vivisection

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viv·i·sec·tion

 (vĭv′ĭ-sĕk′shən, vĭv′ĭ-sĕk′-)
n.
The act or practice of cutting into or otherwise injuring living animals for the purpose of scientific research.

[Latin vīvus, alive; see vivify + (dis)section.]

viv′i·sec′tion·al adj.
viv′i·sec′tion·al·ly adv.
viv′i·sec′tion·ist n.

vivisection

(ˌvɪvɪˈsɛkʃən)
n
(Zoology) the act or practice of performing experiments on living animals, involving cutting into or dissecting the body
[C18: from vivi-, from Latin vīvus living + section, as in dissection]
ˌviviˈsectional adj
ˌviviˈsectionally adv

viv•i•sec•tion

(ˌvɪv əˈsɛk ʃən)

n.
1. the action of cutting into or dissecting a living body.
2. the practice of subjecting living animals to cutting operations, esp. in order to advance physiological and pathological knowledge.
[1700–10]
viv`i•sec′tion•al, adj.

viv·i·sec·tion

(vĭv′ĭ-sĕk′shən)
The practice of examining internal organs and tissues by cutting into or dissecting a living animal.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vivisection - the act of operating on living animals (especially in scientific research)
surgical operation, surgical procedure, surgical process, surgery, operation - a medical procedure involving an incision with instruments; performed to repair damage or arrest disease in a living body; "they will schedule the operation as soon as an operating room is available"; "he died while undergoing surgery"
Translations
تَشْريح حَيوانات حَيَّه
vivisekce
vivisektion
élveboncolás
vivisekcija
vivisekcija
açımlama

vivisection

[ˌvɪvɪˈsekʃən] Nvivisección f

vivisection

[ˌvɪvɪˈsɛkʃən] nvivisection f

vivisection

nVivisektion f

vivisection

[ˌvɪvɪˈsɛkʃn] nvivisezione f

vivisection

(ˌviviˈʃekʃn) noun
the practice of cutting open live animals for scientific research.

viv·i·sec·tion

n. vivisección, corte o sección realizada en animales con fines investigativos.
References in classic literature ?
Or else he probes them with the cruel hand of a vivisectionist, groping about in their mental processes and examining their souls as though to see of what soul-stuff is made.
Descartes himself practiced it as a physiologist, and many vivisectionists of the time declared themselves his followers" (42).
Lewis achieves the same effect when the vivisectionists in his 1945 novel That Hideous Strength capture the beloved bear Mr.
disparages vivisectionists as mystics who 'in their blood-stained
The animal rights advocates go to battle against the vivisectionists, but their false theory only fosters the cruelty of the latter.
Ken Sharp's incredible photo of ND in action in a cramped Brixton pub froze the convulsive energy of this intense outfit, whose lyrics--laid bare in the handwritten notebooks of founder Nic Bullen--howled down the mass injustices perpetrated by warmongers, corrupt politicians, financial institutions, vivisectionists, etc.
If, as Mason argues, the Victorian practice of pet keeping became a semiotic for a "commitment to the affective priorities," as well as a reliable indicator of an individual's ability to care for others (14, 13), then the cruelty to animals attributed to the vivisectionists made a clear case for the contrary.
MPs and bankers may have reached new heights in their attempts to make their profession the least popular in the country, but every survey puts journalists way down the list too, looking up enviously at more respected souls like estate agents, traffic wardens and vivisectionists.
This amazing refuge rescues apes from circuses, unscrupulous photographers and vivisectionists who, if there is any justice, will spend eternity blinking cleaning fluids out of their eyes.
Many contemporary antivivisectionists compared the fate of the suffering animal to the suffering of women under the hands of surgeons whose practices seemed not so far removed from those of vivisectionists.
This analysis also revises a contemporary perspective on animal experimentation based primarily on the work of Singer, which draws on the utilitarians, the nineteenth-century vivisectionists, and especially Jeremy Bentham, who maintained that the principal question was not whether animals can think or speak, but whether they can suffer.
It is compromise," Senator Kennedy wrote, "that prevents each set of reformers--the wets and the drys, the one-worlders and the isolationists, the vivisectionists and the antivivisectionists--from crushing the group on the extreme opposite end of the political spectrum" (p.