vista


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vis·ta

 (vĭs′tə)
n.
1.
a. A distant view or prospect, especially one seen through an opening, as between rows of buildings or trees.
b. An avenue or other passage affording such a view.
2. An awareness of a range of time, events, or subjects; a broad mental view: "the deep and sweeping vistas these pioneering critics opened up" (Arthur C. Danto).

[Italian, from feminine past participle of vedere, to see, from Latin vidēre; see weid- in Indo-European roots.]

vis′taed (-təd) adj.

vista

(ˈvɪstə)
n
1. a view, esp through a long narrow avenue of trees, buildings, etc, or such a passage or avenue itself; prospect: a vista of arches.
2. a comprehensive mental view of a distant time or a lengthy series of events: the vista of the future.
[C17: from Italian: a view, from vedere to see, from Latin vidēre]
ˈvistaed adj
ˈvistaless adj

VISTA

(ˈvɪstə)
(in the US) n acronym for
(Social Welfare) Volunteers in Service to America; an organization of volunteers established by the Federal government to assist the poor

vis•ta

(ˈvɪs tə)

n., pl. -tas.
1. a view or prospect, esp. one seen through a long, narrow passage, as between rows of trees or houses.
2. a far-reaching mental view.
[1650–60; < Italian: a view < Latin vidēre]
vis′taed, adj.
vis′ta•less, adj.
syn: See view.

Vis•ta

(ˈvɪs tə)

n.
a town in SW California. 57,220.

VISTA

(ˈvɪs tə)

n.
Volunteers in Service to America.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vista - the visual percept of a regionvista - the visual percept of a region; "the most desirable feature of the park are the beautiful views"
visual percept, visual image - a percept that arises from the eyes; an image in the visual system
background, ground - the part of a scene (or picture) that lies behind objects in the foreground; "he posed her against a background of rolling hills"
coast - the area within view; "the coast is clear"
exposure - aspect resulting from the direction a building or window faces; "the studio had a northern exposure"
foreground - the part of a scene that is near the viewer
glimpse - a brief or incomplete view; "from the window he could catch a glimpse of the lake"
middle distance - the part of a scene between the foreground and the background
side view - a view from the side of something
tableau - any dramatic scene

vista

noun view, scene, prospect, landscape, panorama, perspective an endless vista of snow peaks and shadowed valleys

vista

noun
That which is or can be seen:
Translations
näköala

vista

[ˈvɪstə] N (lit) → vista f, panorama m (fig) → perspectiva f, horizonte m
to open up new vistasabrir nuevas perspectivas or nuevos horizontes

vista

[ˈvɪstə] n (= panorama) → vue f

vista

n
(= view)Aussicht f, → Blick m
(of past)Bild nt; (of future)Aussicht (→ of auf +acc), → Perspektive (of von) f

vista

[ˈvɪstə] n (view) → vista (fig) → prospettiva
References in classic literature ?
Here, in Sierra Vista, which was the name of Judge Scott's place, White Fang quickly began to make himself at home.
Whether it were a group of shrubs or an alleyway or a vista of water that we were passing, you would halt before me, and stand gazing at my face as though you were showing me possessions of your own.
Pearl accordingly ran to the bow-window, at the further end of the hall, and looked along the vista of a garden walk, carpeted with closely-shaven grass, and bordered with some rude and immature attempt at shrubbery.
Then, tumbled out of the cars without ceremony, they were no better off than before; they stood staring down the vista of Dearborn Street, with its big black buildings towering in the distance, unable to realize that they had arrived, and why, when they said "Chicago," people no longer pointed in some direction, but instead looked perplexed, or laughed, or went on without paying any attention.
At eight o'clock the Al Vista band played "Home, Sweet Home," and, following the hurried rush through the twilight to the picnic train, the four managed to get double seats facing each other.
As I did so I saw stretching far below me the beautiful vista of rocky gorge, and level, cacti-studded flat, wrought by the moonlight into a miracle of soft splendor and wondrous enchantment.
I believed blindly at such times that by some miracle, by some external circumstance, all this would suddenly open out, expand; that suddenly a vista of suitable activity--beneficent, good, and, above all, ready made (what sort of activity I had no idea, but the great thing was that it should be all ready for me)--would rise up before me--and I should come out into the light of day, almost riding a white horse and crowned with laurel.
Hutchinson's thoughts as he looked back upon the long vista of events with which this chair was so remarkably connected.
And the royal master of high latitudes sighs mightily, with the sinking sun upon his breast and the double-edged sword upon his knees, as if wearied by the innumerable centuries of a strenuous rule and saddened by the unchangeable aspect of the ocean under his feet - by the endless vista of future ages where the work of sowing the wind and reaping the whirlwind shall go on and on till his realm of living waters becomes a frozen and motionless ocean.
About midway in the short vista which my dreamy vision took in, one small circular island, profusely verdured, reposed upon the bosom of the stream.
Near the close of exceedingly warm day, I was sitting, book in hand, at an open window, commanding, through a long vista of the river banks, a view of a distant hill, the face of which nearest my position had been denuded by what is termed a land-slide, of the principal portion of its trees.
through a door that was always open, and a looped- back yellow damask portiere) the unexpected vista of a bedroom with a huge low bed upholstered like a sofa, and a toilet-table with frivolous lace flounces and a gilt-framed mirror.