wages


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Related to wages: salary, Minimum wages

wage

 (wāj)
n.
1. A regular payment, usually on an hourly, daily, or weekly basis, made by an employer to an employee, especially for manual or unskilled work.
2. wages The price of labor in an economy.
3. often wages(used with a sing. or pl. verb) A fitting return; a recompense: the wages of sin.
tr.v. waged, wag·ing, wag·es
To engage in (a war or campaign, for example).

[Middle English, from Old North French, of Germanic origin.]

salary

wages

Salary and wages are both used to refer to the money paid to someone regularly for the work they do.

1. 'salary'

Professional people such as teachers are usually paid a salary. Their salary is the total amount of money that they are paid each year, although this is paid in twelve parts, one each month.

She earns a high salary as an accountant.
My salary is paid into my bank account at the end of the month.
2. 'wages'

If someone gets money each week for the work they do, you refer to this money as their wages.

On Friday afternoon the men are paid their wages.
He was working shifts at the factory and earning good wages.
3. 'wage'

You can refer in a general way to the amount that someone earns as a wage.

It is hard to bring up children on a low wage.
The government introduced a legal minimum wage.

You can also talk about someone's hourly, weekly, or monthly wage to mean the money that they earn each hour, week, or month.

Her hourly wage had gone up from £5.10 to £5.70.
The suit cost £40, more than twice the average weekly wage at that time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wages - a recompense for worthy acts or retribution for wrongdoingwages - a recompense for worthy acts or retribution for wrongdoing; "the wages of sin is death"; "virtue is its own reward"
aftermath, consequence - the outcome of an event especially as relative to an individual
Translations

wages

plLohn m; the wages of sindie gerechte Strafe, der Sünde Lohn (old)
References in classic literature ?
Dashwood graciously permitted her to fill his columns at the lowest prices, not thinking it necessary to tell her that the real cause of his hospitality was the fact that one of his hacks, on being offered higher wages, had basely left him in the lurch.
The husband, in Chicago, was working in a furniture factory for modest wages, and when he met his family at the station he was rather crushed by the size of it.
Uncle Sam's gold -- meaning no disrespect to the worthy old gentleman -- has, in this respect, a quality of enchantment like that of the devil's wages.
Arrived at last in old Sag Harbor; and seeing what the sailors did there; and then going on to Nantucket, and seeing how they spent their wages in that place also, poor Queequeg gave it up for lost.
When the old man died some years after I stepped into his place, and now of course I have top wages, and can lay by for a rainy day or a sunny day, as it may happen, and Nelly is as happy as a bird.
Jadvyga likewise paints cans, but then she has an invalid mother and three little sisters to support by it, and so she does not spend her wages for shirtwaists.
Accordingly, the manufacturer and all hands concerned were astounded when he suddenly demanded George's wages, and announced his intention of taking him home.
I belong to the Seventh Cavalry and Ninth Dragoons, I am an officer, too, and do not have to work on account of not getting any wages.
I do not know whether hotel servants in New York get any wages or not, but I do know that in some of the hotels there the feeing system in vogue is a heavy burden.
Well, then, says I, what's the use you learning to do right when it's troublesome to do right and ain't no trouble to do wrong, and the wages is just the same?
We traveled all about Germany, receiving no wages, and not even our keep.
There are wealthy gentlemen in England who drive four-horse passenger- coaches twenty or thirty miles on a daily line, in the summer, because the privilege costs them considerable money; but if they were offered wages for the service, that would turn it into work and then they would resign.