waistband


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waist·band

 (wāst′bănd′)
n.
A band of material encircling and fitting the waist of a garment, such as pants or a skirt.

waistband

(ˈweɪstˌbænd)
n
(Knitting & Sewing) an encircling band of material to finish and strengthen a skirt or trousers at the waist

waist•band

(ˈweɪstˌbænd, -bənd)

n.
a band encircling the waist, esp. as a part of a skirt or pair of trousers.
[1575–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.waistband - a band of material around the waist that strengthens a skirt or trouserswaistband - a band of material around the waist that strengthens a skirt or trousers
band - a thin flat strip of flexible material that is worn around the body or one of the limbs (especially to decorate the body)
cummerbund - a broad pleated sash worn as formal dress with a tuxedo
Translations
الحافَّة العُليا للتنّورَه
linning
mittisband; strengur
bel yeri

waistband

[ˈweɪstbænd] Npretina f, cinturilla f

waistband

[ˈweɪstbænd] ntaille f
with an elasticated waistband → à taille élastique

waistband

[ˈweɪstˌbænd] ncintura

waist

(weist) noun
1. (the measurement round) the narrow part of the human body between the ribs and hips. She has a very small waist.
2. the narrow middle part of something similar, eg a violin, guitar etc.
3. the part of an article of clothing which goes round one's waist. Can you take in the waist of these trousers?
ˈwaisted adjective
shaped to fit round the waist. a waisted jacket.
waistband (ˈweisbӕnd) noun
the part of a pair of trousers, skirt etc which goes round the waist. The waistband of this skirt is too tight.
waistcoat (ˈweiskəut) noun
(American vest) a short, usually sleeveless jacket worn immediately under the outer jacket. a three-piece suit consists of trousers, jacket and waistcoat.

waistband

n. cinto, cinturón.
References in classic literature ?
She stretched out her strong young arms to the crowing baby, sat down in a chair with the child, turned her upside down unceremoniously, took from her waistband and scornfully flung away a crooked pin, walked with her (still in a highly reversed position) to the bureau, selected a large safety pin, and proceeded to attach her brief red flannel petticoat to a sort of shirt that she wore.
Both resorted to the drinking-table without stint, but each in a different way; the lion for the most part reclining with his hands in his waistband, looking at the fire, or occasionally flirting with some lighter document; the jackal, with knitted brows and intent face, so deep in his task, that his eyes did not even follow the hand he stretched out for his glass--which often groped about, for a minute or more, before it found the glass for his lips.
Now, when I saw that mysterious petticoat, and realised that its wearer would probably be pretty and young and generally charming, and that probably her name was somewhere on the waistband, the spirit of whim rejoiced within me.
I can no more tell you the whys and wherefores of myself than I can lift myself up by the waistband and carry myself into the next county, as some one challenged a speculator in perpetual motion to do.
In this exercise I once met an accident, which had like to have cost me my life; for, one of the pages having put my boat into the trough, the governess who attended Glumdalclitch very officiously lifted me up, to place me in the boat: but I happened to slip through her fingers, and should infallibly have fallen down forty feet upon the floor, if, by the luckiest chance in the world, I had not been stopped by a corking-pin that stuck in the good gentlewoman's stomacher; the head of the pin passing between my shirt and the waistband of my breeches, and thus I was held by the middle in the air, till Glumdalclitch ran to my relief.
Amongst them, I remarked some women, dressed from the hips to knees in quite a crinoline of herbs, that sustained a vegetable waistband.
First he put a waistband round him and then he gave him some well-cut thongs of ox-hide; the two men being now girt went into the middle of the ring, and immediately fell to; heavily indeed did they punish one another and lay about them with their brawny fists.
Her foulard gown was as simple as genius could make it, and she wore no ornaments, save a fine clasp to her waistband of dull gold, quaintly fashioned, and the fine gold chain around her neck, from which hung her racing-glasses.
The perfume of the violets at her waistband seemed to remind him of his return to civilization.
His muscles were getting flabby, and his tailor called attention to his increasing waistband.
His valet made a fortune out of his wardrobe: his toilet-table was covered with as many pomatums and essences as ever were employed by an old beauty: he had tried, in order to give himself a waist, every girth, stay, and waistband then invented.
Fumbling at his waistband, Saxon's hand had come in contact with a brightly inflamed surface larger than a soup plate