volition


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vo·li·tion

 (və-lĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of making a conscious choice or decision: He left of his own volition.
2. The power or faculty of choosing; the will: as long as I can exercise my volition.

[French, from Medieval Latin volitiō, volitiōn-, from Latin velle, vol-, to wish; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

vo·li′tion·al adj.
vo·li′tion·al·ly adv.

volition

(vəˈlɪʃən)
n
1. the act of exercising the will: of one's own volition.
2. the faculty or capability of conscious choice, decision, and intention; the will
3. the resulting choice or resolution
4. (Philosophy) philosophy an act of will as distinguished from the physical movement it intends to bring about
[C17: from Medieval Latin volitiō, from Latin vol- as in volō I will, present stem of velle to wish]
voˈlitional, voˈlitionary adj
voˈlitionally adv

vo•li•tion

(voʊˈlɪʃ ən, və-)

n.
1. the act of willing, choosing, or resolving; exercise of the will: She left of her own volition.
2. the power of willing or choosing; will.
3. a choice or decision made by the will.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin volitiō, derivative of Latin vol-, variant s. of velle to want, wish (see will1)]
vo•li′tion•al, vo•li′tion•ar`y, adj.
vo•li′tion•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.volition - the capability of conscious choice and decision and intentionvolition - the capability of conscious choice and decision and intention; "the exercise of their volition we construe as revolt"- George Meredith
faculty, mental faculty, module - one of the inherent cognitive or perceptual powers of the mind
velleity - volition in its weakest form
2.volition - the act of making a choicevolition - the act of making a choice; "followed my father of my own volition"
selection, choice, option, pick - the act of choosing or selecting; "your choice of colors was unfortunate"; "you can take your pick"
intention - an act of intending; a volition that you intend to carry out; "my intention changed once I saw her"

volition

noun free will, will, choice, election, choosing, option, purpose, resolution, determination, preference, discretion committing crimes of violence through cold, premeditated volition
of your own volition of your own free will, voluntarily Mr Coombes had gone to the police of his own volition.

volition

noun
The mental faculty by which one deliberately chooses or decides:
Translations

volition

[vəˈlɪʃən] N of one's own volition (frm) → por voluntad (propia), de libre albedrío

volition

[vəˈlɪʃən] nvolonté f
of one's own volition → de son propre gré

volition

nWille m; simply by the exercise of your volitionmit dem Willen allein; of one’s own volitionaus freiem Willen

volition

[vəˈlɪʃn] n of one's own volitiondi propria volontà

vo·li·tion

n. volición, voluntad, poder de determinación.
References in classic literature ?
But as she sat there amid her guests, she felt the old ennui overtaking her; the hopelessness which so often assailed her, which came upon her like an obsession, like something extraneous, independent of volition.
These fearful precursors of a coming struggle produced no change in the countenances and movements of his three guides, so far as Duncan could discover, except that the strokes of their paddles were longer and more in unison, and caused the little bark to spring forward like a creature possessing life and volition.
In fact, entirely as she loved him, Hepzibah could hardly have borne any longer the wretched duty--so impracticable by her few and rigid faculties --of seeking pastime for a still sensitive, but ruined mind, critical and fastidious, without force or volition.
It seemed as though, by some nameless, interior volition, he would fain have shocked into them the same fiery emotion accumulated within the Leyden jar of his own magnetic life.
I think that all this indirectly proceeds from the helpless perplexity of volition, in which their divided and diametrically opposite powers of vision must involve them.
Tell me that any man living wants to work all his days, from day-dawn till dark, under the constant eye of a master, without the power of putting forth one irresponsible volition, on the same dreary, monotonous, unchanging toil, and all for two pairs of pantaloons and a pair of shoes a year, with enough food and shelter to keep him in working order
She would show the glittering arch of her upper third, occasionally, and scrape it along behind the comblike row; sometimes a pinnacle stood straight up, like a statuette of ebony, against that glittering white shield, then seemed to glide out of it by its own volition and power, and become a dim specter, while the next pinnacle glided into its place and blotted the spotless disk with the black exclamation-point of its presence.
In this state, the waiter's dismal intelligence about the ships immediately connected itself, without any effort of my volition, with my uneasiness about Ham.
In the horrid pain and surprise of the moment--I scarce can say it was by my own volition, and I am sure it was without a conscious aim-- both my pistols went off, and both escaped out of my hands.
Sense, perception, judgment, desire, volition, memory, imagination, are found to be separated by such delicate shades and minute gradations that their boundaries have eluded the most subtle investigations, and remain a pregnant source of ingenious disquisition and controversy.
Nevertheless, we perfectly well recognize the different mental states of volition implied in "lying", "sitting", and "standing", which are to some extent indicated to a beholder by a slight increase of lustre corresponding to the increase of volition.
Sola, who had accompanied the searching party of her own volition, was the only one of the Martians whose face had not been twisted in laughter as I battled for my life.