vocation


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vo·ca·tion

 (vō-kā′shən)
n.
1. A regular occupation, especially one for which a person is particularly suited or qualified.
2.
a. An inclination or aptness for a certain kind of work: a vocation for medicine.
b. Theology A calling of an individual by God, especially for a religious career.

[Middle English vocacioun, divine call to a religious life, from Old French vocation, from Latin vocātiō, vocātiōn-, a calling, from vocātus, past participle of vocāre, to call; see wekw- in Indo-European roots.]

vocation

(vəʊˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. a specified occupation, profession, or trade
2.
a. a special urge, inclination, or predisposition to a particular calling or career, esp a religious one
b. such a calling or career
[C15: from Latin vocātiō a calling, from vocāre to call]

vo•ca•tion

(voʊˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a particular occupation, business, or profession; calling.
2. a strong inclination to follow a particular activity or career.
3. a divine call to a religious life.
4. a function or station, esp. a religious life, to which one is called by God.
[1400–50; < Latin vocātiō a call, summons =vocā(re) to call + -tiō -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vocation - the particular occupation for which you are trainedvocation - the particular occupation for which you are trained
job, line of work, occupation, business, line - the principal activity in your life that you do to earn money; "he's not in my line of business"
specialism, specialization, specialty, speciality, specialisation - the special line of work you have adopted as your career; "his specialization is gastroenterology"
lifework - the principal work of your career
walk of life, walk - careers in general; "it happens in all walks of life"
business life, professional life - a career in industrial or commercial or professional activities
2.vocation - a body of people doing the same kind of work
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
profession - the body of people in a learned occupation; "the news spread rapidly through the medical profession"; "they formed a community of scientists"
press corps - a group of journalists representing different publications who all cover the same topics; "the White House press corps"

vocation

noun profession, calling, job, business, office, trade, role, post, career, mission, employment, pursuit, life work, métier the levels of knowledge and skill required for success in many vocations
Quotations
"Many are called, but few are chosen" Bible: St. Matthew

vocation

noun
1. Activity pursued as a livelihood:
Slang: racket.
Archaic: employ.
2. An inner urge to pursue an activity or perform a service:
Translations
دَعْوَة إلى الكَهْنوت، نِداءوَظيفَه، مِهْنَه
poslánípovolání
kald
ammatti
elhivatottság
köllunköllun; starfsgrein, fag
天職
aicinājumsnodarbošanāsprofesija
poslanstvo
meslekyatkınlıkyetenek

vocation

[vəʊˈkeɪʃən] N (= calling) → vocación f; (= profession) → profesión f, carrera f
to have a vocation for arttener vocación por el arte
he has missed his vocationse ha equivocado de carrera

vocation

[vəʊˈkeɪʃən] nvocation f
to find one's vocation → trouver sa vocation

vocation

n
(Rel etc) → Berufung f; (form: = profession) → Beruf m; to have a vocation for teachingzum Lehrer berufen sein
(= aptitude)Begabung f, → Talent nt

vocation

[vəʊˈkeɪʃn] nvocazione f
to have a vocation for teaching → avere la vocazione dell'insegnamento

vocation

(vəˈkeiʃən) , ((American) vou-) noun
1. a feeling of having been called (by God), or born etc, to do a particular type of work. He had a sense of vocation about his work as a doctor.
2. the work done, profession entered etc (as a result of such a feeling). Nursing is her vocation; Many people regard teaching as a vocation.

vocation

n. vocación, profesión.
References in classic literature ?
Never; I follow no other than my own high vocation, which is instruction in sacred music
A stain on his conscience, as to anything that came within the range of his vocation, would trouble such a man very much in the same way, though to a far greater degree, than an error in the balance of an account, or an ink-blot on the fair page of a book of record.
He answered, to go to sea again, in his old vocation.
Elsewhere in this volume the slanderous aspersion has been disproved, that the vocation of whaling is throughout a slatternly, untidy business.
What with women and wine and the excitement of his vocation, a man could afford to rest now and then.
In fact, Sam considered oratory as his vocation, and never let slip an opportunity of magnifying his office.
I therefore endeavored to instil hope and courage into his mind, in order that he might dare to engage in a vocation so anomalous and re- sponsible for a person in his situation; and I was seconded in this effort by warm-hearted friends, es- pecially by the late General Agent of the Massa- chusetts Anti-Slavery Society, Mr.
If even this stranger had smiled and been good-humoured to me when I addressed him; if he had put off my offer of assistance gaily and with thanks, I should have gone on my way and not felt any vocation to renew inquiries: but the frown, the roughness of the traveller, set me at my ease: I retained my station when he waved to me to go, and announced -
Joseph remained to hector over tenants and labourers; and because it was his vocation to be where he had plenty of wickedness to reprove.
The plain facts, as stated by the engineer, were briefly these: Frank was not possessed of the necessary abilities to fit him for his new calling; and it was useless to waste time by keeping him any longer in an employment for which he had no vocation.
Having some foundation for believing, by this time, that nature and accident had made me an author, I pursued my vocation with confidence.
In the early years of this century, such a linen-weaver, named Silas Marner, worked at his vocation in a stone cottage that stood among the nutty hedgerows near the village of Raveloe, and not far from the edge of a deserted stone-pit.