vituperate


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vi·tu·per·ate

 (vī-to͞o′pə-rāt′, -tyo͞o′-, vĭ-)
v. vi·tu·per·at·ed, vi·tu·per·at·ing, vi·tu·per·ates
v.tr.
To rebuke or criticize harshly or angrily; berate. See Synonyms at scold.
v.intr.
To use harshly critical or irate language; rail.

[Latin vituperāre, vituperāt-.]

vi·tu′per·a′tor n.

vituperate

(vɪˈtjuːpəˌreɪt)
vb
to berate or rail (against) abusively; revile
[C16: from Latin vituperāre to blame, from vitium a defect + parāre to make]
viˈtuperˌator n

vi•tu•per•ate

(vaɪˈtu pəˌreɪt, -ˈtyu-, vɪ-)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing. v.i.
1. to use harsh or abusive language.
v.t.
2. to censure harshly; revile.
[1535–45; < Latin vituperātus, past participle of vituperāre to spoil, blame =vitu-, variant of viti-, s. of vitium blemish, vice1 + -perāre, comb. form of parāre to furnish, provide (see prepare)]
vi•tu′per•a`tor, n.

vituperate


Past participle: vituperated
Gerund: vituperating

Imperative
vituperate
vituperate
Present
I vituperate
you vituperate
he/she/it vituperates
we vituperate
you vituperate
they vituperate
Preterite
I vituperated
you vituperated
he/she/it vituperated
we vituperated
you vituperated
they vituperated
Present Continuous
I am vituperating
you are vituperating
he/she/it is vituperating
we are vituperating
you are vituperating
they are vituperating
Present Perfect
I have vituperated
you have vituperated
he/she/it has vituperated
we have vituperated
you have vituperated
they have vituperated
Past Continuous
I was vituperating
you were vituperating
he/she/it was vituperating
we were vituperating
you were vituperating
they were vituperating
Past Perfect
I had vituperated
you had vituperated
he/she/it had vituperated
we had vituperated
you had vituperated
they had vituperated
Future
I will vituperate
you will vituperate
he/she/it will vituperate
we will vituperate
you will vituperate
they will vituperate
Future Perfect
I will have vituperated
you will have vituperated
he/she/it will have vituperated
we will have vituperated
you will have vituperated
they will have vituperated
Future Continuous
I will be vituperating
you will be vituperating
he/she/it will be vituperating
we will be vituperating
you will be vituperating
they will be vituperating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been vituperating
you have been vituperating
he/she/it has been vituperating
we have been vituperating
you have been vituperating
they have been vituperating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been vituperating
you will have been vituperating
he/she/it will have been vituperating
we will have been vituperating
you will have been vituperating
they will have been vituperating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been vituperating
you had been vituperating
he/she/it had been vituperating
we had been vituperating
you had been vituperating
they had been vituperating
Conditional
I would vituperate
you would vituperate
he/she/it would vituperate
we would vituperate
you would vituperate
they would vituperate
Past Conditional
I would have vituperated
you would have vituperated
he/she/it would have vituperated
we would have vituperated
you would have vituperated
they would have vituperated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.vituperate - spread negative information aboutvituperate - spread negative information about; "The Nazi propaganda vilified the Jews"
blackguard, clapperclaw, abuse, shout - use foul or abusive language towards; "The actress abused the policeman who gave her a parking ticket"; "The angry mother shouted at the teacher"

vituperate

verb
To attack with harsh, often insulting language:
Translations

vituperate

[vɪˈtjuːpəreɪt] (frm)
A. VTvituperar, llenar de injurias
B. VI to vituperate against sth/sbvituperar algo/a algn

vituperate

vischmähen (geh) (→ against +acc), → verunglimpfen (→ against +acc)
References in classic literature ?
It is not my design, therefore, to vituperate my deceased friend, Toby Dammit.
Crime fighting has mutated everywhere into a grotesque theater of civic morality that elected officials use to stage their masculine fortitude and vituperate the "undeserving" poor so as to shore up the deficit of legitimacy they suffer when they abandon the protective mission of the state on the social and economic front.
Yet, rather than presenting it as another manifestation of the persecution of the Jews, Heine chooses to describe it as a debate between equal parties, each trying to vituperate the other in a way that exposes both as narrow-minded zealots, even if the monk excels in vituperation while the rabbi tends to stress the theological doctrine and biblical sources.