vitamin K


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Related to vitamin K: vitamin E, vitamin D, Vitamin K Deficiency

vitamin K

n.
A fat-soluble vitamin, found in leafy green vegetables and some animal products and produced by intestinal bacteria, that plays an essential role in blood clotting. It exists in two main forms, K1 and K2.

[Abbreviation and partial translation of German K(oagulations)vitamin, coagulation vitamin, clotting vitamin, from Koagulation, coagulation, from Latin coāgulātiō, coāgulātiōn-, from coāgulāre, to curdle, coagulate; see coagulate.]

vitamin K1

n.
1. A yellow viscous oil, C31H46O2, found in leafy green vegetables and used by the body in the synthesis of prothrombin. Also called phylloquinone.
2. A synthetic analog of this vitamin, used in the treatment of some coagulation disorders and to prevent hemorrhagic disease in newborns. In veterinary medicine, it is used as an antidote to poisoning by anticoagulant rodenticides. Also called phytonadione.

vitamin K2

n.
Any of several fat-soluble compounds found in liver and other animal products and in some fermented foods and synthesized in the body by intestinal bacteria. Also called menaquinone.

vitamin K3

n.

vitamin K

n, pl K vitamins
(Elements & Compounds) any of the fat-soluble vitamins, including phylloquinone and the menaquinones, which are essential for the normal clotting of blood

vitamin K1


n.
a yellowish, oily, viscous liquid, C31H46O2, that occurs in leafy vegetables, rice, bran, and hog liver or is obtained esp. from alfalfa or putrefied sardine meat or synthesized and that promotes blood clotting by increasing the prothrombin content of the blood. Also called phylloquinone, phytonadione.
[1930–35]

vitamin K2


n.
a light yellow, crystalline solid, C41H56O2, having properties similar to those of vitamin K1.
[1935–40]

vitamin K3


n.
[1955–60]

vitamin K

Any of a group of vitamins important for normal clotting of the blood. Vitamin K is found in green leafy vegetables, pork, liver, and vegetable oils.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vitamin K - a fat-soluble vitamin that helps in the clotting of blood
fat-soluble vitamin - any vitamin that is soluble in fats
phylloquinone, phytonadione, vitamin K1 - a form of vitamin K
menadione, vitamin K3 - a form of vitamin K
References in periodicals archive ?
Ames published research indicating that optimum intake of vitamin K plays an important role in longevity.
A new 2014 study on vitamin K confirms that ample vitamin K intake can indeed help you live longer.
Vitamin K was last in total channel volume, but grew a hearty 23.
Vitamin K is also essential for blood clotting, wound healing and inhibiting blood vessel calcification.
Vitamin K isn't a single vitamin, but a group of fat-soluble compounds found primarily in dark-green, leafy vegetables.
As we get older, we tend to eat less foods high in vitamin K.
Researchers aren't certain how much vitamin K is enough, but in Framingham, those at highest risk got an average of 60 micrograms a day and those at lowest risk averaged 250 micrograms a day.
No one will know for sure if vitamin K can prevent fractures until scientists complete several trials that will test the vitamin against a placebo (see "Vitamin K on Trial," p.
She is in the Vitamin K Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston.
This observation prompts pediatricians to give newborns a healthy shot of vitamin K to lower the 1 percent risk of spontaneous bleeding they would otherwise face.
We fear the same knowledge deficit exists today regarding vitamin K.
The findings suggest a pronounced low vitamin K status of bone during growth, which means young children could benefit from additional vitamin K," said PL Thomas' Mr.