waif

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waif 1

 (wāf)
n.
1.
a. A homeless person, especially a forsaken or orphaned child.
b. An abandoned young animal.
2. A person, especially a young woman, who is thin or gaunt.
3. Something found and unclaimed, as an object cast up by the sea.

[Middle English, ownerless property, stray animal, from Anglo-Norman, probably of Scandinavian origin; see weip- in Indo-European roots.]

waif 2

 (wāf)
n. Nautical
See waft.

[Probably of Scandinavian origin; see weip- in Indo-European roots.]

waif

(weɪf)
n
1. (Sociology) a person, esp a child, who is homeless, friendless, or neglected
2. anything found and not claimed, the owner being unknown
3. (Nautical Terms) nautical another name for waft5
4. (Law) law obsolete a stolen article thrown away by a thief in his flight and forfeited to the Crown or to the lord of the manor
[C14: from Anglo-Norman, variant of Old Northern French gaif, of Scandinavian origin; related to Old Norse veif a flapping thing]
ˈwaifˌlike, ˈwaifish adj

waif


(wāf),
n.
1. a person, esp. a child, who has no home.
2. a stray animal, whose owner is not known.
3. a stray item or article.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French, orig. lost, stray, unclaimed (compare Old French guaif stray beast) < Scandinavian; compare Old Norse veif movement to and fro; see waive]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.waif - a homeless child especially one forsaken or orphanedwaif - a homeless child especially one forsaken or orphaned; "street children beg or steal in order to survive"
child, kid, minor, nipper, tiddler, youngster, tike, shaver, small fry, nestling, fry, tyke - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"

waif

noun stray, orphan, outcast, urchin, foundling an emaciated waif living rough on the streets
Translations
شارِد، شَخْص أو حَيَوان ضال
hjemløst barn
lelenc
umkomuleysingi; munaîarleysingi
benamis vaikas
bezpajumtnieks
kimsesiz çocuk

waif

[weɪf] N (= child) → niño/a m/f abandonado/a, niño/a m/f desamparado/a; (= animal) → animal m abandonado
waifs and strays (= children) → niños mpl abandonados or desamparados; (= animals) → animales mpl abandonados

waif

[ˈweɪf] ngamin(e) m/f des rues
waif-like → au physique de gamin(e) des rues

waif

nobdachloses or heimatloses Kind; (= animal)herrenloses Tier; the poor little waifdas arme kleine Ding, hat kein Zuhause, …; waifs and strays (= children)obdachlose or heimatlose Kinder pl; (= animals)herrenlose Tiere pl

waif

[weɪf] nbambino/a abbandonato/a; (slight person) → creatura gracile
waifs and strays → trovatelli mpl

waif

(weif) noun
a stray, uncared-for child. a poor little waif.
References in periodicals archive ?
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Mario Testino photographed the waifish model in the various looks for the issue.
Apker, a waifish young woman described by a teacher as a bit of a "Bohemian," was picked earlier this year as one of 30 finalists - out of 9,600 applicants nationwide - in the sixth annual Lucerne "The Art of Dairy" Art Contest.