videotext


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vid·e·o·tex

 (vĭd′ē-ō-tĕks′) also vid·e·o·text (-tĕkst′)
n.
An information service in which data is transmitted over television cables or telephone lines and displayed on a television or computer screen.

videotext

(ˈvɪdɪəʊˌtɛkst)
n
(Computer Science) a means of providing a written or graphical representation of computerized information on a television screen
Translations

videotext

[ˈvɪdɪəʊˌtekst] Nvideotexto m
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References in periodicals archive ?
He focuses on the Internet in relation to the response of newspapers to early videotext experiments and the rise of cable television.
Thomas Clark, former State Mathematics Supervisor for the Indiana Department of Education and founder of VideoText Interactive, helps parents brainstorm strategies for helping their kids become critical learners.
Some examples of auxiliary aids include qualified interpreters, note-takers, computer-aided transcription services, written materials, telephone handset amplifiers, assistive listening systems, telephones compatible with hearing aids, closed caption decoders, open and closed captioning, telecommunications devices for deaf persons (TDD's), videotext displays, and exchange of written notes.
Son and McCombs (1993) revisited PRC under the circumstances of restless media market with the entrance of pay cable, VCRs, videodisc players, and videotext, especially the first two successful media.
Should a patient not agree that written notes are sufficient, other alternatives can be offered: computer transcription, assisted listening devices, videotext displays (often available in hospitals), and telecommunication devices such as TTY and TDD.
In July of the same year, Jerome Ellig of Citizens for a Sound Economy worried that regulatory hurdles were slowing the spread of videotext services into homes.
Programme makers at production company VideoText Communications say the footage will not be used and no decision had been made on whether to film a new jousting tournament for the programme.
This supplemental videotext program teaches upper elementary students core science concepts.
It states that qualified interpreters, notetakers, computer-aided transcription services, written materials, telephone handset amplifiers, assistive listening devices, telephones compatible with hearing aids, closed-caption decoders, open and closed captioning, telecommunication devices for deaf people (TDDs), videotext displays or other effective methods of making aurally delivered materials must be available to individuals with hearing impairments (28 C.
videotext displays, or other effective methods of making aurally delivered materials available to individuals with hearing impairments
Irving Louis Horowitz's] sociological study of publishing (1986) saw the emergence of a "multi-tiered system: one based on both hard copy and videotext (or video-disc) information bases.