villainy


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vil·lain·y

 (vĭl′ə-nē)
n. pl. vil·lain·ies
1. Villainous conduct or action: "He made the excuse that a seaman, being under strict discipline, had few opportunities for villainy" (P.D. James).
2. A villainous act: outraged by their villainies.

villainy

(ˈvɪlənɪ)
n, pl -lainies
1. conduct befitting a villain; vicious behaviour or action
2. an evil, abhorrent, or criminal act or deed
3. the fact or condition of being villainous
4. (Historical Terms) English history a rare word for villeinage

vil•lain•y

(ˈvɪl ə ni)

n., pl. -lain•ies.
1. the actions or conduct of a villain; outrageous wickedness.
2. a villainous act or deed.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.villainy - the quality of evil by virtue of villainous behaviorvillainy - the quality of evil by virtue of villainous behavior
evilness, evil - the quality of being morally wrong in principle or practice; "attempts to explain the origin of evil in the world"
2.villainy - a criminal or vicious actvillainy - a criminal or vicious act    
evildoing, transgression - the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"

villainy

noun wickedness, crime, vice, sin, atrocity, delinquency, criminality, depravity, iniquity, turpitude, baseness, devilry, knavery, rascality They justify their villainy in the name of their high ideals.

villainy

noun
Translations
دنائَه، نَذالَه
ničemnost
slyngelagtighed
òorparaskapur, illmennska
ničomnosť
alçaklıkzalimlik

villainy

[ˈvɪlənɪ] N (esp poet) → maldad f, vileza f

villainy

villainy

[ˈvɪlənɪ] nscelleratezza

villain

(ˈvilən) noun
a person who is wicked or of very bad character. the villain of the play/story.
ˈvillainous adjective
ˈvillainyplural ˈvillainies noun
(an instance of) wickedness. His villainy was well known.
References in classic literature ?
I had a mind to slip away, but concluded I wouldn't; I would stand my ground, and confront the villainy, whatever it was.
For a whole week he was not able to sleep well, so much the villainy which he had played upon his trusting mother preyed upon his rag of conscience; but after that he began to get comfortable again, and was presently able to sleep like any other miscreant.
Though aware, before she began it, that it must bring a confession of his inconstancy, and confirm their separation for ever, she was not aware that such language could be suffered to announce it; nor could she have supposed Willoughby capable of departing so far from the appearance of every honourable and delicate feeling--so far from the common decorum of a gentleman, as to send a letter so impudently cruel: a letter which, instead of bringing with his desire of a release any professions of regret, acknowledged no breach of faith, denied all peculiar affection whatever-- a letter of which every line was an insult, and which proclaimed its writer to be deep in hardened villainy.
But, the gaol was a vile place, in which most kinds of debauchery and villainy were practised, and where dire diseases were bred, that came into court with the prisoners, and sometimes rushed straight from the dock at my Lord Chief Justice himself, and pulled him off the bench.
Villainy is the matter; baseness is the matter; deception, fraud, conspiracy, are the matter; and the name of the whole atrocious mass is - HEEP
But I will proclaim thy villainy, Templar, from one end of Europe to the other.
That is not true, by all that's good," said Don Quixote in high wrath, turning upon him angrily, as his way was; "and it is a very great slander, or rather villainy.
And now I depart hence condemned by you to suffer the penalty of death,--they too go their ways condemned by the truth to suffer the penalty of villainy and wrong; and I must abide by my award--let them abide by theirs.
That part of his scheme was crude and brutal--it lacked the refinement of torture that had marked the master strokes of the Paulvitch of old, when he had worked with that virtuoso of villainy, Nikolas Rokoff--but it at least assured Paulvitch of immunity from responsibility, placing that upon the ape, who would thus also be punished for his refusal longer to support the Russian.
I know it, for now and then, I hear a far-away muffled sound as of mattock and spade, and, whatever it is, it must be the end of some ruthless villainy.
I wondered vaguely what foul villainy it might be that the Morlocks did under the new moon.
One morning, though I had never tried my hand with the pen, it suddenly occurred to me to write a satire on this officer in the form of a novel which would unmask his villainy.