vogue


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

vogue

 (vōg)
n.
1. The prevailing fashion, practice, or style: Hoop skirts were once the vogue.
2. Popular acceptance or favor; popularity: a party game no longer in vogue.
intr.v. vogued, vogue·ing or vogu·ing, vogues
To dance by striking a series of rigid, stylized poses, evocative of fashion models during photograph shoots.

[French renown, popularity, from voguer, to row, go forward on the water, be current, from Old French, to row, from Old Italian vogare, perhap of Greek origin and originally referring to the rocking motion of a boat; perhaps akin to Greek baukalān, to lull to sleep. V., after the fashion magazine Vogue.]

vogue

(vəʊɡ)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) the popular style at a specified time (esp in the phrase in vogue)
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a period of general or popular usage or favour: the vogue for such dances is now over.
adj
(Clothing & Fashion) (usually prenominal) popular or fashionable: a vogue word.
[C16: from French: a rowing, fashion, from Old Italian voga, from vogare to row, of unknown origin]
ˈvoguish adj
ˈvoguishly adv
ˈvoguishness n

vogue

(voʊg)

n.
1. the prevailing fashion at a particular time; mode.
2. popular currency, acceptance, or favor; popularity: The book is having a great vogue.
adj.
3. currently fashionable or popular: vogue words.
[1565–75; < Middle French: wave or course of success < Italian voga rowing, stroke, derivative of vogare to row, of uncertain orig.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vogue - the popular taste at a given timevogue - the popular taste at a given time; "leather is the latest vogue"; "he followed current trends"; "the 1920s had a style of their own"
appreciation, discernment, perceptiveness, taste - delicate discrimination (especially of aesthetic values); "arrogance and lack of taste contributed to his rapid success"; "to ask at that particular time was the ultimate in bad taste"
New Look - a style of women's clothing created by Christian Dior in 1947; involved a tight bodice and narrow waist and a flowing pleated skirt
fashion - the latest and most admired style in clothes and cosmetics and behavior
bandwagon - a popular trend that attracts growing support; "when they saw how things were going everybody jumped on the bandwagon"
2.vogue - a current state of general acceptance and use
acceptance - the state of being acceptable and accepted; "torn jeans received no acceptance at the country club"

vogue

noun
1. fashion, trend, craze, style, the latest, the thing (informal), mode, last word, the rage, passing fancy, dernier cri (French) the new vogue for herbal medicines
adjective
1. fashionable, trendy (Brit. informal), in, now (informal), popular, with it (informal), prevalent, up-to-the-minute, modish, the new, du jour (French), voguish, culty The word `talisman' has become a vogue word in sports writing.
in vogue popular, big, fashionable, all the rage, happening, accepted, current, cool, in favour, stylish, up to date, in use, prevalent, up to the minute, modish, the new, du jour (French), trendsetting, culty Pale colours are in vogue this season.

vogue

noun
The current custom:
Informal: thing.
Idioms: the in thing, the last word, the latest thing.
Translations
موضَه، طِراز
móda
mode
tíska
mode

vogue

[vəʊg]
A. Nmoda f
to be in vogue; be the vogueestar en boga or de moda
the vogue for short skirtsla moda de la falda corta
B. CPD vogue word Npalabra f que está de moda

vogue

[ˈvəʊg] nvogue f
the vogue for sth → la vogue de qch
to be in vogue → être en vogue
to come into vogue → devenir en vogue

vogue

nMode f; the vogue for jeansdie Jeansmode; to be the vogue or in vogue(in) Mode or en vogue sein; to come into vogue (clothes)in Mode kommen, modern werden; (writers)populär werden, in Mode kommen; to go out of vogue (clothes)aus der Mode kommen, unmodern werden; (writers)aus der Mode kommen; to enjoy a great vogue withsehr beliebt sein unter (+dat), → große Mode sein unter (+dat)

vogue

[vəʊg] n (fashion) → moda; (popularity) → voga
to be in vogue, be the vogue → essere di moda, essere in voga

vogue

(vəug) noun
a fashion. Short hair is the vogue.
in vogue
fashionable. The French style of dress is in vogue just now.
References in classic literature ?
Therefore, Sweet railed at Pitman as vainly as Thersites railed at Ajax: his raillery, however it may have eased his soul, gave no popular vogue to Current Shorthand.
I ought not to omit from the list of these favorites an author who was then beginning to have his greatest vogue, and who somehow just missed of being a very great one.
Following the simple, old-fashioned way in vogue then, Anne went down to the parlor on Gilbert's arm.
I do not know whether hotel servants in New York get any wages or not, but I do know that in some of the hotels there the feeing system in vogue is a heavy burden.
How- ever, even inquests went out of vogue at last, and ceased to torture Tom's conscience.
He said, "that new systems of nature were but new fashions, which would vary in every age; and even those, who pretend to demonstrate them from mathematical principles, would flourish but a short period of time, and be out of vogue when that was determined.
There was a vast difference noticeable between these consummate apparatuses and the old cork breastplates, jackets, and other contrivances in vogue during the eighteenth century.
I never could endure this compound, and indeed the preparation is not greatly in vogue among the more polite Typees.
She used the word "diplomat," which was just then much in vogue among the children, in the special sense they attached to it.
Lord Greystoke was immaculately and appropriately garbed--to the minutest detail he was vogue.
In order to give the thing vogue from the start, and place it out of the reach of criticism, I chose my nines by rank, not capacity.
But indeed, at that time, putting to death was a recipe much in vogue with all trades and professions, and not least of all with Tellson's.