voter


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Related to voter: voter turnout

vot·er

 (vō′tər)
n.
1. One who votes.
2. One who has the right to vote: Only half of the voters participated in the election.

voter

(ˈvəʊtə)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who can or does vote

vot•er

(ˈvoʊ tər)

n.
1. a person who votes.
2. a person who has a right to vote; elector.
[1570–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.voter - a citizen who has a legal right to votevoter - a citizen who has a legal right to vote
electorate - the body of enfranchised citizens; those qualified to vote
constituent - a member of a constituency; a citizen who is represented in a government by officials for whom he or she votes; "needs continued support by constituents to be re-elected"
citizen - a native or naturalized member of a state or other political community
crossover voter, crossover - a voter who is registered as a member of one political party but who votes in the primary of another party
floater - a voter who votes illegally at different polling places in the same election
floating voter, swing voter - a voter who has no allegiance to any political party and whose unpredictable decisions can swing the outcome of an election one way or the other

voter

noun
One who votes:
Translations
ناخِب، مُصَوِّت
volič-ka
vælger
äänestäjä
szavazó
kjósandi
volivec
väljare

voter

[ˈvəʊtəʳ] N (gen) → votante mf; (in election) → elector(a) m/f

voter

[ˈvəʊtər] nélecteur/trice m/fvote-winner [ˈvəʊtwɪnər] natout m électoral

voter

nWähler(in) m(f)

voter

[ˈvəʊtəʳ] nelettore/trice

vote

(vəut) noun
(the right to show) one's wish or opinion, eg in a ballot or by raising a hand etc, especially at an election or in a debate. In Britain, the vote was given to women over twenty-one in 1928; Nowadays everyone over eighteen has a vote; A vote was taken to decide the matter.
verb
1. to cast or record one's vote. She voted for the Conservative candidate; I always vote Labour; I shall vote against the restoration of capital punishment.
2. to allow, by a vote, the provision of (something) eg to someone, for a purpose etc. They were voted $5,000 to help them in their research.
ˈvoter noun
a person who votes or has the right to vote.
vote of confidence
a vote taken to establish whether the government or other authority still has the majority's support for its policies.
vote of thanks
an invitation, usually in the form of a short speech, to an audience etc to show gratitude to a speaker etc by applauding etc. Mrs Smith proposed a vote of thanks to the organizers of the concert.
References in classic literature ?
The chairman was still more worried when the monster torchlight procession came off, with the members of the Doyle Republican Association all in red capes and hats, and free beer for every voter in the ward--the best beer ever given away in a political campaign, as the whole electorate testified.
The colored man, by the law of Ohio, cannot be a voter, and, till within a few years, was even denied the right of testimony in legal suits with the white.
His life, before he came to Raveloe, had been filled with the movement, the mental activity, and the close fellowship, which, in that day as in this, marked the life of an artisan early incorporated in a narrow religious sect, where the poorest layman has the chance of distinguishing himself by gifts of speech, and has, at the very least, the weight of a silent voter in the government of his community.
Now you can go on from here," said Cheyne, slowly, "costing me between six or eight thousand a year till you're a voter.
I am glad to add, however, that at the present time the disposition to vote against the white man merely because he is white is largely disappearing, and the race is learning to vote from principle, for what the voter considers to be for the best interests of both races.
It was so cleverly stupid and unoriginal, and also so convincing, that the leaders cannot help but regard him as safe and sure, while his platitudes are so much like the platitudes of the average voter that - oh, well, you know you flatter any man by dressing up his own thoughts for him and presenting them to him.
A GREAT Philanthropist who had thought of himself in connection with the Presidency and had introduced a bill into Congress requiring the Government to loan every voter all the money that he needed, on his personal security, was explaining to a Sunday-school at a railway station how much he had done for the country, when an angel looked down from Heaven and wept.
I should not like to have it pasted over with their great bills, and as to making Jack and Captain race about to the public-houses to bring up half-drunken voters, why, I think 'twould be an insult to the horses.
That and outside work among the voters will, to a certainty.
He then desired to know, "What arts were practised in electing those whom I called commoners: whether a stranger, with a strong purse, might not influence the vulgar voters to choose him before their own landlord, or the most considerable gentleman in the neighbourhood?
It has become so truly an organ of the social body that by telephone we now enter into contracts, give evidence, try lawsuits, make speeches, propose marriage, confer degrees, appeal to voters, and do almost everything else that is a matter of speech.
In the last State the members of Assembly for the cities and counties of New York and Albany are elected by very nearly as many voters as will be entitled to a representative in the Congress, calculating on the number of sixty-five representatives only.