synovitis

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sy·no·vi·tis

 (sī′nə-vī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of a synovial membrane.

[New Latin synovium, synovia-secreting membrane (from synovia) + -itis.]

synovitis

(ˌsaɪnəʊˈvaɪtɪs; ˌsɪn-)
n
(Pathology) inflammation of the membrane surrounding a joint
synovitic adj

syn•o•vi•tis

(ˌsɪn əˈvaɪ tɪs)

n.
inflammation of a synovial membrane.
[1823–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.synovitis - inflammation of the synovial membrane that lines a synovial joint; results in pain and swelling
inflammation, redness, rubor - a response of body tissues to injury or irritation; characterized by pain and swelling and redness and heat
tendonous synovitis, tendosynovitis, tenosynovitis - inflammation of a tendon and its enveloping sheath
Translations

syn·o·vi·tis

n. sinovitis, infl. de la membrana sinovial;
dry ______ seca;
purulent ______ purulenta;
serous ______ serosa.

synovitis

n sinovitis f
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) -- a group of neoplasms including pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS) -- is a rare, usually non-metastatic tumor that affects the synovium-lined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths, resulting in swelling, pain, stiffness and reduced mobility in the affected joint or limb.
She mentioned that she underwent right knee operation due to pigmented villonodular synovitis three years ago.
About TGCT Tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) -- a group of neoplasms including pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS) -- is a rare, usually non-metastatic tumor that affects the synovium-lined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths, resulting in swelling, pain, stiffness and reduced mobility in the affected joint or limb.
Giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) and pigmented villonodular synovitis belong to the same type of benign proliferative lesions originating in the synovia that usually affect the joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths.
Differential diagnosis includes osteoarthritis, Perthe's disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, hemophilia, pseudogout, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.
Intra-articular injected beta-emitting radionuclides are indicated in chronic synovitis with recurrent joint effusions in rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, villonodular synovitis after surgery and haemarthrosis in haemophilia.
Additionally, inflammatory joint diseases, fractures of the femoral neck, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, pigmented villonodular synovitis and synovial chondromatosis should also be taken into consideration (9,13,14).
These findings suggest several possible differential diagnoses: soft tissue sarcoma, metastatic lesion, pigmented villonodular synovitis, infection, and myositis.
While innumerable intraarticular processes can mimic masses, the few that should be considered in the same discussion as synovial metastasis include granulomatous septic arthritis (particularly tuberculous and fungal), proliferative articular processes like pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and deposition disease such as gout or pseudogout.
This is an example of intra-articular, localized TSGCT, also known as localized pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS).
Abstract: This report describes a 9-year-old girl with pigmented villonodular synovitis of the right knee.
CASE FACTS: Russell Smith had a rare condition known as Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS) in his right knee.