voluntarily


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Related to voluntarily: vindication, elusive, relinquish

vol·un·tar·y

 (vŏl′ən-tĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Done or undertaken of one's own free will: a voluntary decision to leave the job.
2. Acting or done willingly and without constraint or expectation of reward: a voluntary hostage; voluntary community work.
3. Normally controlled by or subject to individual volition: voluntary muscle contractions.
4. Capable of making choices; having the faculty of will: "This law of happiness ... resides in the exercise of the active capacities of a voluntary agent" (John Dewey).
5. Supported by contributions or charitable donations rather than by government appropriations: voluntary hospitals.
6. Law
a. Without legal obligation or consideration: a voluntary conveyance of property.
b. Done intentionally but without premeditation or deliberation, as when under the influence of an intense emotional reaction: voluntary manslaughter.
n. pl. vol·un·tar·ies
1. Music
a. A short piece of music, often improvised on a solo instrument, played as an introduction to a larger work.
b. A piece for solo organ, often improvised, played before, during, or after a religious service.
2. A volunteer.

[Middle English, from Latin voluntārius, from voluntās, choice, from velle, vol-, to wish; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

vol′un·tar′i·ly (-târ′ə-lē) adv.
vol′un·tar′i·ness n.
Synonyms: voluntary, intentional, deliberate, willful, willing
These adjectives mean being or resulting from one's own free will. Voluntary implies the operation of unforced choice: "Ignorance, when it is voluntary, is criminal" (Samuel Johnson).
Intentional applies to something undertaken to further a plan or realize an aim: "I will abstain from all intentional wrongdoing and harm" (Hippocratic Oath).
Deliberate stresses premeditation and full awareness of the character and consequences of one's acts: taking deliberate and decisive action. Willful implies deliberate, headstrong persistence in a self-determined course of action: a willful waste of time. Willing suggests ready or cheerful acquiescence in the proposals or requirements of another: "The first requisite of a good citizen ... is that he shall be able and willing to pull his weight" (Theodore Roosevelt).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.voluntarily - out of your own free will; "he voluntarily submitted to the fingerprinting"
involuntarily - against your will; "he was involuntarily held against his will"

voluntarily

adverb willingly, freely, by choice, without being asked, without prompting, lief (rare), on your own initiative, of your own free will, off your own bat, of your own accord, of your own volition I would never leave this country voluntarily.

voluntarily

adverb
Of one's own free will:
Idioms: of one's own accord, on one's own volition.
Translations
طَوْعاًطَوْعِيّا، تَطَوُّعِيَّا
dobrovolně
frivilligt
vapaaehtoisesti
dobrovoljno
önkéntesen
viljandi; af fúsum og frjálsum vilja
自発的に
자발적으로
dobrovoľne
prostovoljno
frivilligt
อย่างสมัครใจ
tình nguyện

voluntarily

[ˈvɒləntərɪlɪ] ADV
1. (= freely) → voluntariamente, por voluntad propia
2. (= for no payment) [work] → como voluntario

voluntarily

[ˈvɒləntərɪli] adv
(= willingly) [leave] → volontairement
(= unpaid) [work] → bénévolement

voluntarily

advfreiwillig, von sich aus; (= unpaid) workehrenamtlich

voluntarily

[ˈvɒləntrɪlɪ] advspontaneamente, volontariamente

voluntary

(ˈvoləntəri) , ((American) volənˈteri) adjective
1. done, given etc by choice, not by accident or because of being forced (often without pay). Their action was completely voluntary – nobody asked them to do that.
2. run, financed etc by such actions, contributions etc. He does a lot of work for a voluntary organization.
voluntarily (ˈvoləntərəli (American) volənˈterili) adverb

voluntarily

طَوْعاً dobrovolně frivilligt freiwillig εκουσίως voluntariamente vapaaehtoisesti volontairement dobrovoljno volontariamente 自発的に 자발적으로 vrijwillig frivillig dobrowolnie voluntariamente добровольно frivilligt อย่างสมัครใจ gönüllü olarak tình nguyện 自愿地
References in classic literature ?
This unassuming style promotes study, that's why we adopt it," returned Laurie, who certainly could not be accused of vanity, having voluntarily sacrificed a handsome curly crop to the demand for quarterinch-long stubble.
Her own room was in an obscure corner and when she felt able to work she voluntarily worked among the beds, preferring the labor that could be done when the guests were abroad seeking trade among the merchants of Winesburg.
Such a spiritual sneer might have conceived, that, after sustaining the gaze of the multitude through several miserable years as a necessity, a penance, and something which it was a stern religion to endure, she now, for one last time more, encountered it freely and voluntarily, in order to convert what had so long been agony into a kind of triumph.
The inspiration-- I can call it by no other name--was that I felt how voluntarily, how transcendently, I MIGHT.
In his youth Daggoo had voluntarily shipped on board of a whaler, lying in a lonely bay on his native coast.
Do you suppose it possible that a nation ever will voluntarily emancipate?
My civil neighbor, the tax-gatherer, is the very man I have to deal with--for it is, after all, with men and not with parchment that I quarrel--and he has voluntarily chosen to be an agent of the government.
I did it; and after a little he had the idea, and he brought his fist down and said HE didn't believe a nation where every man had a vote would voluntarily get down in the mud and dirt in any such way; and that to steal from a nation its will and preference must be a crime and the first of all crimes.
By agreement, the conversation in Roxy's presence was all about the man's "up-country" farm, and how pleasant a place it was, and how happy the slaves were there; so poor Roxy was entirely deceived; and easily, for she was not dreaming that her own son could be guilty of treason to a mother who, in voluntarily going into slavery--slavery of any kind, mild or severe, or of any duration, brief or long--was making a sacrifice for him compared with which death would have been a poor and commonplace one.
Two of the children always remained for the sermon voluntarily, and the other always remained too -- for stronger reasons.
Harriet was not insensible of manner; she had voluntarily noticed her father's gentleness with admiration as well as wonder.
The agony of grief which overpowered them at first, was voluntarily renewed, was sought for, was created again and again.