vigil


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Related to vigil: Vigil Mass, Easter Vigil

vig·il

 (vĭj′əl)
n.
1.
a. A watch kept during normal sleeping hours.
b. The act or a period of observing; surveillance.
2. The eve of a religious festival observed by staying awake as a devotional exercise.
3. often vigils Ritual devotions observed on the eve of a holy day.

[Middle English vigile, a devotional watching, from Old French, from Latin vigilia, wakefulness, watch, from vigil, awake; see weg- in Indo-European roots.]

vigil

(ˈvɪdʒɪl)
n
1. a purposeful watch maintained, esp at night, to guard, observe, pray, etc
2. the period of such a watch
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) RC Church Church of England the eve of certain major festivals, formerly observed as a night spent in prayer: often marked by fasting and abstinence and a special Mass and divine office
4. (Pathology) a period of sleeplessness; insomnia
[C13: from Old French vigile, from Medieval Latin vigilia watch preceding a religious festival, from Latin: vigilance, from vigil alert, from vigēre to be lively]

vig•il

(ˈvɪdʒ əl)

n.
1. wakefulness maintained for any reason during the normal hours for sleeping.
2. a period of watchful attention.
3.
a. Sometimes, vigils. a nocturnal devotional exercise or service, esp. on the eve of a church festival.
b. the eve or day and night before a church festival, esp. an eve that is a fast.
[1200–50; Middle English vigil(i)e < Medieval Latin vigilia eve of a holy day, Latin: watchfulness =vigil sentry + -ia -y3]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vigil - a period of sleeplessness
wakefulness - a periodic state during which you are conscious and aware of the world; "consciousness during wakefulness in a sane person is pretty well ordered and familiar"
2.vigil - the rite of staying awake for devotional purposes (especially on the eve of a religious festival)vigil - the rite of staying awake for devotional purposes (especially on the eve of a religious festival)
religious rite, rite - an established ceremony prescribed by a religion; "the rite of baptism"
viewing, wake - a vigil held over a corpse the night before burial; "there's no weeping at an Irish wake"
agrypnia - a vigil before certain feasts (as e.g. Easter)
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
3.vigil - a purposeful surveillance to guard or observevigil - a purposeful surveillance to guard or observe
surveillance - close observation of a person or group (usually by the police)
continuous receiver watch, listening watch - a watch established for the reception of traffic of interest to the unit maintaining the watch
spying - keeping a secret or furtive watch

vigil

noun
The act of carefully watching:
Idiom: watch and ward.
Translations
aatto
bdijenjebdjenje

vigil

[ˈvɪdʒɪl] Nvigilia f, vela f
to keep vigil (over sth/sb)velar (algo/a algn)

vigil

[ˈvɪdʒɪl] nveille f
to hold a vigil → manifester en silence
to keep vigil → veiller

vigil

n
(Nacht)wache f; to keep vigil over somebodybei jdm wachen; the dog kept vigil over his injured masterder Hund hielt bei seinem verletzten Herrn Wache; her long vigils at his bedsideihr langes Wachen an seinem Krankenbett
(Rel) → Vigil f, → Nachtwache f

vigil

[ˈvɪdʒɪl] nveglia
to keep vigil → vegliare

vig·il

n. vigilia.
1. estado de respuesta consciente a un estímulo;
2. insomnio.
References in classic literature ?
Never had the sun risen so beautifully, and never had the world seemed so lovely as it did to the heavy eyes of Meg and Jo, as they looked out in the early morning, when their long, sad vigil was done.
At least, we would gladly forewarn the unsuspecting girl that there is nothing in human shape or substance to receive her, unless it be the figure of Judge Pyncheon, who--wretched spectacle that he is, and frightful in our remembrance, since our night-long vigil with him
About noon he went to the police station to make inquiries, and then came back again for another anxious vigil.
My gardian angel is asleep At leest he doth no vigil keep
Something more potent than that,'' answered the Jester; ``for when would repentance or prayer make Gurth do a courtesy, or fasting or vigil persuade him to lend you a mule?
In vain do I call, through my vigil weary, On creation and its Lord
The lioness fretted about the bole of the tree for a short time; but finally, either realizing the uselessness of her vigil, or prompted by the pangs of hunger, she stalked majestically away and disappeared in the brush that hid her lord, who had not once shown himself during the altercation.
I was firm, however, and made preparations for my long vigil.
But I was too restless to watch long; I am too Occidental for a long vigil.
In spite of all that has happened since, I still remember that vigil very distinctly: the black and silent observatory, the shadowed lantern throwing a feeble glow upon the floor in the corner, the steady ticking of the clockwork of the tele- scope, the little slit in the roof--an oblong profundity with the stardust streaked across it.
One evening, after a day of accustomed vigil at the angle of two roads leading to Marseilles from the Catalans, she returned to her home more depressed than ever.
At the end of the first vigil, she noticed that the face had taken on a yellow tinge, the lips grew blue, the nose grew pinched, the eyes were sunken.