vitality


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vi·tal·i·ty

 (vī-tăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. vi·tal·i·ties
1.
a. The capacity to live, grow, or develop: plants that lost their vitality when badly pruned.
b. The characteristic, principle, or force that distinguishes living things from nonliving things.
2. Physical or intellectual vigor; energy or liveliness. See Synonyms at vigor.
3. The capacity to endure: the vitality of an old tradition.

vitality

(vaɪˈtælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. physical or mental vigour, energy, etc
2. the power or ability to continue in existence, live, or grow: the vitality of a movement.
3. (Biology) a less common name for vital force

vi•tal•i•ty

(vaɪˈtæl ɪ ti)

n.
1. exuberant physical or mental vigor: a person of great vitality.
2. capacity for survival or for the continuation of a meaningful or purposeful existence: the vitality of an institution.
3. power to live or grow.
4. vital force or principle.
[1585–95; < Latin]

Vitality

 

full of beans Lively, energetic; full of vim, vigor, and vitality. Popular since the mid-1800s, this expression was originally stable slang. It was used in reference to spirited, bean-fed horses.

live wire A spry, energetic person. This expression, derived from the jumping and sparking of a fallen power line, enjoys common usage in the United States.

He was, if anyone was, the live wire of the Senior Common Room. (J. C. Masterman, To Teach Senators Wisdom, 1952)

rough-and-ready Exhibiting vigor and vitality which, though unrefined and perhaps indelicate, is appropriate for dealing with a given situation; crudely efficient; rough in manner, but prompt and effective in action. Though it has been suggested that this phrase may allude to Colonel Rough, a soldier under the Duke of Wellington at Waterloo, supporting evidence for this allegation is sketchy at best. It is more likely that rough-and-ready arose as a description of one’s manner or style, its implications being obvious.

The rough-and-ready style which belongs to a people of sailors, foresters, farmers and mechanics. (Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Conduct of Life, 1860)

“Old Rough and Ready” was a nickname given to General Zachary Taylor (1784-1850) for his conduct during the Seminole and the Mexican Wars in the early 1800s. Supporters of Taylor’s campaign and presidency (1849-50) were known as the “Rough and Ready Boys.”

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vitality - an energetic stylevitality - an energetic style      
vim, muscularity, vigor, vigour, energy - an imaginative lively style (especially style of writing); "his writing conveys great energy"; "a remarkable muscularity of style"
sparkle, twinkle, spark, light - merriment expressed by a brightness or gleam or animation of countenance; "he had a sparkle in his eye"; "there's a perpetual twinkle in his eyes"
2.vitality - a healthy capacity for vigorous activityvitality - a healthy capacity for vigorous activity; "jogging works off my excess energy"; "he seemed full of vim and vigor"
good health, healthiness - the state of being vigorous and free from bodily or mental disease
juice - energetic vitality; "her creative juices were flowing"
chi, ch'i, ki, qi - the circulating life energy that in Chinese philosophy is thought to be inherent in all things; in traditional Chinese medicine the balance of negative and positive forms in the body is believed to be essential for good health
3.vitality - (biology) a hypothetical force (not physical or chemical) once thought by Henri Bergson to cause the evolution and development of organisms
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
force - (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration"
4.vitality - the property of being able to survive and growvitality - the property of being able to survive and grow; "the vitality of a seed"
animateness, liveness, aliveness - the property of being animated; having animal life as distinguished from plant life

vitality

noun energy, vivacity, sparkle, go (informal), life, strength, pep, stamina, animation, vigour, exuberance, welly (slang), brio, robustness, liveliness, vim (slang), lustiness, vivaciousness He fell in love with her for her vitality and sense of fun.
apathy, inertia, lethargy, sluggishness, listlessness, weakness

vitality

noun
1. The vital principle or animating force within living beings:
2. A quality of active mental and physical forcefulness:
Informal: snap.
Translations
نَشاط ، حَيَوِيَّه
životnost
vitalitet
lífsòróttur
vitalita
canlılık

vitality

[vaɪˈtælɪtɪ] Nvitalidad f

vitality

[vaɪˈtæləti] nvitalité f

vitality

n (= energy)Energie f, → Leben nt, → Vitalität f; (of prose, language)Lebendigkeit f, → Vitalität f; (of companies, new state)Dynamik f; (= durability)Beständigkeit f

vitality

[vaɪˈtælɪtɪ] nvitalità
his performance lacked vitality → la sua esecuzione mancava di brio

vital

(ˈvaitl) adjective
1. essential; of the greatest importance. Speed is vital to the success of our plan; It is vital that we arrive at the hospital soon.
2. lively and energetic. a vital person/personality.
ˌviˈtality (-ˈtӕ-) noun
liveliness and energy. a girl of tremendous vitality.

vi·tal·i·ty

n. vitalidad.
1. cualidad de vivir;
2. vigor mental o físico.

vitality

n vitalidad f
References in classic literature ?
But in republics there is more vitality, greater hatred, and more desire for vengeance, which will never permit them to allow the memory of their former liberty to rest; so that the safest way is to destroy them or to reside there.
Rarely did he strike blows himself, for Ponta had a quick eye and could defend as well as attack, while Joe had no chance against the other's enormous vitality.
It made toward death too quickly to suit my youth and vitality.
His pure tight skin was an excellent fit; and closely wrapped up in it, and embalmed with inner health and strength, like a revivified Egyptian, this Starbuck seemed prepared to endure for long ages to come, and to endure always, as now; for be it Polar snow or torrid sun, like a patent chronometer, his interior vitality was warranted to do well in all climates.
It does seem to me, that herein we see the rare virtue of a strong individual vitality, and the rare virtue of thick walls, and the rare virtue of interior spaciousness.
By entering into harmony with his environment, Ssu-K`ung T`u allowed his splendid vitality to find expression, and after the lapse of a thousand years these glowing pages torn from the book of life have drifted towards us like rose-leaves down a sombre stream.
Moreover, she would have been unattractive to men also from the lack of just what Kitty had too much of--of the suppressed fire of vitality, and the consciousness of her own attractiveness.
You seem to have a sort of genius for establishing relations with people--seempathy, I suppose, or animal magnetism, or youthful vitality, or something.
Those new diseases that annually attack the products of the soil, those defective crops, those insufficient resources, are all signs of a vitality that is rapidly wearing out and of an approaching exhaustion.
His tremendous vitality remained, and radiated from all his being, but it was vitality under the new aspect of the man-trampling man-conqueror.
Having gained her degree, she was doing no more studying; and he, having worked all vitality out of his mind and body, was doing no writing.
He was as thick as my leg, and looked as if millstones couldn't crush the disgusting vitality out of him.