voluble


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vol·u·ble

 (vŏl′yə-bəl)
adj.
1. Marked by a ready flow of speech; fluent.
2.
a. Turning easily on an axis; rotating.
b. Botany Twining or twisting: a voluble vine.

[Middle English, moving easily, from Old French, from Latin volūbilis, revolving, fluent, from volvere, to roll; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

vol′u·bil′i·ty, vol′u·ble·ness n.
vol′u·bly adv.

voluble

(ˈvɒljʊbəl)
adj
1. talking easily, readily, and at length; fluent
2. archaic easily turning or rotating, as on an axis
3. (Botany) rare (of a plant) twining or twisting
[C16: from Latin volūbilis turning readily, fluent, from volvere to turn]
ˌvoluˈbility, ˈvolubleness n
ˈvolubly adv

vol•u•ble

(ˈvɒl yə bəl)

adj.
characterized by a ready and continuous flow of words; fluent; glib; talkative.
[1565–75; < Latin volūbilis, derivative of volvere to turn]
vol`u•bil′i•ty, vol′u•ble•ness, n.
vol′u•bly, adv.
syn: See fluent.

voluble

- "Flowing with speech, talkative"; such a person has words "rolling" off his or her tongue.
See also related terms for rolling.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.voluble - marked by a ready flow of speech; "she is an extremely voluble young woman who engages in soliloquies not conversations"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"
taciturn - habitually reserved and uncommunicative

voluble

adjective talkative, garrulous, loquacious, forthcoming, articulate, fluent, glib, blessed with the gift of the gab Bert is a voluble, gregarious man.
reticent, taciturn, unforthcoming, hesitant, terse, succinct, inarticulate, tongue-tied

voluble

adjective
Given to conversation:
Slang: gabby.
Translations

voluble

[ˈvɒljʊbl] ADJ [person] → locuaz; [speech] → prolijo

voluble

[ˈvɒljʊbəl] adjvolubile

voluble

adj speakerredegewandt, redselig (pej); protestwortreich

voluble

[ˈvɒljʊbl] adjloquace
References in classic literature ?
They were learning to swear in voluble English; they were learning to pick up cigar stumps and smoke them, to pass hours of their time gambling with pennies and dice and cigarette cards; they were learning the location of all the houses of prostitution on the "Levee," and the names of the "madames" who kept them, and the days when they gave their state banquets, which the police captains and the big politicians all attended.
Sambo was a full black, of great size, very lively, voluble, and full of trick and grimace.
What was said in this disappointing anti-climax, by the disciples of the Good Republican Brutus of Antiquity, except that it was something very voluble and loud, would have been as so much Hebrew or Chaldean to Miss Pross and her protector, though they had been all ears.
Neererhe drew, and many a walk travers'd Of stateliest Covert, Cedar, Pine, or Palme, Then voluble and bold, now hid, now seen Among thick-wov'n Arborets and Flours Imborderd on each Bank, the hand of EVE: Spot more delicious then those Gardens feign'd Or of reviv'd ADONIS, or renownd ALCINOUS, host of old LAERTES Son, Or that, not Mystic, where the Sapient King Held dalliance with his faire EGYPTIAN Spouse.
There the voluble mouth and bright penetrating eye are ever directed towards the Master of the household; and light itself is not more persistent than the stream of feminine discourse.
About the period when the churches convene at Edinburgh in their annual assemblies, he was to be seen descending the Mound in the company of divers red-headed clergymen: these voluble, he only contributing oracular nods, brief negatives, and the austere spectacle of his stretched upper lip.
But Billy Kirby was a fearless wight, and had great jealousy of foreign dictation; he had risen on his feet, and turned his back to the fire, during the voluble delivery of this interrogatory; and when the steward ended, contrary to all expectation, he gave the following spirited reply:
Cheyne could not sympathise with the creed, but she ended by respecting the brown, voluble little man.
It brought the farmer, voluble, stuttering with gratitude.
The low, voluble delivery was enough by itself to compel my attention.
Gryce's eyes and he became voluble, not to say violent.
Others had made the same attempt, and there was a household of Blenkers--an intense and voluble mother, and three blowsy daughters who imitated her--where one met Edwin Booth and Patti and William Winter, and the new Shakespearian actor George Rignold, and some of the magazine editors and musical and literary critics.