voluntarism

(redirected from voluntarist)
Also found in: Financial, Encyclopedia.

vol·un·ta·rism

 (vŏl′ən-tə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. The use of or reliance on voluntary action to maintain an institution, carry out a policy, or achieve an end.
2. A theory or doctrine that regards the will as the fundamental principle of the individual or of the universe.

vol′un·ta·rist n.
vol′un·ta·ris′tic adj.

voluntarism

(ˈvɒləntəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that the will rather than the intellect is the ultimate principle of reality
2. a doctrine or system based on voluntary participation in a course of action
3. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the belief that the state, government, and the law should not interfere with the procedures of collective bargaining and of trade union organization
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another name for voluntaryism
ˈvoluntarist n, adj
ˌvoluntaˈristic adj

vol•un•ta•rism

(ˈvɒl ən təˌrɪz əm)

n.
1. any theory that regards will as the fundamental agency or principle, in metaphysics, epistemology, or psychology.
2. the principle or practice of supporting schools, hospitals, churches, etc., by voluntary contributions or aid instead of relying on government assistance.
3. any policy based on voluntary action.
[1830–40]
vol′un•ta•rist, n., adj.
vol`un•ta•ris′tic, adj.

voluntarism

any theory that regards the will rather than the intellect as the fundamental agency or principle in human activities and experience, as Nietzscheism. — voluntarist, n.voluntaristic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
Translations

voluntarism

[ˈvɒləntərɪzəm] Nvoluntariado m

voluntarism

n no plVoluntarismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
The signature of several large contracts to be rolled out during 2004, coupled with a voluntarist acquisition program within the customer service and technical support areas, will enable the group to consolidate this position in 2004.
105) Indeed, as Johann Sommerville has pointed out, this aspect of Selden's thought is not unique; rather, it "was that of a conventional voluntarist," and Selden was interpreted as such by contemporaries.
We should note that for several years more than 50 per cent of the agency s revenues, excluding those from the state, come from international sales where the agency expects to see the fruits of its voluntarist policies despite the economic context.
Although Benedict begins his lecture with Islam, it becomes clear in his subsequent remarks that his principal object is the Christian West, and especially the dangerous nominalist and voluntarist elements in modern Christianity driving it in the direction of Islam.
To take an example, evolutionary accounts can cite selected traits and functions, which tie our sort of normative behaviour to purposive systems in the natural world, whereas voluntarist ones can focus on features of human agency to make certain rules binding and answer the normative question 'why should I do this?
Benjamin Libet's influential publications have raised important questions about voluntarist accounts of action.
It is a subjective, or voluntarist understanding of class because it views class as occurring when people form an awareness, or subjectivity, of themselves as a class, or when they voluntarily organize themselves into a class.
several contemporary voluntarist accounts of marriage.
In order to be credible, the commitments made by the Parties at the international level should be based on voluntarist actions at global and local level.
Tracey Rowland shows how in Regensburg Benedict tried to demonstrate that "Islam and modern secularism share the same voluntarist tendency.
Finally, a more philosophical disagreement: Siedentop's account pits a liberated, individualist, voluntarist Christianity against a paganism bound by family, cult, reason, and nature.
Indeed, the precise mechanisms of countersubversion in this early period remain cloudy and the agency of the lead actors unclear: how were the Wilsonians in the government the "ringleaders" when the voluntarist groups conducted their countersubversion "in the name of the government but without official sanction.