voting


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vote

 (vōt)
n.
1.
a. A formal expression of preference for a candidate for office or for a proposed resolution of an issue: Let's decide the matter by vote.
b. The act of voting: It took several votes to decide the matter.
c. A means by which such a preference is made known, such as a raised hand or a marked ballot: looked around the room and counted the votes in favor.
2. The number of votes cast in an election or to resolve an issue: a heavy vote in favor of the bill.
3. A group of voters alike in some way: the African-American vote; the rural vote.
4. The result of an election or referendum: The measure was defeated in a resounding negative vote.
5. The right to participate as a voter; suffrage: when the nation gave the vote to women.
v. vot·ed, vot·ing, votes
v.intr.
1. To express one's preference for a candidate or for a proposed resolution of an issue; cast a vote: voting against the measure.
2. To express a choice or an opinion: The children voted unanimously by jumping up and down.
v.tr.
1. To express one's preference for by vote: voted the straight Republican ticket.
2. To decide the disposition of by vote, as by electing or defeating: vote in a new mayor; voted out their representative; vote down the amendment.
3. To bring into existence or make available by vote: vote new funds for a program.
4. To be guided by in voting: vote one's conscience.
5. To declare or pronounce by general consent: voted the play a success.
6. Informal To state as a preference or opinion: I vote we eat out tonight.
Idiom:
vote with (one's) feet Informal
To indicate a preference or an opinion by leaving or entering a particular locale: "If older cities are allowed to decay and contract, can citizens who vote with their feet ... hope to find better conditions anywhere else?" (Melinda Beck).

[Middle English, vow, from Latin vōtum, from neuter past participle of vovēre, to vow.]

vot′a·ble, vote′a·ble adj.

voting

(ˈvəʊtɪŋ)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the action or process of indicating choice, opinion, or will on a question, such as the choosing of a candidate, by or as if by some recognized means, such as a ballot
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.voting - a choice that is made by counting the number of people in favor of each alternativevoting - a choice that is made by counting the number of people in favor of each alternative; "there were only 17 votes in favor of the motion"; "they allowed just one vote per person"
selection, choice, option, pick - the act of choosing or selecting; "your choice of colors was unfortunate"; "you can take your pick"
block vote - a vote proportional in magnitude to the number of people that a delegate represents
secret ballot - a vote in which each person's choice is secret but the totaled votes are public
split ticket - a ballot cast by a voter who votes for candidates from more than one party
straight ticket - a ballot cast by a voter who votes for all the candidates of one party
multiple voting - the act of voting in more than one place by the same person at the same election (illegal in U.S.)
casting vote - the deciding vote cast by the presiding officer to resolve a tie
veto - a vote that blocks a decision
write-in - a vote cast by writing in the name of a candidate who is not listed on the ballot
Translations
hlasování

voting

[ˈvəʊtɪŋ]
A. Nvotación f
B. CPD voting booth Ncabina f electoral
voting machine N (US) → máquina f de votar
voting paper Npapeleta f de votación
voting pattern Ntendencia f de la votación
voting power Npotencia f electoral
voting right Nderecho m a voto
voting share Nacción f con derecho a voto
voting slip N = voting paper

voting

[ˈvəʊtɪŋ] nscrutin mvoting paper n (British)bulletin m de votevoting precinct n (US)circonscription f électoralevoting rights npldroit m de votevoting share naction f avec droit de vote

voting

nWahl f; which way is the voting going?welchen Verlauf nimmt die Wahl?; a system of votingein Wahlsystem nt; to analyze the votingdas Wahlergebnis analysieren; voting was heavydie Wahlbeteiligung war hoch; light votinggeringe Wahlbeteiligung

voting

:
voting age
nWahlalter nt
voting booth
nWahlkabine f
voting machine
n (US) → Wahlmaschine f
voting paper
nStimmzettel m
voting power
n (= right to vote)Stimmberechtigung f, → Stimmrecht nt; (power of a certain group) → Wahlstärke f
voting precinct
n (US Pol) → Wahlbezirk m
voting right
nStimmrecht nt

voting

[ˈvəʊtɪŋ] nvotazione f, voto
References in classic literature ?
And now, when the question of voting had come, this repulsive fact told more strongly against Mr.
He did not like frustrating his own best purposes by getting on bad terms with Bulstrode; he did not like voting against Farebrother, and helping to deprive him of function and salary; and the question occurred whether the additional forty pounds might not leave the Vicar free from that ignoble care about winning at cards.
But I shall not desist from voting with him on that account.
But in all such Cases the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by Yeas and Nays, and the Names of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the Journal of each House respectively.
All voting is a sort of gaming, like checkers or backgammon, with a slight moral tinge to it, a playing with right and wrong, with moral questions; and betting naturally accompanies it.
Marcos, who has been leading in the unofficial count until Tuesday dawn, asked the Commission on Elections and the Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting to stop the unofficial tallying of votes supposedly to avoid confusion with the official tally.
The preliminary results of voting in the parliamentary elections.
This season, the audience will start voting for its favorite crooners on February 21.
I enjoy making an appearance, it makes me feel proactive and involved in the voting process,'' Roberts said.
At hundreds of precincts in Montgomery County, for instance, new touch-screen voting machines sat useless for lack of plastic authorization cards needed to operate them.
Maryland Governor Robert Ehrlich has recently urged scrapping that state's recently-purchased electronic voting machines and replacing them with paper ballots for this upcoming election because of technical and human "problems" with the machines in the primaries.
In the wake of corporate scandals at Enron and elsewhere, stock market investors are becoming increasingly aware of the power of voting their "proxies" (something like absentee ballots) to help steer corporate decision-making.