virago

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vi·ra·go

 (və-rä′gō, -rā′-, vîr′ə-gō′)
n. pl. vi·ra·goes or vi·ra·gos
1. A woman regarded as noisy, scolding, or domineering.
2. A large, strong, courageous woman.

[Latin virāgō, from vir, man; see wī-ro- in Indo-European roots.]

vi·rag′i·nous (və-răj′ə-nəs) adj.

virago

(vɪˈrɑːɡəʊ)
n, pl -goes or -gos
1. a loud, violent, and ill-tempered woman; scold; shrew
2. archaic a strong, brave, or warlike woman; amazon
[Old English, from Latin: a manlike maiden, from vir a man]
viraginous adj
viˈrago-ˌlike adj

vi•ra•go

(vɪˈrɑ goʊ, -ˈreɪ-)

n., pl. -goes, -gos.
1. a loud-voiced, ill-tempered, scolding woman; shrew.
2. Archaic. a woman of strength or spirit.
[before 1000; Middle English, Old English < Latin virāgō=vir man + -āgō suffix expressing association of some kind, here resemblance]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.virago - a noisy or scolding or domineering womanvirago - a noisy or scolding or domineering woman
shrew, termagant - a scolding nagging bad-tempered woman
2.virago - a large strong and aggressive womanvirago - a large strong and aggressive woman
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"

virago

noun harridan, fury, shrew, vixen, scold, battle-axe (informal), termagant (rare), Xanthippe, ballbreaker (slang) Violent wives are too easily dismissed as hysterical, man-hating viragos.

virago

noun
A person, traditionally a woman, who persistently nags or criticizes:
Informal: battle-ax.
Translations

virago

[vɪˈrɑːgəʊ] N (viragoes or viragos (pl)) → fiera f, arpía f

virago

nXanthippe f

virago

[vɪˈrɑːgəʊ] n (frm, pej) → virago f
References in periodicals archive ?
I once tried to pitch the idea of a multiple-author anthology of fiction about old women kicking butt, acting up and generally being the revolutionary viragoes that old women can be, but I couldn't get a publisher to bite," Hopkinson commented.
Both of these women are viragoes or heroines (good "virile" women of great stature, strength, and courage, and of great public accomplishments), with narrative emphasis placed on their acts or their doing, that is, as Crenne portrays it, on their "exerceant oeuvres viriles" ("exercising manly tasks").
Of great importance to Crenne, I believe, and to our understanding of her portrayal of women as viragoes "exerceant oeuvres viriles" ("exercising manly tasks"), is precisely this story of creation, but not the one found in Genesis 2:21-22, whose misogynist interpretation Helisenne's husband, following the thinking of Du Pont and Matheolus, is so indebted to and obsessed with.