vinedresser

vine·dress·er

 (vīn′drĕs′ər)
n.
A person who cultivates and prunes grapevines.

vinedresser

(ˈvaɪnˌdrɛsə)
n
1. (Professions) a person who prunes, tends, or cultivates grapevines
2. (Agriculture) a person who prunes, tends, or cultivates grapevines
Translations

vinedresser

nWinzer(in) m(f)
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References in periodicals archive ?
God is the vinedresser, who with immense love tends and protects the vine; let us be moved by his watchful gaze.
5) In John 15:1-27, we find a related agricultural metaphor in the vinedresser pruning away moribund or nonproductive branches.
CE (I assume a single figure named Philostratus) holds interest for those interested in fictional romance: the Lives of the Sophists (regarding the so-called Second Sophistic), The Life of Apollonius of Tyana, the wonder-worker who travelled throughout Greece, Asia Minor, India and elsewhere, and the Heroicus, the brilliantly bizarre account of a Phoenician merchant meeting a Greek vinedresser, who through contact with his patron, the thrice-born Protesilaos, has remarkable access to the true story of what happened at Troy and its heroes.
Two daughters of a Borsch vinedresser, Jorg Offenbach, and their colleague, Ottilia, displayed singular courage when arrested by the Cathedral Chapter.
Sutera draws on her forty years of experience as the caretaker of her monastery's garden to describe in easily understandable yet profound ways the intricacies of the relationship needed between the vinedresser and the vines.
Amos responds by mocking Amaziah, saying that he cannot be fired since he does not work for the king; he is a normal person, a sheepherder and a vinedresser, called by God to pronounce judgment upon Israel.
But I am pondering Jesus saying to his disciples, "I am the true vine, and my Father is the vinedresser.
The above-cited passage--in the form of a dialogue between the Vinedresser and the Phoenician--reads as follows: (1)
In "The Tax Gatherer," Bastiat describes a conversation between a vinedresser named Jacques Bonhomme (the French version of "Joe Sixpack") and Monsieur LaSouche, the tax collector.
The vine refers to Christian conduct vis-a-vis the vine and vinedresser and the vineyard--the Christian scheme of salvation and damnation.
The vinedresser overcomes the doubts of the Phoenician by offering manifest proofs of the existence of the Homeric heroes.
St John refers to God as the vinedresser caring for, but also pruning, the plant.