take advantage of the poor"; "cheating is wrong"; "it is wrong to lie"
4.vicious - marked by deep ill will; deliberately harmful; "poisonous hate"; "venomous criticism"; "vicious gossip"
malicious - having the nature of or resulting from malice; "malicious gossip"; "took malicious pleasure in...watching me wince"- Rudyard Kipling

vicious

adjective
1. savage, brutal, violent, bad, dangerous, foul, cruel, ferocious, monstrous, vile, atrocious, diabolical, heinous, abhorrent, barbarous, fiendish He suffered a vicious attack by a gang of youths.
savage kind, friendly, gentle, tame, playful, docile
3. malicious, vindictive, spiteful, mean, cruel, venomous, bitchy (informal), defamatory, rancorous, backbiting, slanderous a vicious attack on an innocent woman's character
malicious complimentary, appreciative, congratulatory

vicious

adjective
1. Morally objectionable:
2. Characterized by intense ill will or spite:
Slang: bitchy.
3. So intense as to cause extreme suffering:
4. Showing or suggesting a disposition to be violently destructive without scruple or restraint:
Translations
أَثِيمقاسٍ، شِرّير، مُحْتَمَل أن يُهاجِم
krutýútočnýzlý
ondskabsfuld
raju
okrutan
illviljaîur; grimmur
ひどい
나쁜
niršus
ļaunsnikns
hudobenizprijenpokvarjen
illvillig
ที่ร้ายแรง
xấu xa

vicious

[ˈvɪʃəs]
A. ADJ
1. (= brutal) [person, gang] → despiadado; [attack, assault, crime] → atroz, brutal; [animal] → agresivo, fiero
a vicious-looking knifeun cuchillo de aspecto horrorífico
2. (= malicious) [criticism, campaign] → despiadado, cruel; [remark] → malicioso
to have a vicious tempertener muy mal genio
to have a vicious tonguetener una lengua viperina
B. CPD vicious circle Ncírculo m vicioso
to be caught in a vicious circleestar atrapado en un círculo vicioso

vicious

[ˈvɪʃəs] adj
(= brutal) [person, attack, assault, murder, crime] → brutal(e); [blow] → vicieux/euse; [gang] → violent(e)
(= ferocious) [dog] → vicieux/euse
(= malicious) [remark, letter] → acerbe; [lie] → cruel(le); [campaign] → odieux/eusevicious circle ncercle m vicieux

vicious

adj
animalbösartig; dogbissig; blow, kick, gang, attack, crime, criminalbrutal; murdergrauenhaft, brutal; campaignbösartig, gemein; that animal can be viciousdas Tier kann heimtückisch sein; to have a vicious temperjähzornig sein
(= nasty)gemein, boshaft; remarkboshaft, gehässig; lookboshaft, böse; to have a vicious tongueeine böse or spitze Zunge haben
habitlasterhaft
(inf: = strong, nasty) headachefies (inf), → gemein (inf)

vicious

[ˈvɪʃəs] adj (attack) → brutale; (blow, kick) → dato/a con cattiveria, violento/a; (animal) → cattivo/a; (remark, criticism) → crudele; (glare) → malevolo/a, d'odio; (tongue) → velenoso/a
a vicious habit → un vizio

vicious

(ˈviʃəs) adjective
evil; cruel; likely to attack or cause harm. Keep back from that dog – it's vicious.
ˈviciously adverb
ˈviciousness noun

vicious

أَثِيم krutý ondskabsfuld bösartig διεστραμμένος fiero raju vicieux okrutan brutale ひどい 나쁜 wreed ondsinnet bezwzględny violento порочный illvillig ที่ร้ายแรง kötü xấu xa 恶意的

vicious

a. [ridden by vice] vicioso-a, depravado-a;
adv. viciosamente, malvadamente.
References in classic literature ?
Ambrosch's feet had scarcely touched the ground when he lunged out with a vicious kick at Jake's stomach.
This paper looks to me as if it KNEW what a vicious influence it had!
He was, in fact, noted for preferring vicious animals, given to all kinds of tricks which kept the rider in constant risk of his neck, for he held a tractable, wellbroken horse as unworthy of a lad of spirit.
Of these professional tramps a great many had, of course, been shiftless and vicious all their lives.
It takes no spectacles to see that a great class of vicious, improvident, degraded people, among us, are an evil to us, as well as to themselves.
So I presently hurled a shoe at random, and with a vicious vigor.
She was merely his chattel now, his convenience, his dog, his cringing and helpless slave, the humble and unresisting victim of his capricious temper and vicious nature.
At last the enemy's mother appeared, and called Tom a bad, vicious, vulgar child, and ordered him away.
Thus, when the slave asks for virtuous freedom, the cunning slaveholder, knowing his ig- norance, cheats him with a dose of vicious dissi- pation, artfully labelled with the name of liberty.
Brocklehurst to apprise Miss Temple and the teachers of my vicious nature.
Don't get the expression of a vicious cur that appears to know the kicks it gets are its desert, and yet hates all the world, as well as the kicker, for what it suffers.
After that he scarcely ever saw him except when he was asleep, and all he knew of him was that he was a confirmed invalid, with a vicious, hysterical, half-insane temper.