voluntarism

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Related to voluntarists: volunteerism

vol·un·ta·rism

 (vŏl′ən-tə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. The use of or reliance on voluntary action to maintain an institution, carry out a policy, or achieve an end.
2. A theory or doctrine that regards the will as the fundamental principle of the individual or of the universe.

vol′un·ta·rist n.
vol′un·ta·ris′tic adj.

voluntarism

(ˈvɒləntəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that the will rather than the intellect is the ultimate principle of reality
2. a doctrine or system based on voluntary participation in a course of action
3. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the belief that the state, government, and the law should not interfere with the procedures of collective bargaining and of trade union organization
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another name for voluntaryism
ˈvoluntarist n, adj
ˌvoluntaˈristic adj

vol•un•ta•rism

(ˈvɒl ən təˌrɪz əm)

n.
1. any theory that regards will as the fundamental agency or principle, in metaphysics, epistemology, or psychology.
2. the principle or practice of supporting schools, hospitals, churches, etc., by voluntary contributions or aid instead of relying on government assistance.
3. any policy based on voluntary action.
[1830–40]
vol′un•ta•rist, n., adj.
vol`un•ta•ris′tic, adj.

voluntarism

any theory that regards the will rather than the intellect as the fundamental agency or principle in human activities and experience, as Nietzscheism. — voluntarist, n.voluntaristic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
Translations

voluntarism

[ˈvɒləntərɪzəm] Nvoluntariado m

voluntarism

n no plVoluntarismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
And, just as for standard voluntarists, there is no independent standard--metaphysical or otherwise--of morality apart from God's commands, there is no independent standard of goodness with respect to God's goodness as well.
Fanon should be read, in short, as one of the most insightful and uncompromising political voluntarists of the twentieth century.
Even moral voluntarists who believe that none of this can be seen in the natural world due to human sin, acknowledge that "the wages of sin is death" (Rom.
Conceptually, criminal law voluntarists tend to view strong emotions as diminishing an offender's culpability on the ground that they detract from "the accused's capacity for self-control" or constrain her opportunity to exercise it.
For both Cudworth and Price, in running the Cudworthy argument, take care to insist that voluntarists cannot really intend to mean that "ought to" just means "has been commanded by God to," and in favor of this point each offers an argument that anticipates Moore's Open Question Argument (19) (in fact, Price's argument is plausibly more careful than Moore's).
Even educational voluntarists opposed religious training in state-supported schools out of solicitude for the rights of secularists, not because they opposed using public funds to propagate what they considered religious error.
Most voluntarists, such as Nozick, would therefore argue against the view that the nation-state could be conceived as a voluntary association and hold that distributive communities would have to be much smaller.
The second is that the classification outlined here is unusual and does not cover other, more familiar cleavages, either resulting similarly from divergent conceptions of the nature of law, such as the cleavages that separate those who see in the customary process an act of law creation and those who do not see anything other than an act of declaration, or the cleavages resulting from divergent conceptions of international society, such as that which opposes voluntarists to nonvoluntarists.
Voluntarists, influenced by Kant, claim that criminal liability is founded upon the agent's choice as to whether or not to obey the law; on this view, a person who commits a criminal act is entitled to an excuse just in case she could not have chosen other than as she did.
This theological concept of the will as a spiritual power exercising control over our voluntary actions, further developed by Aquinas and the medieval voluntarists, is obviously the main influence on Petrarch, the key figure in Renaissance discussions.
The success and resistance of the Cuban Revolution, based on its revolutionary mobilization, organization, and military, enormously strengthened the arguments of the voluntarists among this first wave of Latin American revolutionaries.
As the state assumed responsibility for health care, voluntarists mourned the passing of an age and wondered about partnership with government in a post-philanthropic era.