viscount


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vis·count

 (vī′kount′)
n.
1. A nobleman ranking below an earl or count and above a baron.
2. Used as a title for such a nobleman.

[Middle English, from Old French visconte, from Medieval Latin vicecomes, vicecomit- : Late Latin vice-, vice- + Late Latin comes, occupant of any state office; see count2.]

viscount

(ˈvaɪkaʊnt)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in the British Isles) a nobleman ranking below an earl and above a baron
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in various countries) a son or younger brother of a count. See also vicomte
3. (Historical Terms) (in medieval Europe) the deputy of a count
[C14: from Old French visconte, from Medieval Latin vicecomes, from Late Latin vice- vice3 + comes count2]

vis•count

(ˈvaɪˌkaʊnt)

n.
a nobleman next below an earl or count and next above a baron.
[1350–1400; Middle English viscounte < Anglo-French; Old French visconte (French vicomte) =vis vice3 + counte count2]
vis′count•cy, n., pl. -cies.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.viscount - (in various countries) a son or younger brother or a countviscount - (in various countries) a son or younger brother or a count
noble, nobleman, Lord - a titled peer of the realm
2.viscount - a British peer who ranks below an earl and above a baronviscount - a British peer who ranks below an earl and above a baron
peer - a nobleman (duke or marquis or earl or viscount or baron) who is a member of the British peerage
Translations
فيكونت: لقَب شَرَف
vikomt
engelsk adelstitel
vicomte
greifi
vikontasvikontėvikonto žmona
vikonts
vikomt
vikont

viscount

[ˈvaɪkaʊnt] Nvizconde m

viscount

[ˈvaɪkaʊnt] nvicomte m

viscount

nViscount m

viscount

[ˈvaɪkaʊnt] nvisconte m

viscount

(ˈvaikaunt) noun
a nobleman next in rank below an earl.
ˈviscountess noun
1. the wife or widow of a viscount.
2. a woman of the same rank as a viscount.
References in classic literature ?
The viscount, therefore, remained in the room watching Christine as she slowly returned to life, while even the joint managers, Debienne and Poligny, who had come to offer their sympathy and congratulations, found themselves thrust into the passage among the crowd of dandies.
The old maid had never before met any man as seductive as this Olympean viscount.
Albert, besides being an elegant, well-looking young man, was also possessed of considerable talent and ability; moreover, he was a viscount -- a recently created one, certainly, but in the present day it is not necessary to go as far back as Noah in tracing a descent, and a genealogical tree is equally estimated, whether dated from 1399 or merely 1815; but to crown all these advantages, Albert de Morcerf commanded an income of 50,000 livres, a more than sufficient sum to render him a personage of considerable importance in Paris.
Athos, foreseeing the period when he should make a soldier of the viscount, had inured him to all kinds of arduous undertakings.
Dear viscount," said the duke, pressing within his own the vigorous and valiant hand of his companion, "allow me, on the contrary, to remember it, and to look after your safety; that man is dangerous, -- he will kill you.
VISCOUNT GORING, his Son SIR ROBERT CHILTERN, Bart.
Sir Walter had once been in company with the late viscount, but had never seen any of the rest of the family; and the difficulties of the case arose from there having been a suspension of all intercourse by letters of ceremony, ever since the death of that said late viscount, when, in consequence of a dangerous illness of Sir Walter's at the same time, there had been an unlucky omission at Kellynch.
The influence of the viscount and viscountess in their brother's behalf was assisted by that right understanding of Mr.
A few years later at the age of sixty he went still one step higher and became Viscount St.
Retribution overtook him in 1621, within a few days after his elevation to the dignity of Viscount St.
It takes two noble Earls and a Viscount, combined, to inform Nicodemus Boffin, Esquire, in an equally flattering manner, that an estimable lady in the West of England has offered to present a purse containing twenty pounds, to the Society for Granting Annuities to Unassuming Members of the Middle Classes, if twenty individuals will previously present purses of one hundred pounds each.
Opinion was divided whether she was the daughter of a prince, a duke, an earl, a viscount, or a baron, but all agreed upon the main fact, and that the single gentleman was her father; and all bent forward to catch a glimpse, though it were only of the tip of his noble nose, as he rode away, desponding, in his four-horse chaise.