vindication


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vin·di·ca·tion

 (vĭn′dĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1. The act of vindicating or condition of being vindicated.
2. Something that provides evidence or support for a claim or argument: "The swim was a vindication of women's capability as athletes" (Glenn Stout).

vindication

(ˌvɪndɪˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. the act of vindicating or the condition of being vindicated
2. a means of exoneration from an accusation
3. a fact, evidence, circumstance, etc, that serves to vindicate a theory or claim

vin•di•ca•tion

(ˌvɪn dɪˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of vindicating or the state of being vindicated.
2. an excuse or justification.
3. something that vindicates.
[1475–85; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vindication - the act of vindicating or defending against criticism or censure etc.; "friends provided a vindication of his position"
justification - the act of defending or explaining or making excuses for by reasoning; "the justification of barbarous means by holy ends"- H.J.Muller
rehabilitation - vindication of a person's character and the re-establishment of that person's reputation
clearing - the act of freeing from suspicion
2.vindication - the justification for some act or belief; "he offered a persuasive defense of the theory"
justification - a statement in explanation of some action or belief
apologia, apology - a formal written defense of something you believe in strongly
alibi - (law) a defense by an accused person purporting to show that he or she could not have committed the crime in question
exculpation, excuse, self-justification, alibi - a defense of some offensive behavior or some failure to keep a promise etc.; "he kept finding excuses to stay"; "every day he had a new alibi for not getting a job"; "his transparent self-justification was unacceptable"

vindication

noun
1. exoneration, pardon, acquittal, dismissal, discharge, amnesty, absolution, exculpating, exculpation He insisted on a complete vindication from the libel jury.
2. support, defence, ratification, excuse, apology, justification, assertion, substantiation He called the success a vindication of his party's economic policy.

vindication

noun
1. A freeing or clearing from accusation or guilt:
Law: acquittal.
2. A statement that justifies or defends something, such as a past action or policy:
Translations

vindication

[ˌvɪndɪˈkeɪʃən] Njustificación f; [of claim, right] → reivindicación f, defensa f; (= means of exoneration) → vindicación f (frm)
it was a vindication of all she had fought forsuponía una justificación de todo aquello por lo que había luchado

vindication

[ˌvɪndɪˈkeɪʃən] nlégitimation f

vindication

n
(of opinion, action, decision)Rechtfertigung f; in vindication ofzur Rechtfertigung (+gen)
(= exoneration)Rehabilitation f

vindication

[ˌvɪndɪˈkeɪʃn] ngiustificazione f
in vindication of → a conferma di
References in classic literature ?
A quiet smile lighted the haughty features of the young Mohican, betraying his knowledge of the English language as well as of the other's meaning; but he suffered it to pass away without vindication of reply.
It was now far too late in Clifford's life for the good opinion of society to be worth the trouble and anguish of a formal vindication.
What I got from Sheridan was a bold denunciation of slav- ery, and a powerful vindication of human rights.
Not that Marianne appeared to distrust the truth of any part of it, for she listened to it all with the most steady and submissive attention, made neither objection nor remark, attempted no vindication of Willoughby, and seemed to shew by her tears that she felt it to be impossible.
These alleged in vindication of their opinions that it was reasonable to expect, if they put us to death, that the viceroy of the Indies would come with fire and sword to demand satisfaction.
At this day it cannot but strike us as extraordinary, that it does not appear to have occurred to any one member of that assembly, which had laid down in terms so clear, so explicit, so unequivocal, the foundation of all just government, in the imprescriptible rights of man, and the transcendent sovereignty of the people, and who in those principles had set forth their only personal vindication from the charges of rebellion against their king, and of treason to their country, that their last crowning act was still to be performed upon the same principles.
The dedication of himself to the improvement of his fellow-citizens is not so remarkable as the ironical spirit in which he goes about doing good only in vindication of the credit of the oracle, and in the vain hope of finding a wiser man than himself.
Hitherto my observations have only aimed at a vindication of the provision in question, on the ground of theoretic propriety, on that of the danger of placing the power elsewhere, and on that of the safety of placing it in the manner proposed.
In short, he could not have wished for a more complete vindication.
Nor was Darcy's vindication, though grateful to her feelings, capable of consoling her for such discovery.
He said something to his warriors explanatory of this singular posture of affairs, and in vindication, perhaps, of the pacific temper of his son-in-law.
Because my time," pursues Sir Leicester, "is wholly at your disposal with a view to the vindication of the outraged majesty of the law.