violence


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Related to violence: domestic violence, School violence

vi·o·lence

 (vī′ə-ləns)
n.
1. Behavior or treatment in which physical force is exerted for the purpose of causing damage or injury: the violence of the rioters.
2.
a. Intense force or great power, as in natural phenomena: the violence of a tornado.
b. Extreme or powerful emotion or expression: the violence of their tirades.
3. Distortion of meaning or intent: do violence to a text.

violence

(ˈvaɪələns)
n
1. the exercise or an instance of physical force, usually effecting or intended to effect injuries, destruction, etc
2. powerful, untamed, or devastating force: the violence of the sea.
3. great strength of feeling, as in language, etc; fervour
4. an unjust, unwarranted, or unlawful display of force, esp such as tends to overawe or intimidate
5. do violence to
a. to inflict harm upon; damage or violate: they did violence to the prisoners.
b. to distort or twist the sense or intention of: the reporters did violence to my speech.
[C13: via Old French from Latin violentia impetuosity, from violentus violent]

vi•o•lence

(ˈvaɪ ə ləns)

n.
1. swift and intense force.
2. rough or injurious physical force, action, or treatment.
3. an unjust or unwarranted exertion of force or power.
4. a violent act or proceeding.
5. rough or immoderate vehemence, as of feeling or language.
6. damage, as through distortion of meaning or fact: to do violence to a translation.

Violence

 

See Also: ADVANCING, BEHAVIOR

  1. Battered to and fro as a rat is shaken by a dog —Rudyard Kipling
  2. Came after him like an antelope —William Diehl
  3. Came at him like a kamikaze —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  4. Cored him like an apple —John Yount
  5. Dealt out blows with the precision of a punch press —Natascha Wodin
  6. Drove his fist straight in like a saber thrust —Joseph Wambaugh
  7. Grabbed hold of me, as a cat grabs a mouse —George Garrett
  8. Hit it [a man’s chin] as if I was driving the last spike on the first transcontinental railroad —Raymond Chandler
  9. Hit like a tank —Ken Stabler and Berry Stainback
  10. Howling and clawing at each other like wild beasts in heat —Hunter S. Thompson
  11. I can flatten him out like a crepe in a frying-pan —Henry Van Dyke
  12. I could slice you down like cold meat before you could whisper Mercy —Davis Grubb

    In Grubb’s novel, The Golden Sickle, the man making this threat is wielding a knife.

  13. I’ll crush his ribs in like a rotten hazelnut —Emily Bronte
  14. I’m gonna pop your eyes like busted eggs —William Kennedy
  15. Knocked to the ground like a winged partridge —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  16. Lunged [into the midst of group of people] like a whirlwind on a summer’s day —Flannery O’Connor
  17. [Mobster Sam Giancana, who) ordered killings as easily as he ordered linguini —Kitty Kelley
  18. The propensity for violence exists like a layer of buried molten magma underlying all human topography —Robert Ardrey
  19. Put me in an arm lock as easily as he might twist a soft pretzel —James Crumley
  20. Showered her blows … with the force and rapidity of a drummer beating his drum —Guy De Maupassant
  21. Slapped her like a volleyball —Rochelle Ratner
  22. Terorism is a natural by-product of modern life. Like air pollution, family breakdown, excessively casual sexual promiscuity and exaltation of greed —Russell Baker, New York Times, 1986
  23. Threw themselves at him like dogs at a bear —Mikhail Bulgakov
  24. Violence and wrong are as a dream which rolls from steadfast truth, an unreturning stream —Percy Bysshe Shelley
  25. Violence (was an inescapable factor of the heart … ) an ineradicable thing … like a bad seed —William March
  26. Violence in a house is like a worm on vegetables —Hebrew proverb
  27. Violence is as American as cherry pie —Eldridge Cleaver
  28. The violence of my impulses [to harm another person] was still within me, like the sharp end of a splinter improperly removed —Scott Spencer
  29. Violence weighed him down like a pack —Harris Downey
  30. Violent and ruthless as a puppy —James Mills
  31. Violent death is like a monster. The closer you get to it, the more damage you sustain —Sue Grafton
  32. Violent death leaves an aura, like an energy field that repels the observer —Sue Grafton
  33. Was on him like a falling tree —Jerry Bumpus
  34. A wound like a burst fruit —Jean Stafford
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.violence - an act of aggression (as one against a person who resists)violence - an act of aggression (as one against a person who resists); "he may accomplish by craft in the long run what he cannot do by force and violence in the short one"
aggression, hostility - violent action that is hostile and usually unprovoked
domestic violence - violence or physical abuse directed toward your spouse or domestic partner; usually violence by men against women
road rage - violence exhibited by drivers in traffic
public violence, riot - a public act of violence by an unruly mob
2.violence - the property of being wild or turbulentviolence - the property of being wild or turbulent; "the storm's violence"
intensiveness, intensity - high level or degree; the property of being intense
savageness, savagery - the property of being untamed and ferocious; "the coastline is littered with testaments to the savageness of the waters"; "a craving for barbaric splendor, for savagery and color and the throb of drums"
3.violence - a turbulent state resulting in injuries and destruction etc.violence - a turbulent state resulting in injuries and destruction etc.
Sturm und Drang, upheaval, turbulence - a state of violent disturbance and disorder (as in politics or social conditions generally); "the industrial revolution was a period of great turbulence"
rage - violent state of the elements; "the sea hurled itself in thundering rage against the rocks"

violence

noun
1. brutality, bloodshed, savagery, fighting, terrorism, frenzy, thuggery, destructiveness, bestiality, strong-arm tactics (informal), rough handling, bloodthirstiness, murderousness Twenty people were killed in the violence.
2. force, power, strength, might, ferocity, brute force, fierceness, forcefulness, powerfulness The violence of the blow forced the hammer through his skull.
3. intensity, passion, fury, force, cruelty, severity, fervour, sharpness, harshness, vehemence `There's no need,' she snapped with sudden violence.
4. power, turbulence, wildness, raging, tumult, roughness, boisterousness, storminess The house was destroyed in the violence of the storm.
Quotations
"All they that take the sword shall perish with the sword" Bible: St. Matthew
"Violence is one of the most fun things to watch" [Quentin Tarantino at the screening of Pulp Fiction in Cannes]
"Keep violence in the mind"
"Where it belongs" [Brian Aldiss Barefoot in the Head]

violence

noun
1. Power used to overcome resistance:
2. Exceptionally great concentration, power, or force, especially in activity:
Translations
násilíprudkost
voldvoldsomhed
väkivaltaväkivaltaisuudetvääryys
nasiljenepravdasilovitostžestina
ofbeldi, ofsi
暴力曲解歪曲猛威
폭력
nasilje
våld
ความรุนแรง
tính bạo lực
暴力猛烈家庭暴力强烈

violence

[ˈvaɪələns] n
(= physical aggression) → violence f
Twenty people were killed in the violence → Vingt personnes ont été tuées dans cette éruption de violence.
acts of violence → actes de violence
(= force) [feelings, tone, action] → violence f

violence

n
(= forcefulness, strength)Heftigkeit f; (of protest)Schärfe f, → Heftigkeit f; (of speech also)Leidenschaftlichkeit f; the violence of the contrastder krasse Gegensatz; the violence of his tempersein jähzorniges Temperament, seine Jähzornigkeit
(= brutality)Gewalt f; (of people)Gewalttätigkeit f; (of actions)Brutalität f; the violence of his natureseine gewalttätige Art; crime of violenceGewaltverbrechen nt; act of violenceGewalttat f; robbery with violenceRaubüberfall m; an increase in violenceeine Zunahme der Gewalttätigkeit; to use violence against somebodyGewalt gegen jdn anwenden; was there any violence?kam es zu Gewalttätigkeiten?; outbreak of violenceAusbruch mvon Gewalttätigkeiten
(fig) to do violence to somethingetw entstellen; it does violence to the human spiritdas vergewaltigt den gesunden Menschenverstand

violence

[ˈvaɪələns] nviolenza (Pol) → incidenti mpl violenti
outbreaks of violence → episodi di violenza
acts of violence → atti di violenza
robbery with violence → rapina a mano armata
to do violence to sth (fig) → fare violenza a qc

violent

(ˈvaiələnt) adjective
1. having, using, or showing, great force. There was a violent storm at sea; a violent earthquake; He has a violent temper.
2. caused by force. a violent death.
ˈviolently adverb
ˈviolence noun
great roughness and force, often causing severe physical injury or damage. I was amazed at the violence of his temper; She was terrified by the violence of the storm.

violence

عُنْف násilí vold Gewalt βία violencia väkivalta violence nasilje violenza 暴力 폭력 geweld vold przemoc violência насилие våld ความรุนแรง şiddet tính bạo lực 暴力

violence

n. violencia;
domestic ______ familiar.

violence

n violencia; domestic — violencia doméstica; gun — violencia con armas de fuego
References in classic literature ?
As I remember them, what unprotected faces they were; their very roughness and violence made them defenceless.
Victor was the younger son and brother--a tete montee, with a temper which invited violence and a will which no ax could break.
The rich ornaments of his military attire had indeed been repeatedly handled by different individuals of the tribes with eyes expressing a savage longing to possess the baubles; but before the customary violence could be resorted to, a mandate in the authoritative voice of the large warrior, already mentioned, stayed the uplifted hand, and convinced Heyward that they were to be reserved for some object of particular moment.
Here, where the hand of violence shed the blood of the innocent; where the horrid yells of savages, and the groans of the distressed, sounded in our ears, we now hear the praises and adoration of our Creator; where wretched wigwams stood, the miserable abodes of savages, we behold the foundations of cities laid, that, in all probability, will rival the glory of the greatest upon earth.
It is needless to add that the young girls never knew of this act of violence, or the delicacy that kept them in ignorance of it.
The pious clergyman surely would not have uttered words like these had he in the least suspected that the Colonel had been thrust into the other world with the clutch of violence upon his throat.
After her return to the prison, Hester Prynne was found to be in a state of nervous excitement, that demanded constant watchfulness, lest she should perpetrate violence on herself, or do some half-frenzied mischief to the poor babe.
he had much ado to maintain his seat; sometimes slipping on one side, sometimes on another, and sometimes jolted on the high ridge of his horse's backbone, with a violence that he verily feared would cleave him asunder.
Once a vagabond on his own canal, I have received good turns from one of these Canallers; I thank him heartily; would fain be not ungrateful; but it is often one of the prime redeeming qualities of your man of violence, that at times he has as stiff an arm to back a poor stranger in a strait, as to plunder a wealthy one.
But strangest of all is the circumstance, that in more instances than one, when the body has been recovered, not a single mark of violence is discernible; the man being stark dead.
I stumbled, and fell with violence on both my knees.
That first night at the wedding Tamoszius had hardly taken his eyes off her; and later on, when he came to find that she had really the heart of a baby, her voice and her violence ceased to terrify him, and he got the habit of coming to pay her visits on Sunday afternoons.