wagonette


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wagonette

(ˌwæɡəˈnɛt) or

waggonette

n
(Automotive Engineering) a light four-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle with two lengthwise seats facing each other behind a crosswise driver's seat
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Outside, beyond the low, white fence, a wagonette with a pair of cobs was waiting.
The wagonette swung round into a side road, and we curved upward through deep lanes worn by centuries of wheels, high banks on either side, heavy with dripping moss and fleshy hart's-tongue ferns.
Our wagonette had topped a rise and in front of us rose the huge expanse of the moor, mottled with gnarled and craggy cairns and tors.
A tall man had stepped from the shadow of the porch to open the door of the wagonette.
The new frocks were taken off, and orders were given for the little girls to have their blouses put on, and the boys their old jackets, and the wagonette to be harnessed; with Brownie, to the bailiff's annoyance, again in the shafts, to drive out for mushroom picking and bathing.
Perhaps they would like us to lend them the wagonette to drive in?
The coach was a kind of commodious wagonette, invented by the modernist talent of the courier, who dominated the expedition with his scientific activity and breezy wit.
On glowing summer afternoons wagonettes came full of Americans and cultured suburbans to see the sepulchre; but even then they felt the vast forest land with its one dumpy dome of churchyard and church as a place oddly dumb and neglected.
On the walls were coloured photographs of the same scene, and of the system of wagonettes that took tourists to see it.
And people would pass the house, going off in wagonettes and coaches as jolly and merry as could be, the sun shining out, and not a cloud to be seen.
There were, Colonel Clibborn later wrote, "officers and soldiers of the corps there in a long wagonette .
3 People carrier: See one of the earliest British cars, the Coventry-built Daimler Wagonette (pictured above) from 1897.