voluble


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

vol·u·ble

 (vŏl′yə-bəl)
adj.
1. Marked by a ready flow of speech; fluent.
2.
a. Turning easily on an axis; rotating.
b. Botany Twining or twisting: a voluble vine.

[Middle English, moving easily, from Old French, from Latin volūbilis, revolving, fluent, from volvere, to roll; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

vol′u·bil′i·ty, vol′u·ble·ness n.
vol′u·bly adv.

voluble

(ˈvɒljʊbəl)
adj
1. talking easily, readily, and at length; fluent
2. archaic easily turning or rotating, as on an axis
3. (Botany) rare (of a plant) twining or twisting
[C16: from Latin volūbilis turning readily, fluent, from volvere to turn]
ˌvoluˈbility, ˈvolubleness n
ˈvolubly adv

vol•u•ble

(ˈvɒl yə bəl)

adj.
characterized by a ready and continuous flow of words; fluent; glib; talkative.
[1565–75; < Latin volūbilis, derivative of volvere to turn]
vol`u•bil′i•ty, vol′u•ble•ness, n.
vol′u•bly, adv.
syn: See fluent.

voluble

- "Flowing with speech, talkative"; such a person has words "rolling" off his or her tongue.
See also related terms for rolling.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.voluble - marked by a ready flow of speech; "she is an extremely voluble young woman who engages in soliloquies not conversations"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"
taciturn - habitually reserved and uncommunicative

voluble

adjective talkative, garrulous, loquacious, forthcoming, articulate, fluent, glib, blessed with the gift of the gab Bert is a voluble, gregarious man.
reticent, taciturn, unforthcoming, hesitant, terse, succinct, inarticulate, tongue-tied

voluble

adjective
Given to conversation:
Slang: gabby.
Translations

voluble

[ˈvɒljʊbl] ADJ [person] → locuaz; [speech] → prolijo

voluble

[ˈvɒljʊbəl] adjvolubile

voluble

adj speakerredegewandt, redselig (pej); protestwortreich

voluble

[ˈvɒljʊbl] adjloquace
References in classic literature ?
Stroeve, with voluble tongue, explained how he and I had met, and by what an accident we discovered that we both knew Strickland.
She always besieged the bench with voluble excuses, explanations, apologies and prayers.
There the voluble mouth and bright penetrating eye are ever directed towards the Master of the household; and light itself is not more persistent than the stream of feminine discourse.
About the period when the churches convene at Edinburgh in their annual assemblies, he was to be seen descending the Mound in the company of divers red-headed clergymen: these voluble, he only contributing oracular nods, brief negatives, and the austere spectacle of his stretched upper lip.
And when he saw Cocky, one day, perched and voluble, on the twisted fingers of Kwaque's left hand, Ah Moy discovered such instant distaste for the bird that not even eighteen shillings, coupled with possession of Cocky and possible contact, had any value to him.
I vaguely heard the voluble landlady's expressions of sympathy and regret; I mechanically took the smelling-bottle which my husband's mother offered to me, after hearing my name, as an act of kindness to a stranger
But the best, in my opinion, was the home life in the little flat-- the ardent, voluble chats after the day's study; the cozy dinners and fresh, light breakfasts; the interchange of ambitions--ambitions interwoven each with the other's or else inconsiderable--the mutual help and inspiration; and--overlook my artlessness--stuffed olives and cheese sandwiches at 11 p.
They were learning to swear in voluble English; they were learning to pick up cigar stumps and smoke them, to pass hours of their time gambling with pennies and dice and cigarette cards; they were learning the location of all the houses of prostitution on the "Levee," and the names of the "madames" who kept them, and the days when they gave their state banquets, which the police captains and the big politicians all attended.
Others had made the same attempt, and there was a household of Blenkers--an intense and voluble mother, and three blowsy daughters who imitated her--where one met Edwin Booth and Patti and William Winter, and the new Shakespearian actor George Rignold, and some of the magazine editors and musical and literary critics.
The boarding-house to which they had been directed was kept by a bustling maiden lady, with shrewd eyes and voluble speech.
She was one of those big, overpowering women, with blunt manners, voluble tongues, and goggle eyes, who carry everything before them.
Mercedes Higgins was voluble as a Greek, and wandered on in reminiscence.