vitality


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vi·tal·i·ty

 (vī-tăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. vi·tal·i·ties
1.
a. The capacity to live, grow, or develop: plants that lost their vitality when badly pruned.
b. The characteristic, principle, or force that distinguishes living things from nonliving things.
2. Physical or intellectual vigor; energy or liveliness. See Synonyms at vigor.
3. The capacity to endure: the vitality of an old tradition.

vitality

(vaɪˈtælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. physical or mental vigour, energy, etc
2. the power or ability to continue in existence, live, or grow: the vitality of a movement.
3. (Biology) a less common name for vital force

vi•tal•i•ty

(vaɪˈtæl ɪ ti)

n.
1. exuberant physical or mental vigor: a person of great vitality.
2. capacity for survival or for the continuation of a meaningful or purposeful existence: the vitality of an institution.
3. power to live or grow.
4. vital force or principle.
[1585–95; < Latin]

Vitality

 

full of beans Lively, energetic; full of vim, vigor, and vitality. Popular since the mid-1800s, this expression was originally stable slang. It was used in reference to spirited, bean-fed horses.

live wire A spry, energetic person. This expression, derived from the jumping and sparking of a fallen power line, enjoys common usage in the United States.

He was, if anyone was, the live wire of the Senior Common Room. (J. C. Masterman, To Teach Senators Wisdom, 1952)

rough-and-ready Exhibiting vigor and vitality which, though unrefined and perhaps indelicate, is appropriate for dealing with a given situation; crudely efficient; rough in manner, but prompt and effective in action. Though it has been suggested that this phrase may allude to Colonel Rough, a soldier under the Duke of Wellington at Waterloo, supporting evidence for this allegation is sketchy at best. It is more likely that rough-and-ready arose as a description of one’s manner or style, its implications being obvious.

The rough-and-ready style which belongs to a people of sailors, foresters, farmers and mechanics. (Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Conduct of Life, 1860)

“Old Rough and Ready” was a nickname given to General Zachary Taylor (1784-1850) for his conduct during the Seminole and the Mexican Wars in the early 1800s. Supporters of Taylor’s campaign and presidency (1849-50) were known as the “Rough and Ready Boys.”

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vitality - an energetic stylevitality - an energetic style      
vim, muscularity, vigor, vigour, energy - an imaginative lively style (especially style of writing); "his writing conveys great energy"; "a remarkable muscularity of style"
sparkle, twinkle, spark, light - merriment expressed by a brightness or gleam or animation of countenance; "he had a sparkle in his eye"; "there's a perpetual twinkle in his eyes"
2.vitality - a healthy capacity for vigorous activityvitality - a healthy capacity for vigorous activity; "jogging works off my excess energy"; "he seemed full of vim and vigor"
good health, healthiness - the state of being vigorous and free from bodily or mental disease
juice - energetic vitality; "her creative juices were flowing"
chi, ch'i, ki, qi - the circulating life energy that in Chinese philosophy is thought to be inherent in all things; in traditional Chinese medicine the balance of negative and positive forms in the body is believed to be essential for good health
3.vitality - (biology) a hypothetical force (not physical or chemical) once thought by Henri Bergson to cause the evolution and development of organisms
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
force - (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration"
4.vitality - the property of being able to survive and growvitality - the property of being able to survive and grow; "the vitality of a seed"
animateness, liveness, aliveness - the property of being animated; having animal life as distinguished from plant life

vitality

noun energy, vivacity, sparkle, go (informal), life, strength, pep, stamina, animation, vigour, exuberance, welly (slang), brio, robustness, liveliness, vim (slang), lustiness, vivaciousness He fell in love with her for her vitality and sense of fun.
apathy, inertia, lethargy, sluggishness, listlessness, weakness

vitality

noun
1. The vital principle or animating force within living beings:
2. A quality of active mental and physical forcefulness:
Informal: snap.
Translations
نَشاط ، حَيَوِيَّه
životnost
vitalitet
lífsòróttur
vitalita
canlılık

vitality

[vaɪˈtælɪtɪ] Nvitalidad f

vitality

[vaɪˈtæləti] nvitalité f

vitality

n (= energy)Energie f, → Leben nt, → Vitalität f; (of prose, language)Lebendigkeit f, → Vitalität f; (of companies, new state)Dynamik f; (= durability)Beständigkeit f

vitality

[vaɪˈtælɪtɪ] nvitalità
his performance lacked vitality → la sua esecuzione mancava di brio

vital

(ˈvaitl) adjective
1. essential; of the greatest importance. Speed is vital to the success of our plan; It is vital that we arrive at the hospital soon.
2. lively and energetic. a vital person/personality.
ˌviˈtality (-ˈtӕ-) noun
liveliness and energy. a girl of tremendous vitality.

vi·tal·i·ty

n. vitalidad.
1. cualidad de vivir;
2. vigor mental o físico.

vitality

n vitalidad f
References in classic literature ?
He was as thick as my leg, and looked as if millstones couldn't crush the disgusting vitality out of him.
All such professors of the several branches of jocularity would have been sternly repressed, not only by the rigid discipline of law, but by the general sentiment which give law its vitality.
His pure tight skin was an excellent fit; and closely wrapped up in it, and embalmed with inner health and strength, like a revivified Egyptian, this Starbuck seemed prepared to endure for long ages to come, and to endure always, as now; for be it Polar snow or torrid sun, like a patent chronometer, his interior vitality was warranted to do well in all climates.
It does seem to me, that herein we see the rare virtue of a strong individual vitality, and the rare virtue of thick walls, and the rare virtue of interior spaciousness.
It has not the vitality and force of a single living man; for a single man can bend it to his will.
We must remember that it is deficient, not excessive vitality, that makes the greatest trouble in this world," returned Mr.
The play-hour in the evening I thought the pleasantest fraction of the day at Lowood: the bit of bread, the draught of coffee swallowed at five o'clock had revived vitality, if it had not satisfied hunger: the long restraint of the day was slackened; the schoolroom felt warmer than in the morning--its fires being allowed to burn a little more brightly, to supply, in some measure, the place of candles, not yet introduced: the ruddy gloaming, the licensed uproar, the confusion of many voices gave one a welcome sense of liberty.
The girl's exuberant vitality asserted itself all over her, from head to foot.
There are few of us who have not sometimes wakened before dawn, either after one of those dreamless nights that make us almost enamoured of death, or one of those nights of horror and misshapen joy, when through the chambers of the brain sweep phantoms more terrible than reality itself, and instinct with that vivid life that lurks in all grotesques, and that lends to Gothic art its enduring vitality, this art being, one might fancy, especially the art of those whose minds have been troubled with the malady of reverie.
We must organize companies with sufficient vitality to carry on a fight, as it is simply useless to get a company started that will succumb to the first bit of opposition it may encounter.
Then she recognized Robin for the first time, and a radiant smile came over her face, together with the rare blush of returned vitality, and her head sank upon his shoulder with a little tremble and sigh of relief.
Many books and musical instruments lay scattered about, but failed to give any vitality to the scene.