wacky

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wack·y

(wăk′ē) also whack·y (wăk′ē, hwăk′ē)
adj. wack·i·er, wack·i·est also whack·i·er or whack·i·est Slang
1. Eccentric or irrational: a wacky person.
2. Crazy; silly: a wacky outfit.

[Variant of whacky, probably from the phrase out of whack; see whack.]

wack′i·ly adv.
wack′i·ness n.

wacky

(ˈwækɪ)
adj, wackier or wackiest
slang eccentric, erratic, or unpredictable
[C19 (in dialect sense: a fool, an eccentric): from whack (hence, a whacky, a person who behaves as if he had been whacked on the head)]
ˈwackily adv
ˈwackiness n

wack•y

(ˈwæk i)

also whacky



adj. wack•i•er, wack•i•est. Slang.
odd or irrational; crazy.
[1935–40; appar. whack (n., as in out of whack) + -y1]
wack′i•ly, adv.
wack′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.wacky - ludicrous, foolish; "gave me a cockamamie reason for not going"; "wore a goofy hat"; "a silly idea"; "some wacky plan for selling more books"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
foolish - devoid of good sense or judgment; "foolish remarks"; "a foolish decision"
2.wacky - informal or slang terms for mentally irregularwacky - informal or slang terms for mentally irregular; "it used to drive my husband balmy"
insane - afflicted with or characteristic of mental derangement; "was declared insane"; "insane laughter"

wacky

adjective unusual, odd, wild, strange, out there (slang), crazy, silly, weird, way-out (informal), eccentric, unpredictable, daft (informal), irrational, erratic, Bohemian, unconventional, far-out (slang), loony (slang), kinky (informal), off-the-wall (slang), unorthodox, nutty (slang), oddball, zany, goofy (informal), offbeat (informal), freaky (slang), outré, gonzo (slang), screwy (informal), wacko or whacko (informal) a wacky new comedy series

wacky

also whacky
adjective
2. Slang. Afflicted with or exhibiting irrationality and mental unsoundness:
Informal: bonkers, cracked, daffy, gaga, loony.
Chiefly British: crackers.
Idioms: around the bend, crazy as a loon, mad as a hatter, not all there, nutty as a fruitcake, off one's head, off one's rocker, of unsound mind, out of one's mind, sick in the head, stark raving mad.
Translations

wacky

[ˈwækɪ] ADJ (wackier (compar) (wackiest (superl))) [person] → chiflado; [idea] → disparatado
wacky baccy (Brit) (hum) → chocolate m, costo m

wacky

[ˈwæki] whacky hwæki] adj [person, comedian, idea] → farfelu(e); [film, TV show, humour] → délirant(e)

wacky

adj (+er) (inf)verrückt (inf)

wacky

whacky [ˈwækɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (fam) → pazzoide
References in periodicals archive ?
The cast were resplendent in bright colours and all-out wackiness and, for the first time, I found myself taking in the detail as something to be enjoyed in its own right.
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Wooster desperately needs Jeeves' help in evading the endless threat of matrimony, the disapproval of overbearing aunts, and more in this nonstop treasury of wit and wackiness.
But for real take-it-to-thelimit wackiness there's only one place to go.
This early, Embiid may be ahead of curve with his wackiness and ability to laugh at himself.
Through it all runs an undercurrent of social commentary and satire delivered with wry humor and "cheerfully skewed wackiness.
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No, we don't want our night-time schedules packed with Timmy Mallett-style enforced fun and wackiness - but how much grinding, hardcore violence and general desolation can people take after a long day at work (or long day looking for work)?