vitally


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vi·tal

 (vīt′l)
adj.
1.
a. Of, relating to, or characteristic of life: vital strength. See Synonyms at living.
b. Necessary to the continuation of life; life-sustaining: a vital organ; vital nutrients.
c. Used or done on a living cell or tissue: vital dyes; vital staining.
d. Concerned with or recording data pertinent to lives: vital records.
2. Full of life or energy; animated: "The population of the teeming, vital slum ... declined" (Rick Hampson).
3.
a. Necessary to continued existence or effectiveness: "Irrigation was vital to early civilization" (William H. McNeill).
b. Extremely important; essential: "A vital component of any democracy is a free labor movement" (Bayard Rustin).
4. Destructive to life; fatal: a vital injury.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin vītālis, from vīta, life; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.]

vi′tal·ly adv.
vi′tal·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.vitally - to a vital degreevitally - to a vital degree; "this is vitally important"
Translations

vitally

[ˈvaɪtəlɪ] ADV
1. (= extremely) [interested, concerned] → sumamente; [affect] → de forma vital
it is vitally important thates de vital or suma importancia que ... + subjun
it is vitally necessary thates indispensable que ... + subjun
vitally needed [food, tents, money] → indispensable
this statement vitally ignores a number of issuesestas manifestaciones ignoran de forma fundamental una serie de cuestiones
2. (= intensely) music which remains vitally fresh todaymúsica que sigue fresca y llena de vitalidad

vitally

[ˈvaɪtəli] adv
to be vitally important → être d'une importance vitalevital organs nplorganes mpl vitauxvital signs nplsignes mpl vitauxvital statistics npl
[population] → statistiques fpl démographiques
[woman] → mensurations fpl

vitally

adv
importantäußerst, ungeheuer; necessary, neededdringend; (emph: = greatly) interested, concernedäußerst
(= intensely) vitally alivequicklebendig; vitally alerthellwach; he writes freshly and vitallyer schreibt einen frischen und lebendigen or kraftvollen Stil

vitally

[ˈvaɪtəlɪ] adv vitally importantdi vitale importanza
vitally urgent → estremamente urgente
References in classic literature ?
You act as though you might be vitally interested in it.
I cast my vote, perchance, as I think right; but I am not vitally concerned that that right should prevail.
Every word I now speak bears on interests still in suspense, which vitally concern Mr.
She appeared to me to take great care of the Doctor, and to like him very much, though I never thought her vitally interested in the Dictionary: some cumbrous fragments of which work the Doctor always carried in his pockets, and in the lining of his hat, and generally seemed to be expounding to her as they walked about.
She had a serpentine way of coming close at me when she pretended to be vitally interested in the friends and localities I had left, which was altogether snaky and fork-tongued; and when she made an occasional bounce upon Startop(who said very little to her), or upon Drummle (who said less), I rather envied them for being on the opposite side of the table.
By the kindness of Lord Godalming, I am empowered to read her letters and papers, for I am deeply concerned about certain matters vitally important.
Tottering among them was the rival color bearer, whom the youth saw had been bitten vitally by the bullets of the last formidable volley.
You see, they are vitally important, and Mahbub Ali he did not know where you were.
Contenting myself with the certainty that Music, in its various modes of metre, rhythm, and rhyme, is of so vast a moment in Poetry as never to be wisely rejected -- is so vitally important an adjunct, that he is simply silly who declines its assistance, I will not now pause to maintain its absolute essentiality.
There are not many grown and matured men living while we speak, good men too, who if they were thrown into this same court as suitors would not be vitally changed and depreciated within three years--within two--within one.
By this time the American admiral, O'Connor, was fully informed of the existence of the airships, and he was no longer vitally concerned for Panama, since the submarine flotilla was reported arrived there from Key West, and the Delaware and Abraham Lincoln, two powerful and entirely modern ships, were already at Rio Grande, on the Pacific side of the canal.
He was too sick to be vitally interested, and, besides, he had a half feeling that it was all a dream; but he noted that the men were resting on their sweeps, while the woman and the steersman were intently watching the run of seas behind them.