vocabulary

(redirected from vocabularies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to vocabularies: Controlled vocabularies

vo·cab·u·lar·y

 (vō-kăb′yə-lĕr′ē)
n. pl. vo·cab·u·lar·ies
1. All the words of a language.
2. The sum of words used by, understood by, or at the command of a particular person or group.
3. A list of words and often phrases, usually arranged alphabetically and defined or translated; a lexicon or glossary.
4. A supply of expressive means; a repertoire of communication: a dancer's vocabulary of movement.

[French vocabulaire, from Old French, from Medieval Latin vocābulārium, from neuter of vocābulārius, of words, from Latin vocābulum, name; see vocable.]

vocabulary

(vəˈkæbjʊlərɪ)
n, pl -laries
1. (Linguistics) a listing, either selective or exhaustive, containing the words and phrases of a language, with meanings or translations into another language; glossary
2. (Linguistics) the aggregate of words in the use or comprehension of a specified person, class, profession, etc
3. (Linguistics) all the words contained in a language
4. a range or system of symbols, qualities, or techniques constituting a means of communication or expression, as any of the arts or crafts: a wide vocabulary of textures and colours.
[C16: from Medieval Latin vocābulārium, from vocābulārius concerning words, from Latin vocābulum vocable]

vo•cab•u•lar•y

(voʊˈkæb yəˌlɛr i)

n., pl. -lar•ies.
1. the stock of words used by or known to a particular person or group.
2. a list or collection of words and often phrases, usu. arranged in alphabetical order and defined.
3. the words of a language.
4. any collection of signs or symbols constituting a means or system of nonverbal communication.
5. the set of forms, techniques, or other means of expression available to or characteristic of an artist, art form, etc.
[1525–35; < Medieval Latin vocābulārium, n. use of neuter of vocābulārius of words = Latin vocābul(um) vocable + -ārius -ary]
vo•cab′u•lar`ied, adj.

Vocabulary

 a collection or list of words, 1532.
Examples: vocabulary of arms, 1862; of new denominations, 1821; of dishes, 1825; a vocabulary to the understanding, 1662.

vocabulary

All of the words and phrases used in a language or by a person, or a listing of some of these.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vocabulary - a listing of the words used in some enterprisevocabulary - a listing of the words used in some enterprise
wordbook - a reference book containing words (usually with their meanings)
2.vocabulary - a language user's knowledge of wordsvocabulary - a language user's knowledge of words
cognition, knowledge, noesis - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
language, speech - the mental faculty or power of vocal communication; "language sets homo sapiens apart from all other animals"
3.vocabulary - the system of techniques or symbols serving as a means of expression (as in arts or crafts); "he introduced a wide vocabulary of techniques"
artistic creation, artistic production, art - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
frame of reference, frame - a system of assumptions and standards that sanction behavior and give it meaning

vocabulary

noun
1. language, words, lexicon, word stock, word hoard Children need to read to improve their vocabularies.
2. wordbook, dictionary, glossary, lexicon I could not find this word in my small Italian-English vocabulary.

vocabulary

noun
1. All the words of a language:
2. An alphabetical list of words often defined or translated:
3. Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
Translations
كَلِماتمَجْموع كَلِمات اللغَهمُعْجَممفرداتمُفْرَدات
slovní zásobaslovníčekslovníkslova
ordforrådordlisteterminologiord
sanavarastosanasto
rječnik
szójegyzékszókincs
orîorîaforîiorîasafn
語彙語彙集用語
어휘
vārdnīcavārdu krājums
slovná zásoba
besedni zakladbesednjak
ordförråd
คำศัพท์
kelime dağarcığıkelimelersözcük dağarcığısözlükçe
từ vựng

vocabulary

[vəʊˈkæbjʊlərɪ] N
1. [of person, language, subject] → vocabulario m, léxico m
a new word in the German vocabularyuna palabra nueva en el vocabulario or léxico alemán
2. (= glossary) → glosario m

vocabulary

[vəʊˈkæbjʊləri] n
[person] → vocabulaire m
[language] → vocabulaire m

vocabulary

nWortschatz m, → Vokabular nt (geh); (in textbook) → Wörterverzeichnis f; he has a limited vocabularyer hat einen beschränkten Wortschatz; the vocabulary of the legal professiondas Vokabular der Juristen; vocabulary bookVokabelheft nt; (printed) → Vokabelbuch nt; vocabulary test (Sch) → Vokabelarbeit f

vocabulary

[vəʊˈkæbjʊlərɪ] n (gen) → vocabolario; (in textbook) → vocabolario, dizionario
we have to learn all the new vocabulary → dobbiamo imparare tutti i vocaboli nuovi

vocabulary

(vəˈkӕbjuləri) plural voˈcabularies noun
1. words in general. This book contains some difficult vocabulary.
2. (the stock of) words known and used eg by one person, or within a particular trade or profession. He has a vocabulary of about 20,000 words; the specialized vocabulary of nuclear physics.
3. a list of words in alphabetical order with meanings eg added as a supplement to a book dealing with a particular subject. This edition of Shakespeare's plays has a good vocabulary at the back.

vocabulary

مُفْرَدات slovní zásoba ordforråd Vokabular λεξιλόγιο vocabulario sanavarasto vocabulaire rječnik vocabolario 語彙 어휘 vocabulaire ordforråd słownictwo vocabulário словарь ordförråd คำศัพท์ sözcük dağarcığı từ vựng 词汇

vocabulary

n. vocabulario.
References in classic literature ?
But in Jerry's vocabulary, "Mister Haggin" possessed all the definiteness of sound and meaning that the word "master" possesses in the vocabularies of humans in relation to their dogs.
The main tasks in writing a business vocabulary are as follows: to unify business vocabularies of various organization departments; identify synonyms; synchronize the verbosity used in the business activities.
It was further revealed that for those with stronger passage sight vocabularies, the role of passage sight vocabulary in the perception of ease in lexical inferencing depended on the degree of familiarity with the topic.
In addition, incidental vocabulary learning research manifested itself in the investigation of the role of modified input and output in the incidental process of word meaning (Ellis & He, 1999), measuring the frequency of exposure to new vocabularies and its influence on incidental vocabulary learning (Rott, 1999), incidental vocabulary learning through listening comparing to reading (Vidal, 2011), L2 vocabulary acquisition through negotiated interaction (Luan & Sappathy, 2011) and last but not least, the relationship between dictionary use and glossing and incidental vocabulary learning (Hulstijn, Hollander, & Greidanus, 1996; Roby, 1999; Yoshii, 2006; Lin & Huang, 2008).
Researchers working to increase the vocabularies of young children have utilized trade books read aloud to students to introduce, define and discuss target words (Beck & McKeown, & Kucan, 2005; Brett, Rothlein, & Hurley, 1996; Coyne, Simmons, Kame'enui, & Stoolmiller, 2004; Penno, Wilkinson, & Moore, 2002).
Thus, students with smaller vocabularies are at a greater disadvantage in learning, and this lack of knowledge too often is the main barrier to their comprehension of texts and lectures (Newton, Padak, & Rasinski, 2008).
The facility of such approach lead to make some of psycho-background in the mentality of the learners to feel the vocabulary learning procedure as an easy procedure; and learn new vocabularies easier and better, and have longer retention.
Therefore, it is necessary to adopt effective remedial measures to extend students' vocabularies.
Following the assumption mentioned earlier that students may learn three-hundred word families in a given semester and the most frequent five thousand words in Davis (2006), the end-vocabulary, the end-of-chapter vocabularies, and the reading vocabulary (i.
Learners with vocabularies below that size will have great problems in understanding written texts, since reading comprehension will be hampered by lack of word knowledge.
Walsh and Blewitt speculated that the Matthew Effect may be partially a function of the fact that children with larger vocabularies begin a study with greater knowledge of words that are thought to be novel, whereas initial knowledge of novel vocabulary words was tightly controlled in Walsh and Blewitt's study.
Composition of vocabulary appeared more influential on children's expressive rather than receptive vocabularies, with less growth by groups to recall rare words than root or basic words.