excretion

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ex·cre·tion

 (ĭk-skrē′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of discharging waste matter from the blood, tissues, or organs.
2. The matter, such as urine or sweat, that is so excreted.

ex•cre•tion

(ɪkˈskri ʃən)

n.
1. the act of excreting.
2. a substance excreted, as urine or sweat, or certain plant products.
[1595–1605]

ex·cre·tion

(ĭk-skrē′shən)
The elimination by an organism of waste products, such as carbon dioxide and urea, resulting from metabolic processes. Higher animals have specific organs of excretion, such as the lungs and kidneys. In plants and many lower organisms, waste is eliminated by diffusion to the outside environment.

excrete verb

excretion

the natural process of eliminating bodily wastes in the feces and urine.
See also: Bodily Functions

excretion

1. The removal of the waste products of cell metabolism.
2. The removal of feces, urine, and other wastes from the body via the colon, kidneys, lungs, or skin.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.excretion - the bodily process of discharging waste matterexcretion - the bodily process of discharging waste matter
defecation, laxation, shitting - the elimination of fecal waste through the anus
expelling, discharge, emission - any of several bodily processes by which substances go out of the body; "the discharge of pus"
incontinence, incontinency - involuntary urination or defecation
micturition, urination - the discharge of urine
2.excretion - waste matter (as urine or sweat but especially feces) discharged from the bodyexcretion - waste matter (as urine or sweat but especially feces) discharged from the body
faecal matter, faeces, fecal matter, feces, ordure, BM, dejection, stool - solid excretory product evacuated from the bowels
fecula - excreta (especially of insects)
wormcast - cylindrical mass of earth voided by a burrowing earthworm or lugworm
human waste - the body wastes of human beings
pee, piddle, piss, urine, weewee, water - liquid excretory product; "there was blood in his urine"; "the child had to make water"
barf, vomit, vomitus, puke - the matter ejected in vomiting
waste, waste material, waste matter, waste product - any materials unused and rejected as worthless or unwanted; "they collect the waste once a week"; "much of the waste material is carried off in the sewers"
guano - the excrement of sea birds; used as fertilizer

excretion

noun
The act or process of discharging bodily wastes or foreign substances:
Medicine: catharsis.
Translations
إخْراج، إبْراز غائِط
sekretionudskillelse
kiválasztódás
úrgangsefni
boşaltmaçıkarma

excretion

[eksˈkriːʃən] N (= act) → excreción f; (= substance) → excremento m

excretion

[ɪkˈskriːʃən] n [faeces, urine, sweat] → excrétion f; [drug] → excrétion f

excretion

n (= act)Ausscheidung f, → Exkretion f; (= substance)Exkret nt

excretion

[ɪksˈkriːʃn] n (frm) → escrezione f

excrete

(ikˈskriːt) verb
to discharge (waste matter) from the body.
exˈcretion (-ʃən) noun

ex·cre·tion

n. excreción, expulsión de lo secretado.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hepatitis E virus excretion can be prolonged in patients with hematological malignancies.
The 'Two Punch' (against more than one gene) Replikins TransFlu™ vaccine has been proven effective against H5N1 in chickens and totally blocked virus excretion, making control of virus reservoirs possible (4).
Infections with HSV-2 are sexually transmitted and cause lesions in the genital tract, infectivity is highest in primary infections and virus excretion can persist for many weeks and sheds without symptoms (Koelle and Wald, 2000).
The European Medicines Agency has approved the first two avian influenza vaccines for birds that the agency says will reduce mortality and virus excretion in poultry exposed to the disease.
19) The incubation period has been reported to be as little as 2 weeks, with continued virus excretion in stool for up to 2 weeks after the onset of illness.
Experimental infections with Nipah virus in pigs, cats, and pteropid bats: clinical features, virus excretion and subclinical infection.