voluntarism

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vol·un·ta·rism

 (vŏl′ən-tə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. The use of or reliance on voluntary action to maintain an institution, carry out a policy, or achieve an end.
2. A theory or doctrine that regards the will as the fundamental principle of the individual or of the universe.

vol′un·ta·rist n.
vol′un·ta·ris′tic adj.

voluntarism

(ˈvɒləntəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that the will rather than the intellect is the ultimate principle of reality
2. a doctrine or system based on voluntary participation in a course of action
3. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the belief that the state, government, and the law should not interfere with the procedures of collective bargaining and of trade union organization
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another name for voluntaryism
ˈvoluntarist n, adj
ˌvoluntaˈristic adj

vol•un•ta•rism

(ˈvɒl ən təˌrɪz əm)

n.
1. any theory that regards will as the fundamental agency or principle, in metaphysics, epistemology, or psychology.
2. the principle or practice of supporting schools, hospitals, churches, etc., by voluntary contributions or aid instead of relying on government assistance.
3. any policy based on voluntary action.
[1830–40]
vol′un•ta•rist, n., adj.
vol`un•ta•ris′tic, adj.

voluntarism

any theory that regards the will rather than the intellect as the fundamental agency or principle in human activities and experience, as Nietzscheism. — voluntarist, n.voluntaristic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
Translations

voluntarism

[ˈvɒləntərɪzəm] Nvoluntariado m

voluntarism

n no plVoluntarismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
As Siedentop argues, this voluntaristic shift, together with the movements toward equality, popular sovereignty, natural rights, and parliamentary representation, formed exactly the foundation modern liberalism needed to get started.
When Church discipline loses its sting, Church membership becomes voluntaristic, and ecclesiastical authority becomes limited to rhetorical persuasion, a secularizing trend is at work, banishing God to some purely private sphere, in effect, if not also in theory.
Since this revitalization is to be carried out by the members of the lifeworld, the decolonization is only possible through their communicative action, moral discourse, and voluntaristic movement to promote their shared values and visions.
This new community is based on voluntaristic Christian moral principles, not on greed or selfishness.
Both its fabled 'positivity' and its quickness to blame arise from a comfortingly voluntaristic conception of politics, in which Scotland's problems can be attributed to malign foreign institutions that are wilfully frustrating the natural genius of its people.
61) And a further supportive claim appears in their work: Cooter and Siegel consider and reject alternative voluntaristic solutions to collective action problems, at least when more than a handful of states are involved.
The possibility of seizing the occasion, in a voluntaristic act of timely decision, can never be disregarded in advance, hence its fateful character--but it should also be noted that neither can it be planned for.
This resignification is possible not by virtue of an autonomous, voluntaristic subject, but through the creative possibilities offered by the dual nature of power which Butler derives from Foucault (Foucault, 1990:82-96).
Royal police ordinances in early modern Sweden; the emergence of voluntaristic understanding of law.
While being more concerted and more comprehensive at the provincial level than at the national level, the autonomous professional project's jurisdictional claim in the public arena is not still strong enough to control settlement work to the exclusion of social work and voluntaristic forms.
perpetuated and maintained itself for centuries as a voluntaristic,