vortex

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vor·tex

 (vôr′tĕks′)
n. pl. vor·tex·es or vor·ti·ces (-tĭ-sēz′)
1. A whirling mass of water or air that sucks everything near it toward its center.
2. A place or situation regarded as drawing into its center all that surrounds it, and hence being inescapable or destructive: a vortex of political infighting; a vortex of despair.

[Latin vortex, vortic-, variant of vertex, from vertere, to turn; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

vortex

(ˈvɔːtɛks)
n, pl -texes or -tices (-tɪˌsiːz)
1. (General Physics) a whirling mass or rotary motion in a liquid, gas, flame, etc, such as the spiralling movement of water around a whirlpool
2. any activity, situation, or way of life regarded as irresistibly engulfing
[C17: from Latin: a whirlpool; variant of vertex]
ˈvortical adj
ˈvortically adv

vor•tex

(ˈvɔr tɛks)

n., pl. -tex•es, -ti•ces (-təˌsiz)
1. a whirling mass of water, esp. one in which a force of suction operates, as a whirlpool.
2. a whirling mass of air, esp. one in the form of a visible column or spiral, as a tornado.
3. a whirling mass of fire, flame, etc.
4. something likened to a whirlpool, as in violent activity or the tendency to draw into its current everything that surrounds it.
[1645–55; < Latin, variant of vertex]

vor·tex

(vôr′tĕks′)
Plural vortexes or vortices (vôr′tĭ-sēz′)
A mass of whirling fluid, especially a whirling mass of water or air that sucks everything near it toward its center. Eddies and whirlpools are examples of vortexes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vortex - the shape of something rotating rapidlyvortex - the shape of something rotating rapidly
round shape - a shape that is curved and without sharp angles
2.vortex - a powerful circular current of water (usually the result of conflicting tides)vortex - a powerful circular current of water (usually the result of conflicting tides)
current, stream - a steady flow of a fluid (usually from natural causes); "the raft floated downstream on the current"; "he felt a stream of air"; "the hose ejected a stream of water"
Charybdis - (Greek mythology) a ship-devouring whirlpool lying on the other side of a narrow strait from Scylla

vortex

noun whirlpool, eddy, maelstrom, Charybdis (literary), gyre, countercurrent a vortex of encircling winds
Translations
vortico
kitanielupyörrepyörremyrsky

vortex

[ˈvɔːteks] N (vortexes or vortices (pl)) [ˈvɔːtɪsiːz]
1. (lit) → vórtice m, torbellino m
2. (fig) [of activity] → torbellino, remolino m

vortex

n pl <-es or vortices> (lit)Wirbel m, → Strudel m (also fig)

vortex

[ˈvɔːtɛks] n (vortices (pl)) [ˈvɔːtɪsiːz] (frm) (whirl) → vortice m (fig) → turbine m

vor·tex

n. vórtice, estructura de forma espiral.
References in classic literature ?
Under-powered craft, we are told, can ascend to the limit of their lift, mail-packets to look out for them accordingly; the lower lanes westward are pitting very badly, "with frequent blow-outs, vortices, laterals, etc.
We were dragged hither and yon by warm or, frozen suctions, belched up on the tops of wulii-was, spun down by vortices and clubbed aside by laterals under a dizzying rush of stars in the, company of a drunken moon.
This great philosopher freely acknowledged his own mistakes in natural philosophy, because he proceeded in many things upon conjecture, as all men must do; and he found that Gassendi, who had made the doctrine of Epicurus as palatable as he could, and the vortices of Descartes, were equally to be exploded.
Even with a microscope directed on a water-drop we find ourselves making interpretations which turn out to be rather coarse; for whereas under a weak lens you may seem to see a creature exhibiting an active voracity into which other smaller creatures actively play as if they were so many animated tax-pennies, a stronger lens reveals to you certain tiniest hairlets which make vortices for these victims while the swallower waits passively at his receipt of custom.
Furious vortices of sulphur and nitre, devouring shoals of fire which caught every object, the terrible thunder of the explosion, this is what the second which followed disclosed in that cavern of horrors.
Vortices are clearly identified by applying iso-surfaces of Q-criterion [20].
The term polar vortex has become part of the everyday vocabulary, but there is some confusion in the media, general public, and science community regarding what polar vortices are and how they are related to various weather events.
Vortices also have vertical flows, but these have much less energy.
The creation of these knotted vortices in the lab, reported March 3 in Nature Physics, could help scientists understand the flow of plasma on the sun and the flow of air, blood and other fluids here on Earth, Barenghi says.
It is simpler to consider fixed vortices rather than those that are free to move with the flow.
Ocean Vortices Could Lead to Long-term Renewable Energy