vocative

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vocative

Nouns of address (technically called vocatives, but also known as nominatives of address or nouns of direct address) identify the person or group being directly spoken to. Like interjections, they are grammatically unrelated to the rest of the sentence—that is, they don’t modify or affect any other part of it. Instead, they are used to let the listener or reader know who you are addressing, or to get that person’s attention.
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voc·a·tive

 (vŏk′ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Relating to, characteristic of, or used in calling.
2. Of, relating to, or being a grammatical case in certain inflected languages that indicates the person or thing being addressed.
n.
1. The vocative case.
2. A word or form in the vocative case.

[Middle English vocatif, from Old French, from Latin vocātīvus (cāsus), vocative (case), from vocātus, past participle of vocāre, to call; see vocation.]

voc′a·tive·ly adv.

vocative

(ˈvɒkətɪv)
adj
1. relating to, used in, or characterized by calling
2. (Grammar) grammar denoting a case of nouns, in some inflected languages, used when the referent of the noun is being addressed
n
(Grammar) grammar
a. the vocative case
b. a vocative noun or speech element
[C15: from Latin phrase vocātīvus cāsus the calling case, from vocāre to call]
ˈvocatively adv

voc•a•tive

(ˈvɒk ə tɪv)

adj.
1. of or designating a grammatical case, as in Latin, used to indicate that a noun or pronoun refers to the person or thing being addressed.
2. of or used in calling or addressing.
n.
3. the vocative case.
4. a word in this case, as Latin Paule “O Paul.”
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin vocātīvus (cāsus)=vocāt(us), past participle of vocāre to call + -īvus -ive]
voc′a•tive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vocative - the case (in some inflected languages) used when the referent of the noun is being addressed
oblique, oblique case - any grammatical case other than the nominative
Adj.1.vocative - relating to a case used in some languages; "vocative verb endings"
linguistics - the scientific study of language
Translations
pátý pádvokativvokativní
kutsumuksellinenvokatiivinen
vocatifvocationnel
vokativvokativan
megszólítómegszólító eset
ávarpsfall
呼格呼格の天職の
šauksmininkas
aanspreekvorm
vokativ
vocativ
vokativ

vocative

[ˈvɒkətɪv]
A. ADJ vocative casevocativo m
B. Nvocativo m

vocative

[ˈvɒkətɪv] nvocatif m

vocative

nAnredeform f, → Vokativ m; vocative caseAnredefall m, → Vokativ m

vocative

[ˈvɒkətɪv]
1. adjvocativo/a
2. nvocativo
References in classic literature ?
O endless vocatives that would still leave expression slipping helpless from the measurement of mortal folly
Indeed, the entire bhakti tradition is replete with vocatives and imperatives, indicating that the poets anticipate the divine ear and expect consequent divine action.
In the Draft F-10 Australian Curriculum: Languages (Vietnamese) this language resource for expressing attitude has not been included in the content descriptions, even though the polite vocatives, 'da' and 'thua', used to achieve similar effects were explicitly explained in elaboration 2.
in vocatives (Amico mio, vedrai che presto starai meglio.
Mark Allon's survey of the three Ekottarika-agama-type sutras does not afford good comparison, as unfortunately most often the vocatives, if they had been there, would have come at the left hand side of the line, which is missing in the fragments.
According to Pamela Smith, oriki ranges "from a mother's simple morning salutation/praise-appellation to her child to lengthy, ceremonial, professional chanter/drummer vocatives of elaborate proportions, extolling the noble deeds of rulers, orisa, spiritual beings, or even inanimate objects" (352-53).
They also nominate students for turns in the exchanges by using vocatives (Ash, Nina), the affirmative (yes) and gestures such as pointing and nodding.
The key-term is "infer" The audience is aware of an inference--it infers from the interjections and vocatives that the character has (or pretends to have) certain emotions.
4 (Winter 1987): 53-65, also discusses the "vocative thicknesses" of the poem in which "Michael's vocatives deliver a summons" (53).
Vocatives identify the person addressed by their name: prior nomination is assumed.
In poems like "My Last Duchess" or "The Flea," for example, the speaker is clearly addressing an other who, though silent, makes gestures of some kind that elicit a response from him; the movement of the poem is as much defined by the addressee's responses as it is by the speaker's vocatives.
Then, within these speeches, the author studies the effect of the vocatives, the use of metaphors and comparisons, subordination, questions, and the length of the sentences.