vocative

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vocative

Nouns of address (technically called vocatives, but also known as nominatives of address or nouns of direct address) identify the person or group being directly spoken to. Like interjections, they are grammatically unrelated to the rest of the sentence—that is, they don’t modify or affect any other part of it. Instead, they are used to let the listener or reader know who you are addressing, or to get that person’s attention.
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voc·a·tive

 (vŏk′ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Relating to, characteristic of, or used in calling.
2. Of, relating to, or being a grammatical case in certain inflected languages that indicates the person or thing being addressed.
n.
1. The vocative case.
2. A word or form in the vocative case.

[Middle English vocatif, from Old French, from Latin vocātīvus (cāsus), vocative (case), from vocātus, past participle of vocāre, to call; see vocation.]

voc′a·tive·ly adv.

vocative

(ˈvɒkətɪv)
adj
1. relating to, used in, or characterized by calling
2. (Grammar) grammar denoting a case of nouns, in some inflected languages, used when the referent of the noun is being addressed
n
(Grammar) grammar
a. the vocative case
b. a vocative noun or speech element
[C15: from Latin phrase vocātīvus cāsus the calling case, from vocāre to call]
ˈvocatively adv

voc•a•tive

(ˈvɒk ə tɪv)

adj.
1. of or designating a grammatical case, as in Latin, used to indicate that a noun or pronoun refers to the person or thing being addressed.
2. of or used in calling or addressing.
n.
3. the vocative case.
4. a word in this case, as Latin Paule “O Paul.”
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin vocātīvus (cāsus)=vocāt(us), past participle of vocāre to call + -īvus -ive]
voc′a•tive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vocative - the case (in some inflected languages) used when the referent of the noun is being addressed
oblique, oblique case - any grammatical case other than the nominative
Adj.1.vocative - relating to a case used in some languages; "vocative verb endings"
linguistics - the scientific study of language
Translations
pátý pádvokativvokativní
kutsumuksellinenvokatiivinen
vocatifvocationnel
vokativvokativan
megszólítómegszólító eset
ávarpsfall
呼格呼格の天職の
šauksmininkas
aanspreekvorm
vokativ
vocativ
vokativ

vocative

[ˈvɒkətɪv]
A. ADJ vocative casevocativo m
B. Nvocativo m

vocative

[ˈvɒkətɪv] nvocatif m

vocative

nAnredeform f, → Vokativ m; vocative caseAnredefall m, → Vokativ m

vocative

[ˈvɒkətɪv]
1. adjvocativo/a
2. nvocativo
References in classic literature ?
O endless vocatives that would still leave expression slipping helpless from the measurement of mortal folly
Words accompanied by specific markers of the Romanian language, such as enclitic definite articles, suffixes in proper family names, vocatives, diminutives;
Among the topics are whether context changes, the live principles of compositionality, operators for definitions by paraphrase, a truth-conditional account of free-choice disjunction, being tolerant about identity, the property paradox in (not so plain) English, the meaning of fictional texts, the semantics and pragmatics of vocatives, notes on disagreement, and a new type of informative tautology.
In the Draft F-10 Australian Curriculum: Languages (Vietnamese) this language resource for expressing attitude has not been included in the content descriptions, even though the polite vocatives, 'da' and 'thua', used to achieve similar effects were explicitly explained in elaboration 2.
The "interlocutor" utilizes questions, vocatives, and second-person personal pronouns that create the allusion of a conversation and a sense of connection to social actors.
Mark Allon's survey of the three Ekottarika-agama-type sutras does not afford good comparison, as unfortunately most often the vocatives, if they had been there, would have come at the left hand side of the line, which is missing in the fragments.
the use of the vocative mood, with a distinction being made between its absence and the use of the denotative and affective vocatives; 7
Looking at the instances recorded in both corpora, we see that vocatives are typically found in directive speech acts, as they draw the attention of the listener to the illocutionary force of the statement -see the following examples, in addition to (5, 6, 9, 15 and 16) above:
Specific elements considered will be: the syntactic structure of the clause, the verbal and the pronoun systems, the use of tags, the system of polarity with particular reference to negation, quotatives, the expression of vague language, the use of abuse and insult words as vocatives and ways to intensify language.
The key-term is "infer" The audience is aware of an inference--it infers from the interjections and vocatives that the character has (or pretends to have) certain emotions.
Idioms were not included in the analysis, and neither were vocatives of the possessed noun, since with vocatives the possessor is usually obvious (e.
Eberenz propounds that various nominative expressions were used as vocatives in the late Middle Ages; among these we find senor (often in combination with other terms delineating office or profession, such as cura, alcayde, and arzobispo), Vuestra Realeza, Vuestra Majestad (both used to address royalty), Vuestra Paternidad, Vuesttra Reverencia, and Vuestra Senoria (102-05).