vulgar


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Related to vulgar: Vulgar Latin

vul·gar

 (vŭl′gər)
adj.
1.
a. Crudely indecent: a vulgar joke.
b. Deficient in taste, consideration, or refinement: "that vulgar jockeying for position around the bedside of the gravely ill" (Susan Sontag).
c. Given to crudity or tastelessness, as in one's behavior: "He relentlessly vilified the studio executives as vulgar, ignorant hoodlums" (Marion Meade).
d. Offensively excessive in self-display or expenditure; ostentatious: the huge vulgar houses and cars of the newly rich.
2. Spoken by or expressed in language spoken by the common people; vernacular: the technical and vulgar names for an animal species.
3. Of or associated with the great masses of people; common.

[Middle English, of or relating to the common people, from Latin vulgāris, from vulgus, the common people.]

vul′gar·ly adv.
vul′gar·ness n.

vulgar

(ˈvʌlɡə)
adj
1. marked by lack of taste, culture, delicacy, manners, etc: vulgar behaviour; vulgar language.
2. (Linguistics) (often capital; usually prenominal) denoting a form of a language, esp of Latin, current among common people, esp at a period when the formal language is archaic and not in general spoken use
3. archaic
a. of, relating to, or current among the great mass of common people, in contrast to the educated, cultured, or privileged; ordinary
b. (as collective noun; preceded by the): the vulgar.
[C14: from Latin vulgāris belonging to the multitude, from vulgus the common people]
ˈvulgarly adv

vul•gar

(ˈvʌl gər)

adj.
1. characterized by ignorance of or lack of good breeding or taste: vulgar ostentation.
2. indecent; obscene; lewd: a vulgar gesture.
3. lacking in refinement; crude; coarse; boorish.
4. of, pertaining to, or constituting the ordinary people in a society.
5. spoken by, or being in the language spoken by, the people generally; vernacular.
6. current; popular; common: vulgar beliefs.
7. lacking in distinction or aesthetic value; banal; ordinary.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin vulgāris=vulg(us) the general public + -āris -ar1]
vul′gar•ly, adv.
vul′gar•ness, n.
syn: See common.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.vulgar - lacking refinement or cultivation or tastevulgar - lacking refinement or cultivation or taste; "he had coarse manners but a first-rate mind"; "behavior that branded him as common"; "an untutored and uncouth human being"; "an uncouth soldier--a real tough guy"; "appealing to the vulgar taste for violence"; "the vulgar display of the newly rich"
unrefined - (used of persons and their behavior) not refined; uncouth; "how can a refined girl be drawn to such an unrefined man?"
2.vulgar - of or associated with the great masses of peoplevulgar - of or associated with the great masses of people; "the common people in those days suffered greatly"; "behavior that branded him as common"; "his square plebeian nose"; "a vulgar and objectionable person"; "the unwashed masses"
lowborn - of humble birth or origins; "a topsy-turvy society of lowborn rich and blue-blooded poor"
3.vulgar - being or characteristic of or appropriate to everyday language; "common parlance"; "a vernacular term"; "vernacular speakers"; "the vulgar tongue of the masses"; "the technical and vulgar names for an animal species"
informal - used of spoken and written language
4.vulgar - conspicuously and tastelessly indecent; "coarse language"; "a crude joke"; "crude behavior"; "an earthy sense of humor"; "a revoltingly gross expletive"; "a vulgar gesture"; "full of language so vulgar it should have been edited"
indecent - offensive to good taste especially in sexual matters; "an earthy but not indecent story"; "an indecent gesture"

vulgar

adjective
1. tasteless, common, flashy, low, gross, nasty, gaudy, tawdry, cheap and nasty, common as muck The decor is ugly, tasteless and vulgar.
tasteless elegant, tasteful, high-brow, classical
2. crude, dirty, rude, low, blue, nasty, naughty, coarse, indecent, improper, suggestive, tasteless, risqué, off colour, ribald, indelicate, indecorous an oaf with a taste for racist and vulgar jokes
3. uncouth, boorish, unrefined, impolite, ill-bred, unmannerly He was a vulgar old man, but he never swore in front of women.
uncouth sophisticated, refined, polite, upper-class, aristocratic, genteel, urbane, decorous, well-mannered
4. vernacular, native, common, general, ordinary translated from Latin into the vulgar tongue
Quotations
"It's worse than wicked, my dear, it's vulgar" Punch

vulgar

adjective
Translations
سُوْقِيّشَعْبي، الناس العاديينفَظ، خَشِن
lidovýnevkusnývulgární
vulgærplatsimpel
rahvaanomainenrivokansanomainen
vulgaran
vulgáris
低俗な
저속한
liaudiškasvulgariaivulgarumas
piedauzīgspraststautas-vulgārs
prostaški
vulgär
หยาบคาย ขาดความประณีต
hoşa gitmezkabaterbiyesiz
tục tĩu

vulgar

[ˈvʌlgəʳ] ADJ
1. (= unrefined, coarse) [person, taste] → ordinario, vulgar
it is vulgar to talk about moneyhablar de dinero es una ordinariez or vulgaridad, hablar de dinero es de mala educación
2. (= tasteless) → de mal gusto, vulgar
3. (= indecent) [joke] → verde, colorado (LAm); [song] → grosero; [person, comedian] → grosero, ordinario
4. (of the people) → vulgar
Vulgar Latinlatín m vulgar
in the vulgar tongueen la lengua vulgar or vernácula
5. (Math) vulgar fractionfracción f común

vulgar

[ˈvʌlgər] adj
(= tasteless) [furniture, decorations, appearance, film] → vulgaire
(= crude) [joke, language, gesture] → vulgaire; [person, behaviour] → vulgaire

vulgar

adj
(pej) (= unrefined)ordinär, vulgär; clothes, jokeordinär; (= tasteless)geschmacklos; it is vulgar to talk about moneyes ist unfein, über Geld zu reden
(old, = of the common people) → gemein (old); vulgar beliefsvolkstümliche Auffassungen pl; in the vulgar tonguein der Sprache des Volkes

vulgar

[ˈvʌlgəʳ] adj (gen) (pej) → volgare

vulgar

(ˈvalgə) adjective
1. not generally socially acceptable, decent or polite; ill-mannered. Such behaviour is regarded as vulgar.
2. of the common or ordinary people. the vulgar tongue/language.
ˈvulgarly adverb
vulˈgarity (-ˈgӕ-) plural vulˈgarities noun
(an example of) bad manners, bad taste etc, in eg speech, behaviour etc. the vulgarity of his language.

vulgar

سُوْقِيّ nevkusný vulgær vulgär χυδαίος vulgar rahvaanomainen vulgaire vulgaran volgare 低俗な 저속한 vulgair vulgær wulgarny ordinário, vulgar вульгарный vulgär หยาบคาย ขาดความประณีต kaba tục tĩu 粗俗的
References in classic literature ?
I was very unwise to let you go among people of whom I know so little, kind, I dare say, but worldly, ill-bred, and full of these vulgar ideas about young people.
At a respectful distance from this unusual show, were gathered divers groups of curious idlers; some admiring the blood and bone of the high-mettled military charger, and others gazing at the preparations, with the dull wonder of vulgar curiosity.
He, however, wiped his lips with a slight wave of his handkerchief, to support a certain easy elegance which he firmly believed relieved the act of any vulgar quality.
How could the born, lady the recluse of half a lifetime, utterly unpractised in the world, at sixty years of age,--how could she ever dream of succeeding, when the hard, vulgar, keen, busy, hackneyed New England woman had lost five dollars on her little outlay
The vulgar, who, in those dreary old times, were always contributing a grotesque horror to what interested their imaginations, had a story about the scarlet letter which we might readily work up into a terrific legend.
The story WON'T tell," said Douglas; "not in any literal, vulgar way.
Nevertheless, as this young man was in the eye of the law not a man, but a thing, all these superior qualifications were subject to the control of a vulgar, narrow-minded, tyrannical master.
His gait, his attitudes, his gestures, his bearing, his laugh-- all were vulgar and uncouth; his manners were the manners of a slave.
At last the enemy's mother appeared, and called Tom a bad, vicious, vulgar child, and ordered him away.
Rebecca was in the normally unconscious state that belonged to her years; boys were good comrades, but no more; she liked reciting in the same class with them, everything seemed to move better; but from vulgar and precocious flirtations she was protected by her ideals.
But if he marries a very ignorant, vulgar woman, certainly I had better not visit her, if I can help it.
Jennings, Lady Middleton's mother, was a good-humoured, merry, fat, elderly woman, who talked a great deal, seemed very happy, and rather vulgar.