volatile


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vol·a·tile

 (vŏl′ə-tl, -tīl′)
adj.
1. Chemistry
a. Evaporating readily at normal temperatures and pressures.
b. Capable of being readily vaporized.
2.
a. Tending to vary often or widely, as in price: the ups and downs of volatile stocks.
b. Inconstant; fickle: a flirt's volatile affections.
c. Lighthearted; flighty: in a volatile mood.
d. Ephemeral; fleeting.
3. Tending to violence; explosive: a volatile situation with troops and rioters eager for a confrontation.
4. Flying or capable of flying; volant.
5. Computers Of or relating to memory whose data is erased when the memory's power is interrupted.

[French, from Old French, from Latin volātilis, flying, from volātus, past participle of volāre, to fly.]

vol′a·tile n.
vol′a·til′i·ty (-tĭl′ĭ-tē), vol′a·tile·ness (-tl-nĭs, -tīl′-) n.

volatile

(ˈvɒləˌtaɪl)
adj
1. (Chemistry) (of a substance) capable of readily changing from a solid or liquid form to a vapour; having a high vapour pressure and a low boiling point
2. (of persons) disposed to caprice or inconstancy; fickle; mercurial
3. (of circumstances) liable to sudden, unpredictable, or explosive change
4. lasting only a short time: volatile business interests.
5. (Computer Science) computing (of a memory) not retaining stored information when the power supply is cut off
6. obsolete flying or capable of flight; volant
n
7. (Chemistry) a volatile substance
8. rare a winged creature
[C17: from Latin volātīlis flying, from volāre to fly]
ˈvolatileness, volatility n

vol•a•tile

(ˈvɒl ə tl, -tɪl; esp. Brit. -ˌtaɪl)

adj.
1. evaporating rapidly; passing off readily in the form of vapor: Acetone is a volatile solvent.
2. tending or threatening to break out into open violence; explosive: a volatile political situation.
3. characterized by or liable to sharp or sudden changes; unstable: a volatile stock market.
4. changeable, as in mood or temper; mercurial; flighty.
5. fleeting; transient.
6. (of computer storage) not retaining data when electrical power is turned off.
7. Archaic. flying or able to fly.
n.
8. a volatile substance, as a gas or solvent.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Latin volātilis able to fly =volā(re) to fly + -tilis -tile]
vol`a•til′i•ty (-ˈtɪl ɪ ti) vol′a•tile•ness, n.

vol·a·tile

(vŏl′ə-tl)
Changing easily from liquid to vapor at normal temperatures and pressures.

volatile

Describes a substance which readily turns into a vapor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.volatile - a volatile substance; a substance that changes readily from solid or liquid to a vapor; "it was heated to evaporate the volatiles"
substance - the real physical matter of which a person or thing consists; "DNA is the substance of our genes"
Adj.1.volatile - evaporating readily at normal temperatures and pressuresvolatile - evaporating readily at normal temperatures and pressures; "volatile oils"; "volatile solvents"
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
inconstant - likely to change frequently often without apparent or cogent reason; variable; "inconstant affections"; "an inconstant lover"; "swear not by...the inconstant moon"- Shakespeare
nonvolatile, nonvolatilisable, nonvolatilizable - not volatilizing readily; "a nonvolatile acid"
2.volatile - liable to lead to sudden change or violencevolatile - liable to lead to sudden change or violence; "an explosive issue"; "a volatile situation with troops and rioters eager for a confrontation"
unstable - lacking stability or fixity or firmness; "unstable political conditions"; "the tower proved to be unstable in the high wind"; "an unstable world economy"
3.volatile - marked by erratic changeableness in affections or attachments; "fickle friends"; "a flirt's volatile affections"
inconstant - likely to change frequently often without apparent or cogent reason; variable; "inconstant affections"; "an inconstant lover"; "swear not by...the inconstant moon"- Shakespeare
4.volatile - tending to vary often or widely; "volatile stocks"; "volatile emotions"
changeful, changeable - such that alteration is possible; having a marked tendency to change; "changeable behavior"; "changeable moods"; "changeable prices"

volatile

adjective
1. changeable, shifting, variable, unsettled, unstable, explosive, unreliable, unsteady, inconstant There have been riots before and the situation is volatile.
changeable stable, constant, steady, inert, settled
2. temperamental, erratic, mercurial, up and down (informal), fickle, whimsical, giddy, flighty, over-emotional, inconstant She has a volatile temperament.
temperamental calm, consistent, reliable, sober, self-controlled, dependable, cool-headed
3. unstable, explosive, inflammable, labile (technical), eruptive when volatile chemicals explode

volatile

adjective
Translations
prchavý
volatil
epävakaa
揮発性爆弾発破

volatile

[ˈvɒlətaɪl] ADJ
1. (Chem) → volátil
2. (= unstable) [person] → voluble; [situation, atmosphere, market] → inestable, volátil
3. (Comput) volatile memorymemoria f no permanente

volatile

[ˈvɒlətaɪl] adj
(= unstable) [situation, atmosphere, market] → volatil(e)
[person] → d'humeur volatile; [mood, temper] → volatil(e)
(CHEMISTRY) [liquid, chemicals, substance] → volatil(e)

volatile

adj
(Chem) → flüchtig
person (in moods) → impulsiv; (in interests) → sprunghaft; (Psych: = unpredictable) → sprunghaft; relationshipwechselhaft; political situationbrisant; (St Ex) → unbeständig; a person with a volatile temperein sehr unberechenbarer Mensch
(Comput) volatile memoryflüchtiger Speicher

volatile

[ˈvɒləˌtaɪl] adj (Chem) → volatile (fig) (situation) → esplosivo/a; (character) → volubile

vol·a·tile

a. volátil, que se evapora fácilmente.
References in classic literature ?
the mud of Paris is particularly stinking; it must contain a great deal of volatile and nitric salts.
I confess that I was so indifferent to everything, so profoundly demoralized, that having once got into that drawing-room I hadn't the strength to get away; though I could see perfectly well my volatile hostess going from one to another of her acquaintances in order to tell them with a little gesture, "Look
The sum of his discourse was to this effect: "That about forty years ago, certain persons went up to Laputa, either upon business or diversion, and, after five months continuance, came back with a very little smattering in mathematics, but full of volatile spirits acquired in that airy region: that these persons, upon their return, began to dislike the management of every thing below, and fell into schemes of putting all arts, sciences, languages, and mechanics, upon a new foot.
They want more fenders, more breasting- ropes; they want more springs, more shackles, more fetters; they want to make ships with volatile souls as motionless as square blocks of stone.
For once our volatile and exuberant spirits are hopelessly subdued.
This last was difficult to a volatile person (I am sure that to the Fynes I was a volatile person) and the amusement in itself was not very great; but still--in the country--away from all mental stimulants
The phial, to which I next turned my attention, might have been about half full of a blood-red liquor, which was highly pungent to the sense of smell and seemed to me to contain phosphorus and some volatile ether.
In the universal decay this volatile substance had chanced to survive, perhaps through many thousands of centuries.
It is evident that men incline to call those conditions habits which are of a more or less permanent type and difficult to displace; for those who are not retentive of knowledge, but volatile, are not said to have such and such a 'habit' as regards knowledge, yet they are disposed, we may say, either better or worse, towards knowledge.
Adolph and Rosa had arranged the chamber; volatile, fickle and childish, as they generally were, they were soft-hearted and full of feeling; and, while Miss Ophelia presided over the general details of order and neatness, it was their hands that added those soft, poetic touches to the arrangements, that took from the death-room the grim and ghastly air which too often marks a New England funeral.
Arch, volatile, a sportive bird, By social glee inspired; Ambitious to be seen or heard, And pleased to be admired
It was after the early supper-time at the Red House, and the entertainment was in that stage when bashfulness itself had passed into easy jollity, when gentlemen, conscious of unusual accomplishments, could at length be prevailed on to dance a hornpipe, and when the Squire preferred talking loudly, scattering snuff, and patting his visitors' backs, to sitting longer at the whist-table--a choice exasperating to uncle Kimble, who, being always volatile in sober business hours, became intense and bitter over cards and brandy, shuffled before his adversary's deal with a glare of suspicion, and turned up a mean trump-card with an air of inexpressible disgust, as if in a world where such things could happen one might as well enter on a course of reckless profligacy.