viscera


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Related to viscera: abdominal viscera, pelvic viscera

vis·cer·a

 (vĭs′ər-ə)
pl.n.
1. The soft internal organs of the body, especially those contained within the abdominal and thoracic cavities.
2. The intestines.

[Latin vīscera, pl. of vīscus.]

viscera

(ˈvɪsərə)
pl n, sing viscus (ˈvɪskəs)
1. (Anatomy) anatomy the large internal organs of the body collectively, esp those in the abdominal cavity.
2. (Anatomy) (less formally) the intestines; guts
[C17: from Latin: entrails, pl of viscus internal organ]

vis•cer•a

(ˈvɪs ər ə)

n.pl., sing. vis•cus (ˈvɪs kəs)
1. the organs in the cavities of the body, esp. those in the abdominal cavity.
2. (not in technical use) the intestines.
[1645–55; < Latin, pl. of viscus flesh]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.viscera - internal organs collectively (especially those in the abdominal cavity)viscera - internal organs collectively (especially those in the abdominal cavity); "`viscera' is the plural form of `viscus'"
internal organ, viscus - a main organ that is situated inside the body

viscera

plural noun
Related words
adjective splanchic, visceral
Translations
sisälmykset
drobutroba

viscera

[ˈvɪsərə] NPLvísceras fpl

viscera

[ˈvɪsərə] nplviscères mpl

viscera

plinnere Organe pl; (in abdomen) → Eingeweide pl

vis·cer·a

n., pl. vísceras, órganos internos del cuerpo, esp. del abdomen.
References in classic literature ?
Sherrington, by experiments on dogs, showed that many of the usual marks of emotion were present in their behaviour even when, by severing the spinal cord in the lower cervical region, the viscera were cut off from all communication with the brain, except that existing through certain cranial nerves.
Cannon's chief argument against James is, if I understand him rightly, that similar affections of the viscera may accompany dissimilar emotions, especially fear and rage.
According to our definitions, if James is right, an emotion may be regarded as involving a confused perception of the viscera concerned in its causation, while if Cannon and Sherrington are right, an emotion involves a confused perception of its external stimulus.
He meant to be a unit who would make a certain amount of difference towards that spreading change which would one day tell appreciably upon the averages, and in the mean time have the pleasure of making an advantageous difference to the viscera of his own patients.
And, unlike the mere bush dogs, who stole shelter from the rain under overhanging eaves, Jerry was given a dry place under the roof where the heads of bushmen and of forgotten sandalwood traders hung down from above in the midst of a dusty confusion of dried viscera of sharks, crocodile skulls, and skeletons of Solomons rats that measured two-thirds of a yard in length from bone-tip of nose to bone-tip of tail.
In snakes, according to Schlegel, the shape of the body and the manner of swallowing determine the position of several of the most important viscera.
Reverend as you write yourself, be revengeful for once, and pray with me that he may be visited with such a fit of the stone, as if he had all the fragments of poor Robin in that region of his viscera where the disease holds its seat.
At the water's edge the ape-man stooped and with hunting knife and quick strong fingers deftly removed the dead kid's viscera.
Immediately the town of Alencon, speedily informed from the farther end of the rue de Saint-Blaise to the gate of Seez of this precipitate return, accompanied by singular circumstances, was perturbed throughout its viscera, both public and domestic.
However, when viscera are involved, the prognosis is much worse.
A 90-days experiment was conducted to study the effect of replacement of fishmeal (FM) with marine fish viscera (MFV) meal on growth performance, body composition and production of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings (mean weight 11.